Thomas Southey Baker

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Thomas Southey Baker (29 June 1848 – 24 June 1902) [1] was an amateur sportsman who was on the winning crew that won The Boat Race in 1869 and played for England in the fourth unofficial football match against Scotland in November 1871. [2] He subsequently became a teacher at Dunedin in New Zealand. [3] He was the father of Eleanor Southey Baker McLaglan, a pioneering surgeon in New Zealand. [1]

Contents

Early life and education

Baker was born in Droxford, Hampshire, the son of Dr Thomas Baker and his wife, Sophia Jane Southey. [1] Baker attended Lancing College between 1861 and 1867, where he played both football and cricket [4] for the school. He was considered the "outstanding athlete of his generation" at Lancing College and his sporting abilities resulted in him twice being crowned victor ludorum by the college. [3]

In 1867, Baker went up to Queen's College, Oxford. At Oxford, he rowed three times in The Boat Race against Cambridge, being on the winning side in 1869 [5] [6] and losing in 1870 [7] and 1871, [8] and also played football for the University. [2]

Baker graduated from Oxford University in 1871, with a Bachelor of Arts degree. [1]

Football career

He later played football for Clapham Rovers, alongside R.S.F. Walker and Jarvis Kenrick, all of whom were selected to play for the England XI against a Scotland XI at The Surrey Cricket Ground, The Oval, Kennington on 18 November 1871. [2] This was the fourth unofficial match between the two countries, which England won 2–1, with Walker scoring both England's goals. [9]

Teaching career

On graduating from Oxford, Baker was briefly a school master at Whitgift School in Croydon, before emigrating to New Zealand in 1873. [1] He sailed to New Zealand on board the SS Dallam Tower . [3] The ship eventually reached Port Chalmers, New Zealand, after a dramatic voyage in which she lost a mast and travelled 2,000 miles under a jury rig. [10] [11]

Baker had originally planned to set up business in the flax industry but instead he established a private school at French Farm, at Akaroa near Christchurch. [3] He continued to maintain his interest in sport, winning the athletics championship at Timaru in 1878 and playing cricket for Canterbury [3] between 1874 and 1880. [12] [13]

In 1890, he moved to Tasmania, where he taught for two years at Christ College, before returning to New Zealand in 1892. He then established the Goodwood House prep school at Otago. [3] In 1896, he became manager of a boarding house at Otago Boys' High School, Dunedin; his contract gave him the right to conduct his own school on the premises. [3] Baker remained at Dunedin until he died in June 1902. [3] He was buried in Dunedin Northern Cemetery. [14]

Family

Baker married Josephine Dicken in 1878 and they had four daughters including Eleanor, the eldest, who became a doctor and surgeon in remote areas of New Zealand's North Island. [15]

Related Research Articles

Eleanor Southey Baker McLaglan was a New Zealand doctor. She was born in French Farm, at Akaroa near Christchurch, New Zealand on 13 September 1879.

The 15th Boat Race took place on the River Thames on 27 March 1858. Typically held annually, the event is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. The 1858 race, disrupted by poor rowing and a collision with a barge, was won by Cambridge, who defeated Oxford by ​7 12 lengths in a time of 21 minutes 23 seconds.

The 26th Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on 17 March 1869. Oxford won by three lengths in a time of 20 minutes and 4 seconds. It was their ninth consecutive victory and was, at that point, the fastest time ever recorded in the event.

The Boat Race 1870 1870 boat race between Oxford and Cambridge universities

The 27th Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on the 6 April 1870. Cambridge won by ​1 12 lengths in a time of 22 minutes 4 seconds, their first victory since the 1860 race.

The 55th Boat Race took place on 24 March 1898. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Oxford, the reigning champions and leading overall, went into the race with a marginally heavier crew than Cambridge. They won "easily" as Cambridge's boat became waterlogged in strong winds and inclement conditions. It was their ninth consecutive victory and took them to an overall lead of 32–22 in the event. The winning time of 22 minutes 15 seconds was the slowest since the 1878 race.

The 69th Boat Race took place on 30 March 1912 with a re-row on 1 April. Held annually, the event is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Oxford went into the race as reigning champions, having won the previous year's race. Umpired by former Cambridge rower Frederick I. Pitman, this year's race ended with Cambridge sinking and Oxford waterlogged. Pitman declared the result as "No Race" and in the subsequent re-row on the following Monday, the race was won by Oxford by six lengths. The Dark Blues' fourth consecutive victory took the overall record in the event to 38–30 in their favour.

The 28th Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on the 1 April 1871. The race, umpired by Joseph William Chitty, was won by Cambridge by one length in a time of 23 minutes 10 seconds for their second consecutive victory.

