Thomas Smales

Last updated
Tommy Smales
Personal information
Full nameThomas Smales
Born19 December 1934 [1]
Glasshoughton, West Yorkshire, England
Died26 October 2017(2017-10-26) (aged 82)
Leeds, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 6 in (168 cm)
Weight11 st 7 lb (73 kg)
Position Scrum-half
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1952–55 Featherstone Rovers
1955–64 Huddersfield 2951111335
1964–67 Bradford Northern 6113039
1967 North Sydney 9000
1967–68 Wakefield Trinity 5000
Total37012410374
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1962 England 10000
1962–65 Great Britain 82006
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
196970 Castleford 674621969
1976 Featherstone Rovers 16111469
197879 Featherstone Rovers 22611527
Total1056343860
Source: [2] [3] [4]

Thomas "Tommy" Smales (19 December 1934 – 26 October 2017) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Castleford, Huddersfield (captain), Bradford Northern, North Sydney Bears and Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 736) as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached at club level for Castleford and Featherstone Rovers (two spells). [5] [6]

Rugby league Full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field

Rugby league football is a full-contact sport played by two teams of thirteen players on a rectangular field. One of the two codes of rugby, it originated in Northern England in 1895 as a split from the Rugby Football Union over the issue of payments to players. Its rules progressively changed with the aim of producing a faster, more entertaining game for spectators.

Coach (sport) person involved in directing, instructing and training sportspeople

In sports, a coach is a person involved in the direction, instruction and training of the operations of a sports team or of individual sportspeople. A coach may also be a teacher.

Great Britain national rugby league team National team that represents Great Britain and Ireland

The Great Britain and Ireland national rugby league team represents Great Britain and Ireland in rugby league. Administered by the Rugby Football League (RFL), the team is nicknamed The Lions.

Contents

Background

Tommy Smales's birth was registered in Pontefract, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, he was the landlord of the Traveller's Rest public house, Pontefract Road, Featherstone for 35-years, from 1969 until 2004, [7] and he died aged 82 in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. [8]

Pontefract market town in West Yorkshire, England

Pontefract is a historic market town in West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 and the M62 motorway. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is one of the five towns in the metropolitan borough of the City of Wakefield and has a population of 28,250, increasing to 30,881 at the 2011 Census. Pontefract's motto is Post mortem patris pro filio, Latin for "After the death of the father, support the son", a reference to the English Civil War Royalist sympathies.

West Riding of Yorkshire one of the historic subdivisions of Yorkshire, England

The West Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three historic subdivisions of Yorkshire, England. From 1889 to 1974 the administrative county, County of York, West Riding, was based closely on the historic boundaries. The lieutenancy at that time included the City of York and as such was named West Riding of the County of York and the County of the City of York.

Pub drinking establishment

A pub, or public house, is an establishment licensed to sell alcoholic drinks, which traditionally include beer and cider. It is a social drinking establishment and a prominent part of British, Irish, Breton, New Zealand, Canadian, South African and Australian cultures. In many places, especially in villages, a pub is the focal point of the community. In his 17th-century diary Samuel Pepys described the pub as "the heart of England".

Playing career

International honours

Tommy Smales won a cap for England while at Huddersfield in 1962 against France, [3] and won caps for Great Britain while at Huddersfield in 1962 against France, in 1963 against France, and Australia, in 1964 against France (2 matches), and while at Bradford Northern in 1965 against New Zealand (3 matches). [4]

Cap (sport) sports game between two national teams

In sport, a cap is a metaphorical term for a player's appearance in a game at international level. The term dates from the practice in the United Kingdom of awarding a cap to every player in an international match of association football. In the early days of football, the concept of each team wearing a set of matching shirts had not been universally adopted, so each side would distinguish itself from the other by wearing a specific sort of cap.

England national rugby league team sportsteam that represents England

The England national rugby league team represents England in international rugby league.

Championship Final appearances

Tommy Smales played scrum-half, and was captain in Huddersfield's 14-5 victory over Wakefield Trinity in the Championship Final during the 1961–62 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Saturday 19 May 1962. [9]

Captain (sports) member of a sports team

In team sport, captain is a title given to a member of the team. The title is frequently honorary, but in some cases the captain may have significant responsibility for strategy and teamwork while the game is in progress on the field. In either case, it is a position that indicates honor and respect from one's teammates – recognition as a leader by one's peers. In association football and cricket, a captain is also known as a skipper.

Huddersfield Giants Rugby league club in Huddersfield, England

The Huddersfield Giants are an English professional rugby league club from Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, the birthplace of rugby league, who play in the Super League competition. They play their home games at the John Smiths Stadium which is shared with Huddersfield Town F.C.. Huddersfield is also one of the original twenty-two rugby clubs that formed the Northern Rugby Football Union in 1895, making them one of the world's first rugby league teams. The club was founded in 1864 and is the world's oldest professional rugby league club. They have won 7 Championships and 6 Challenge Cups, but have not won a major trophy since 1962, some 53 years ago.

