Thomas Skelly

Last updated
Thomas Skelly
Biographical details
BornMay 1879
Norwich, Connecticut
Playing career
Football
1903 Holy Cross
Baseball
1900–1903 Holy Cross
Position(s) Right fielder
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1904 Marquette
Head coaching record
Overall5–2

Thomas J. Skelly was an American football coach. Skelly was the fourth head football coach at Marquette University located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and he held that position for the 1904 season. His coaching record at Marquette was 5–2. [1]

Skelly, a native of Norwich, Connecticut, was a graduate of The College of the Holy Cross. There he played football, basketball and baseball, the latter with the position of right fielder, for three years. In the 1903 football season, he had also served as the team's captain. [2] [3]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Marquette Blue and Gold (Independent)(1904)
1904 Marquette5–2
Marquette:5–2
Total:5–2

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References

  1. Marquette Golden Eagles coaching records
  2. "Thos. J. Skelly", Lowell Sun, June 17, 1902, Lowell, Massachusetts
  3. "Norwich Boy Will Direct Athletics; Skelly Instructor at Marquette—Dyer Graduated". The Day . New London, Connecticut. June 24, 1904. p. 2. Retrieved December 21, 2016 via Google News.