Thomas Southey Baker

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Thomas Southey Baker (29 June 1848 – 24 June 1902) [1] was an amateur sportsman who was on the winning crew that won The Boat Race in 1869 and played for England in the fourth unofficial football match against Scotland in November 1871. [2] He subsequently became a teacher at Dunedin in New Zealand. [3] He was the father of Eleanor Southey Baker McLaglan, a pioneering surgeon in New Zealand. [1]

The Boat Race annual rowing race on the River Thames

The Boat Race is an annual rowing race between the Oxford University Boat Club and the Cambridge University Boat Club, rowed between men's and women's open-weight eights on the River Thames in London, England. It is also known as the University Boat Race and the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race.

Between 1870 and 1872, the Football Association (FA) organised five representative association football matches between teams representing England and Scotland, all held in London. The first of these matches was held at The Oval on 5 March 1870, and the fifth was on 21 February 1872. The matches, which were organised by Charles W. Alcock, are the precursors to modern international football and were referred to as internationals at the time. They are not recognised, however, as full internationals by FIFA as the players competing in the Scotland team were drawn only from London-based Scottish players. They were followed by the 1872 match in Glasgow between Scotland and England which is recognised as the first international match.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

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Early life and education

Baker was born in Droxford, Hampshire, the son of Dr Thomas Baker and his wife, Sophia Jane Southey. [1] Baker attended Lancing College between 1861 and 1867, where he played both football and cricket [4] for the school. He was considered the "outstanding athlete of his generation" at Lancing College and his sporting abilities resulted in him twice being crowned victor ludorum by the college. [3]

Droxford village and civil parish in Hampshire, England

Droxford is a village in Hampshire, England.

Hampshire County of England

Hampshire is a county on the southern coast of England. The county town, with city status, is Winchester, a frequent seat of the Royal Court before any fixed capital, in late Anglo-Saxon England. After the metropolitan counties and Greater London, Hampshire is the most populous ceremonial county in the United Kingdom. Its two largest settlements, Southampton and Portsmouth, are administered separately as unitary authorities and the rest of the area forms the administrative county, which is governed by Hampshire County Council.

Lancing College

Lancing College is an independent boarding and day school in southern England, UK. The school is located in West Sussex, east of Worthing near the village of Lancing, on the south coast of England. Lancing was founded in 1848 by Nathaniel Woodard and educates c. 550 pupils between the ages of 13 and 18; the co-educational ratio is c. 60:40 boys to girls. Girls were admitted in 1971.

In 1867, Baker went up to Queen's College, Oxford. At Oxford, he rowed three times in The Boat Race against Cambridge, being on the winning side in 1869 [5] [6] and losing in 1870 [7] and 1871, [8] and also played football for the University. [2]

The Queens College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

The Queen's College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford, England. The college was founded in 1341 by Robert de Eglesfield (d'Eglesfield) in honour of Queen Philippa of Hainault. It is distinguished by its predominantly neoclassical architecture, which includes buildings designed by Sir Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor.

University of Oxford Collegiate research university in Oxford, England

The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two 'ancient universities' are frequently jointly referred to as 'Oxbridge'. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

The 26th Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on 17 March 1869. Oxford won by three lengths in a time of 20 minutes and 4 seconds. It was their ninth consecutive victory and was, at that point, the fastest time ever recorded in the event.

Baker graduated from Oxford University in 1871, with a Bachelor of Arts degree. [1]

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Football career

He later played football for Clapham Rovers, alongside R.S.F. Walker and Jarvis Kenrick, all of whom were selected to play for the England XI against a Scotland XI at The Surrey Cricket Ground, The Oval, Kennington on 18 November 1871. [2] This was the fourth unofficial match between the two countries, which England won 2–1, with Walker scoring both England's goals. [9]

Clapham Rovers was from its foundation in 1869 a leading English sports organisation in the two dominant codes of football, association football and rugby union. It was a prominent club in the late 19th century but is now defunct. The club played variously on Clapham Common, Tooting Bec Common and Wandsworth Common and wore a cerise and French-grey kit.

Jarvis Kenrick was an English footballer.

The Oval cricket ground in Kennington, South London

The Oval, currently known under naming rights as the Kia Oval, is an international cricket ground in Kennington, in the London Borough of Lambeth, in south London. The Oval has been the home ground of Surrey County Cricket Club since it was opened in 1845. It was the first ground in England to host international Test cricket in September 1880. The final Test match of the English season is traditionally played there.

