Thomas Smith (Cavalier)

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Thomas Smith or Smyth

Thomas and Florence Smyth 1627.jpg

Thomas Smith (right) with his wife Florence (left) in 1627
Successor Hugh Smith
Born(1609-06-00)June 1609
Died 2 October 1642(1642-10-02) (aged 33)
Spouse Florence Poulet
Issue
Detail
Hugh Smith
Father Hugh Smith
Mother Marquess Elizabeth Gorges

Thomas Smith or Smyth (June 1609 – 2 October 1642) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1628 and 1642. He fought for the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Smith, of Long Ashton in Somerset, was the eldest son of Sir Hugh Smith (1574–1627) and his wife Marquess Elizabeth Gorges daughter of Sir Thomas Gorges of Lanford. He was head of wealthy Somerset family, descended from a 16th-century Mayor of Bristol.

Long Ashton village in the United Kingdom

Long Ashton is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England. It falls within the Unitary Authority of North Somerset and is one of a number of large villages just outside the boundary of city of Bristol urban area. The parish has a population of 6,044. The parish includes the hamlet of Yanley, and the residential area of Leigh Woods.

Somerset County of England

Somerset is a county in South West England which borders Gloucestershire and Bristol to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east and Devon to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary and the Bristol Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales. Its traditional border with Gloucestershire is the River Avon. Somerset's county town is Taunton.

Sir Thomas Gorges was an Elizabethan courtier and Groom of the Chamber to Queen Elizabeth I. By his great-grandmother, Lady Anne Howard, daughter of John Howard, 1st Duke of Norfolk, he was a second cousin of queens consort Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard.

In 1628, Smith was elected Member of Parliament for Bridgwater and sat until 1629 when King Charles decided to rule without parliament for eleven years. In April 1640, he was elected MP for Somerset in the Short Parliament. He was elected MP for Bridgwater again in the Long Parliament from February 1641 until August 1642, when he was disabled from sitting for his sympathies. He joined the Marquess of Hertford's royal army, and was serving with that force when he died at Cardiff in October 1642.

Bridgwater (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885-2010

Bridgwater was a parliamentary constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, until 2010 when it was replaced by the Bridgwater and West Somerset constituency. It elected one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election.

Somerset was a parliamentary constituency in Somerset, which returned two Members of Parliament (MPs), known traditionally as knights of the shire, to the House of Commons of England until 1707, the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Smith married Florence Poulett (died 1677), daughter of Lord Poulett, on 12 April 1627. After the Restoration their son, Hugh (1632–1680), was created a baronet.

John Poulett, 1st Baron Poulett English politician and Baron

John Poulett, 1st Baron Poulett, of Hinton St George, Somerset, was an English sailor and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1610 and 1621 and was later raised to the peerage.

Sir Hugh Smith, 1st Baronet Member of Parliament, died 1680

Sir Hugh Smith, 1st Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1660 and 1679.

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