Thomas Smart (New South Wales politician)

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Thomas Ware Smart (1810 – 28 May 1881), was a politician in colonial New South Wales, Colonial Treasurer in 1863 and 1865. [1]

Colony of New South Wales British colony which later became a state of Australia

The Colony of New South Wales was a colony of the British Empire from 1788 to 1900, when it became a State of the Commonwealth of Australia. At its greatest extent, the colony of New South Wales included the present-day Australian states of New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia, the Northern Territory as well as New Zealand. The first "responsible" self-government of New South Wales was formed on 6 June 1856 with Sir Stuart Alexander Donaldson appointed by Governor Sir William Denison as its first Colonial Secretary.

Treasurer of New South Wales

The Treasurer of New South Wales, known from 1856 to 1959 as the Colonial Treasurer of New South Wales, is the minister in the Government of New South Wales responsible for government expenditure and revenue raising and is the head of the New South Wales Treasury. The Treasurer plays a key role in the economic policy of the government.

Smart was born in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. He was the representative for Sydney Hamlets in the New South Wales Legislative Council from 1 September 1851 to 28 February 1855. [2] He represented Glebe in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1860 to 1869. [1] He was Treasurer from 21 March to 15 October 1863 and from 3 February to 19 October 1865; he was also Secretary for Public Works from 20 October 1865 to 21 January 1866. He was again appointed to the Legislative Council in 1870 and served until his death. [2]

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In September 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

The Electoral district of Sydney Hamlets was an electorate of the New South Wales Legislative Council at a time when some of its members were elected and the balance were appointed by the Governor. It was a new electorate created in 1851 by the expansion of the Legislative Council to 54 members, with 18 to be appointed and 36 elected. The electoral district included what were then outer suburbs of Sydney and are now the inner suburbs of Glebe, Camperdown, O'Connell Town, Chippendale, Redfern, Surry Hills, Paddington, St Leonards and Balmain.

New South Wales Legislative Council Upper house of the Parliament of New South Wales

The New South Wales Legislative Council, often referred to as the upper house, is one of the two chambers of the parliament of the Australian state of New South Wales. The other is the Legislative Assembly. Both sit at Parliament House in the state capital, Sydney. It is normal for legislation to be first deliberated on and passed by the Legislative Assembly before being considered by the Legislative Council, which acts in the main as a house of review.

Smart died at Darling Point in Sydney on May 28, 1881(1881-05-28) (aged 70–71). [1]

Darling Point, New South Wales Suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Darling Point is a harbourside eastern suburb of Sydney, Australia. It is 4 kilometres east of the Sydney central business district and is part of the local government area of Woollahra Council.

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Thomas Smart may refer to:

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Walsh, G P. "Smart, Thomas Ware (1810–1881)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 21 August 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Mr Thomas Ware Smart (1810-1881)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 21 April 2019.

 

Political offices
Preceded by
Elias Weekes
Colonial Treasurer
Mar - Oct 1863
Succeeded by
Geoffrey Eagar
Preceded by
Geoffrey Eagar
Colonial Treasurer
Feb - Oct 1865
Succeeded by
Saul Samuel
Preceded by
William Arnold
Secretary for Public Works
Oct 1865 - Jan 1866
Succeeded by
Arthur Holroyd
New South Wales Legislative Council
Preceded by
Sir George Allen
Member for Sydney Hamlets
Sep 1851 – Feb 1855
Succeeded by
Stuart Donaldson
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
John Campbell
Member for Glebe
Dec 1860 – Nov 1869
Succeeded by
Sir George Allen