Teaching career

On graduating from Oxford, Baker was briefly a school master at Whitgift School in Croydon, before emigrating to New Zealand in 1873. [1] He sailed to New Zealand on board the SS Dallam Tower . [3] The ship eventually reached Port Chalmers, New Zealand, after a dramatic voyage in which she lost a mast and travelled 2,000 miles under a jury rig. [10] [11]

Whitgift School School in South Croydon, London

Whitgift School is an independent day school with limited boarding in South Croydon, London. Along with Trinity School of John Whitgift and Old Palace School it is owned by the Whitgift Foundation, a charitable trust. The school's headmaster is a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference.

Croydon town in South London, England

Croydon is a large town in south London, England, 9.5 miles (15.3 km) south of Charing Cross. The principal settlement in the London Borough of Croydon, it is one of the largest commercial districts outside Central London, with an extensive shopping district and night-time economy.

Dallam Tower Grade I listed English country house in South Lakeland, United Kingdom

Dallam Tower is a grade I listed country house in Beetham parish, near Milnthorpe, South Lakeland, Cumbria, England. It is a member of the Historic Houses Association but is not open to the public except for occasional charity events, visits to the garden through the National Gardens Scheme, and as a wedding venue.

Baker had originally planned to set up business in the flax industry but instead he established a private school at French Farm, at Akaroa near Christchurch. [3] He continued to maintain his interest in sport, winning the athletics championship at Timaru in 1878 and playing cricket for Canterbury [3] between 1874 and 1880. [12] [13]

In 1890, he moved to Tasmania, where he taught for two years at Christ College, before returning to New Zealand in 1892. He then established the Goodwood House prep school at Otago. [3] In 1896, he became manager of a boarding house at Otago Boys' High School, Dunedin; his contract gave him the right to conduct his own school on the premises. [3] Baker remained at Dunedin until he died in June 1902. [3] He was buried in Dunedin Northern Cemetery. [14]

Family

Baker married Josephine Dicken in 1878 and they had four daughters including Eleanor, the eldest, who became a doctor and surgeon in remote areas of New Zealand's North Island. [15]

Related Research Articles

Eleanor Southey Baker McLaglan was a New Zealand doctor. She was born in French Farm, at Akaroa near Christchurch, New Zealand on 13 September 1879.

The 2nd Boat Race took place on the River Thames on 17 June 1836. It was the first of the University Boat Races to be held in London, on a five-and-three-quarter-mile stretch between Westminster and Putney. For the first time, Cambridge sported light blue livery in the form of a ribbon on their boat while Oxford rowed in dark blue jerseys. In a race umpired by Lord Loftus and Mr Hiceson, Cambridge won the race by 20 lengths to level the overall record at 1–1.

The 16th Boat Race took place on 15 April 1859. Held annually, the event is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. After Cambridge's request for a postponement due to extremely rough conditions was rejected, Oxford won the race after Cambridge sank. It was the first time in the history of the event that one of the crews did not finish the race.

The 15th Boat Race took place on the River Thames on 27 March 1858. Typically held annually, the event is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. The 1858 race, disrupted by poor rowing and a collision with a barge, was won by Cambridge who defeated Oxford by seven-and-a-half lengths in a time of 21 minutes 23 seconds.

The Boat Race 1870 1870 boat race between Oxford and Cambridge universities

The 27th Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on the 6 April 1870. Cambridge won by one-and-a-half lengths in a time of 22 minutes 4 seconds, their first victory since the 1860 race.

The 55th Boat Race took place on 24 March 1898. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Oxford, the reigning champions and leading overall, went into the race with a marginally heavier crew than Cambridge. They won "easily" as Cambridge's boat became waterlogged in strong winds and inclement conditions. It was their ninth consecutive victory and took them to an overall lead of 32–22 in the event. The winning time of 22 minutes 15 seconds was the slowest since the 1878 race.

The 28th Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on the 1 April 1871. The race, umpired by Joseph William Chitty, was won by Cambridge by one length in a time of 23 minutes 10 seconds for their second consecutive victory.

The 29th Boat Race took place on the 27 March 1872. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by Robert Lewis-Lloyd, Cambridge won by two lengths in a time of 21 minutes 15 seconds taking the overall record to 16–13 in Oxford's favour.

The 30th Boat Race took place on the 29 March 1873. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by former Oxford rower Joseph William Chitty, Cambridge won by three lengths in a time of 19 minutes and 35 seconds, the fastest time in the history of the event. It was the first time that rowers raced on sliding seats.