The 29th Boat Race took place on the 27 March 1872. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by Robert Lewis-Lloyd, Cambridge won by two lengths in a time of 21 minutes 15 seconds taking the overall record to 16–13 in Oxford's favour.

The 30th Boat Race took place on the 29 March 1873. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by former Oxford rower Joseph William Chitty, Cambridge won by three lengths in a time of 19 minutes and 35 seconds, the fastest time in the history of the event. It was the first time that rowers raced on sliding seats.

The 31st Boat Race took place on the 28 March 1874. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by former Oxford rower Joseph William Chitty, Cambridge won by three and a half lengths in their fifth consecutive victory.

The 32nd Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on the 20 March 1875. The Cambridge crew contained four Blues to Oxford's two, the latter went into the race without a win since the 1869 race. In a race umpired by Joseph William Chitty, Oxford won by ten lengths in a time of 22 minutes 2 seconds, taking the overall record in the event to 17–15 in their favour. One of the Cambridge crew broke his slide during the race.

The 40th Boat Race, an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames, took place on 15 March 1883. Following confusion at the start of the race and a snow storm during the event, Oxford won by a margin of ​3 12 lengths in a time of 21 minutes 18 seconds.

The 45th Boat Race took place on 24 March 1888. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In the race umpired by Robert Lewis-Lloyd for the final time, Cambridge won by seven lengths in a time of 20 minutes 48 seconds.

The 46th Boat Race took place on 30 March 1889. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. For the first time in the history of the event, all eight rowers in the Cambridge crew had rowed the previous year. Cambridge won by three lengths in a time of 20 minutes 14 seconds, their fourth consecutive victory which took the overall record in the event to 23–22 in Oxford's favour.

The 55th Boat Race took place on 25 March 1899. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Cambridge won, their first success in a decade, by ​3 14 lengths in a time of 21 minutes 4 seconds. The victory took the overall record in the event to 32–23 in Oxford's favour.

The 57th Boat Race took place on 31 March 1900. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Cambridge won by twenty lengths in a record-equalling time of 18 minutes 45 seconds, taking the overall record in the event to 32–24 in Oxford's favour.

The 59th Boat Race took place on 22 March 1902. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Although Oxford used swivel rowlocks for the first time in the history of the race, Cambridge won by five lengths in a time of 19 minutes 9 seconds. The victory took the overall record to 33–25 in Oxford's favour.

The 61st Boat Race took place on 26 March 1904. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Neither boat club president was able to row through injury. In a race umpired by former rower Frederick I. Pitman, Cambridge won by ​4 12 lengths in a time of 21 minutes 37 seconds. Their third victory in a row, it took the overall record in the event to 33–27 in Oxford's favour.

The 79th Boat Race took place on 2 April 1927. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Oxford's crew was marginally heavier than their opponents, and saw five participants return with Boat Race experience, compared to Cambridge's four. Umpired for the first time by former Oxford rower Charles Burnell, Cambridge won by three lengths in a time of 20 minutes 14 seconds. It was the first race in the history of the event to be broadcast live on BBC Radio. The victory took the overall record in the event to 40–38 in Oxford's favour. The inaugural Women's Boat Race was contested this year, with Oxford securing the victory.

The 80th Boat Race took place on 28 March 1928. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by former Oxford rower Charles Burnell, Cambridge won by ten lengths, the largest margin of victory since 1900, in a time of 20 minutes 25 seconds. The victory took the overall record to 40–39 in Oxford's favour.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Mitchell 2012, p. 106.
  2. 1 2 3 "Unofficial International No. 4". www.englandfootballonline.com. 18 November 1871. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Mitchell 2012, p. 78.
  4. "Miscellaneous Matches Played By Thomas Baker". Cricket Archive. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  5. Burnell 1979, p. 59.
  6. MacMichael 1870, p. 356.
  7. Drinkwater & Sanders 1929, p. 64.
  8. Burnell 1979, p. 60.
  9. "England v. Scotland". www.londonhearts.com. 18 November 1871. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  10. Brett, Henry (1924). White Wings vol 1: Fifty years of sail in the New Zealand Trade, 1850–1900. New Zealand Electronic Text Centre. pp. 77–81.
  11. "The British Ship Dallam Tower in a Gale off St Paul's Island: wood engraving, 9 September 1873". State Library of Victoria. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  12. "Thomas Southey Baker". CricketArchive. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  13. "Thomas Baker". ESPNcricinfo.
  14. Northern Cemetery plot records
  15. Tennant, Margaret. "Eleanor Southey Baker McLaglan". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 8 December 2014.

Bibliography