Wakefield Trinity English rugby league club

Wakefield Trinity is a professional rugby league club in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England, that plays in the Super League. One of the original twenty-two clubs that formed the Northern Rugby Football Union in 1895, between 1999 and 2016 the club was known as Wakefield Trinity Wildcats. The club has played at Belle Vue Stadium in Wakefield since 1895 and has rivalries with Castleford Tigers and Featherstone Rovers. Wakefield have won two premierships in their history when they went back to back in 1967 and 1968. As of 2019, it has been 51 years since Wakefield last won the league.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Tommy Smales played scrum-half, and was captain in Huddersfield's 6-12 defeat by Wakefield Trinity in the 1961–62 Challenge Cup Final during the 1961–62 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 12 May 1962, in front of a crowd of 81,263. [10]

The 1961–62 Challenge Cup was the 61st staging of rugby league's oldest knockout competition, the Challenge Cup.

The Challenge Cup is a knockout rugby league cup competition organised by the Rugby Football League, held annually since 1896, with the exception of 1915–1919 and 1939–1940. It involves amateur, semi-professional and professional clubs.

Wembley Stadium (1923) former stadium in London, England which opened in 1923

The original Wembley Stadium was a football stadium in Wembley Park, London, which stood on the same site now occupied by its successor, the new Wembley Stadium. The demolition in 2003 of its famous Twin Towers upset many people worldwide. Debris from the stadium was used to make the Northala Fields in Northolt, London.

County Cup Final appearances

Tommy Smales played scrum-half, and scored a try in Huddersfield's 15-8 victory over York in the 1957–58 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1957–58 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 19 October 1957, [11] played scrum-half in the 10-16 defeat by Wakefield Trinity in the 1960–61 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1960–61 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 29 October 1960, and played scrum-half in Bradford Northern's 17-8 victory over Hunslet in the 1965–66 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1965–66 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 16 October 1965.

Try way of scoring points in rugby league and rugby union football

A try is a way of scoring points in rugby union and rugby league football. A try is scored by grounding the ball in the opposition's in-goal area. Rugby union and league differ slightly in defining 'grounding the ball' and the 'in-goal' area.

York City Knights English professional rugby league club based in York

The York City Knights are an English professional rugby league club based in York. They play their home games at Bootham Crescent where they ground share with York City F.C.. In the 2016 season they played in League 1. In 2018 the club succeeded in winning all their matches except two and were crowned league champions, earning immediate promotion to the Championship league. The current club was formed in 2002 after the original club folded.

The RFL Yorkshire Cup is a rugby league county cup competition for teams in Yorkshire. Starting in 1905 the competition ran, with the exception of 1915 to 1918, until the 1992–93 season, when it folded due to fixture congestion, until being revived for the 2019 season, with a new trophy.

Club career

Tommy Smales made his début for Featherstone Rovers on Saturday 25 September 1965, [12] he appears to have scored no drop-goals (or field-goals as they are currently known in Australasia), but prior to the 1974–75 season all goals, whether; conversions, penalties, or drop-goals, scored 2-points, consequently prior to this date drop-goals were often not explicitly documented, therefore '0' drop-goals may indicate drop-goals not recorded, rather than no drop-goals scored.

Coaching career

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Tommy Smales was the coach in Castleford's 7-2 victory over Wigan in the 1969–70 Challenge Cup Final during the 1969–70 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 9 May 1970, in front of a crowd of 95,255. [13]

Club career

Tommy Smales was the coach of Castleford, his first game in charge was on Sunday 3 August 1969, and his last game in charge was on Saturday 28 November 1970. [6]

Genealogical information

Tommy Smales was the uncle of the rugby league footballer; Dale Fennell.

Note

Somewhat confusingly, Tommy Smales played in the same era as the unrelated Wigan, Barrow and Featherstone Rovers loose forward of the 1950s and 1960s, Thomas "Tommy" Smales.

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References

  1. Gronow, David (2008). Huddersfield Rugby League Football Club: 100 Greats. The History Press. pp. 104–5. ISBN   978-0-7524-4584-7.
  2. "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 29 June 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  4. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 29 June 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  5. "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  6. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at thecastlefordtigers.co.uk". thecastlefordtigers.co.uk ℅ web.archive.org. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 13 August 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  7. "'Rugby pub' is likely to re-start business". Yorkshire Evening Post. 5 March 2007. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  8. "Former rugby coach and player passes away". Pontefractandcastlefordexpress.co.uk. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
  9. Edgar, Harry (2008). Rugby League Journal Annual 2009 [Page-57]. Rugby League Journal Publishing. ISBN   978-0-9548355-4-5
  10. Briggs, Cyril & Edwards, Barry (12 May 1962). The Rugby League Challenge Cup Competition - Final Tie - Huddersfield v Wakefield Trinity - Match Programme. Wembley Stadium Ltd. ISBN n/a
  11. "Programme 'Yorkshire County Rugby League - Challenge Cup Final - 1957 - Huddersfield v. York'" (PDF). huddersfieldrlheritage.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  12. Bailey, Ron (20 September 2001). Images of Sport - Featherstone Rovers Rugby League Football Club. The History Press. ISBN   0752422952
  13. "Sat 9th May 1970 – Challenge Cup – Neutral Ground – 95,255". Thecastlefordtigers. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 16 February 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2012.