The 31st Boat Race took place on the 28 March 1874. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by former Oxford rower Joseph William Chitty, Cambridge won by three and a half lengths in their fifth consecutive victory.

The 32nd Boat Race between crews from the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge took place on the River Thames on the 20 March 1875. The Cambridge crew contained four Blues to Oxford's two, the latter went into the race without a win since the 1869 race. In a race umpired by Joseph William Chitty, Oxford won by ten lengths in a time of 22 minutes 2 seconds, taking the overall record in the event to 17–15 in their favour. One of the Cambridge crew broke his slide during the race.

The 37th Boat Race, an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames, took place on 22 March 1880 following a postponement two days earlier as a result of thick fog. It is the only time in the history of the event that the race has been rescheduled. Oxford won by a margin of three-and-three-quarter lengths in a time of 21 minutes 23 seconds.

The 40th Boat Race, an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames, took place on 15 March 1883. Following confusion at the start of the race and a snow storm during the event, Oxford won by a margin of three-and-a-half lengths in a time of 21 minutes 18 seconds.

The 45th Boat Race took place on 24 March 1888. The Boat Race is an annual side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In the race umpired by Robert Lewis-Lloyd for the final time, Cambridge won by seven lengths in a time of 20 minutes 48 seconds.

The 55th Boat Race took place on 25 March 1899. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Cambridge won, their first success in a decade, by three-and-a-quarter lengths in a time of 21 minutes 4 seconds. The victory took the overall record in the event to 32–23 in Oxford's favour.

The 59th Boat Race took place on 22 March 1902. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Although Oxford used swivel rowlocks for the first time in the history of the race, Cambridge won by five lengths in a time of 19 minutes 9 seconds. The victory took the overall record to 33–25 in Oxford's favour.

The 61st Boat Race took place on 26 March 1904. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Neither boat club president was able to row through injury. In a race umpired by former rower Frederick I. Pitman, Cambridge won by four-and-a-half lengths in a time of 21 minutes 37 seconds. Their third victory in a row, it took the overall record in the event to 33–27 in Oxford's favour.

The 76th Boat Race took place on 5 April 1924. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Oxford were reigning champions having won the previous year's race and their crew was significantly heavier than their opponents for this year's race. Umpired by former rower Frederick I. Pitman, Cambridge won by four-and-a-half lengths in a time of 18 minutes 41 seconds, the fastest time since 1911. The victory took the overall record in the event to 40–35 in Oxford's favour.

The 79th Boat Race took place on 2 April 1927. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. Oxford's crew was marginally heavier than their opponents, and saw five participants return with Boat Race experience, compared to Cambridge's four. Umpired for the first time by former Oxford rower Charles Burnell, Cambridge won by three lengths in a time of 20 minutes 14 seconds. It was the first race in the history of the event to be broadcast live on BBC Radio. The victory took the overall record in the event to 40–38 in Oxford's favour. The inaugural Women's Boat Race was contested this year, with Oxford securing the victory.

The 80th Boat Race took place on 28 March 1928. Held annually, the Boat Race is a side-by-side rowing race between crews from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge along the River Thames. In a race umpired by former Oxford rower Charles Burnell, Cambridge won by ten lengths, the largest margin of victory since 1900, in a time of 20 minutes 25 seconds. The victory took the overall record to 40–39 in Oxford's favour.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Mitchell 2012, p. 106.
  2. 1 2 3 "Unofficial International No. 4". www.englandfootballonline.com. 18 November 1871. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Mitchell 2012, p. 78.
  4. "Miscellaneous Matches Played By Thomas Baker". Cricket Archive. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  5. Burnell 1979, p. 59.
  6. MacMichael 1870, p. 356.
  7. Drinkwater & Sanders 1929, p. 64.
  8. Burnell 1979, p. 60.
  9. "England v. Scotland". www.londonhearts.com. 18 November 1871. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  10. Brett, Henry (1924). White Wings vol 1: Fifty years of sail in the New Zealand Trade, 1850–1900. New Zealand Electronic Text Centre. pp. 77–81.
  11. "The British Ship Dallam Tower in a Gale off St Paul's Island: wood engraving, 9 September 1873". State Library of Victoria. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  12. "Thomas Southey Baker". CricketArchive. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  13. "Thomas Baker". ESPNcricinfo.
  14. Northern Cemetery plot records
  15. Tennant, Margaret. "Eleanor Southey Baker McLaglan". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography . Ministry for Culture and Heritage . Retrieved 8 December 2014.

Bibliography