Thomas Smyth (Limerick MP)

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Thomas Smyth (1740 – 14 January 1785) was an Irish politician.

Ireland Island in north-west Europe, 20th largest in world, politically divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the UK)

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

Contents

Life

He was Mayor of Limerick twice (1764 and 1776) and Member of Parliament for Limerick City from 1776 until his death. He was appointed High Sheriff of County Limerick for 1770. He was also Colonel of the Limerick Militia.

The office of Mayor of the City and County of Limerick is currently the title used by the chairpeson of Limerick City and County Council. Prior to the establishment of the Council, the Mayor of Limerick was the chairperson of Limerick City Council. The office was originally established in 1195 and reinforced by a charter issued in 1197.

Limerick City was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800.

The High Sheriff of Limerick was the British Crown's judicial representative in County Limerick, Ireland from the 16th century until 1922, when the office was abolished in the new Free State and replaced by the office of Limerick County Sheriff. The sheriff had judicial, electoral, ceremonial and administrative functions and executed High Court Writs. In 1908, an Order in Council made the Lord-Lieutenant the Sovereign's prime representative in a county and reduced the High Sheriff's precedence. However the sheriff retained his responsibilities for the preservation of law and order in the county. The usual procedure for appointing the sheriff from 1660 onwards was that three persons were nominated at the beginning of each year from the county and the Lord Lieutenant then appointed his choice as High Sheriff for the remainder of the year. Often the other nominees were appointed as under-sheriffs. Sometimes a sheriff did not fulfil his entire term through death or other event and another sheriff was then appointed for the remainder of the year. The dates given hereunder are the dates of appointment. All addresses are in County Limerick unless stated otherwise.

He was succeeded in the constituency and in militia by his brother John Prendergast Smyth. John had also inherited the estates of their uncle, Sir Thomas Prendergast, 2nd Baronet, even though Thomas was the oldest son. John was later ennobled as the first Viscount Gort.

John Prendergast-Smyth, 1st Viscount Gort was an Irish politician.

Sir Thomas Prendergast, 2nd Baronet was the eldest son of Sir Thomas Prendergast, 1st Baronet, and his wife Penelope Cadogan, sister of William Cadogan, 1st Earl Cadogan. He succeeded his father to the baronetcy in 1709. He was elected to the Irish House of Commons for Clonmel (1727–1760) and to the British House of Commons as Member of Parliament for Chichester (1733–1734).

Viscount Gort is the title of two peerages in British and Irish history. Gort is a small town in County Galway in the West of Ireland. The original title was in the Peerage of Ireland and is extant. A viscountcy with the same title as the Irish peerage was then conferred in the Peerage of the United Kingdom to a later Lord Gort. This gave the distinguished descendant a subtle personal change of status, whilst preserving the heritage of the older title. The United Kingdom title, however, became extinct on death of the original recipient, who remains perhaps the most illustrious bearer of the older title to date. A post-World War II unqualified reference to "Lord Gort" will almost always be to the sixth viscount.

Family

He was the eldest son of Charles Smyth, Member of Parliament for Limerick City, and Elizabeth Prendergast (born 1708). His paternal grandparents were the Rt. Rev. Thomas Smyth (1650–1725), Bishop of Limerick, and Dorothea Burgh (daughter of the Rt. Reverend Ulysses Burgh, Bishop of Ardagh) and his paternal uncle was the Most Reverend Arthur Smyth (1707–1772), Archbishop of Dublin. His maternal grandparents were Brig. Sir Thomas Prendergast, 1st Baronet, who was killed in action at the Battle of Malplaquet in 1709, and Penelope Cadogan, sister of William Cadogan, 1st Earl Cadogan.

Thomas Smyth was an Irish bishop in the last decade of the 17th century and the first three of the 18th.

Bishop of Limerick Wikimedia list article

The Bishop of Limerick is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Limerick in the Province of Munster, Ireland. In the Roman Catholic Church it still continues as a separate title, but in the Church of Ireland it has been united with other bishoprics.

Ulysses Burgh (1632-1692) was an Irish Anglican bishop in the 17th century.

Thomas Smyth died unmarried, but fathered four children, all of whom bore the surname Stuart, including the Indian Army officer, Major-General Charles Stuart, better known as the "Hindoo Stuart".

Further reading

Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
Edmund Sexton Pery
Charles Smyth
Member of Parliament for Limerick City
1776–1785
With: Edmund Sexton Pery
Succeeded by
John Prendergast Smyth
Edmund Henry Pery

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