Thomas Southwell

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Thomas Southwell may refer to:

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Viscount Southwell, of Castle Mattress in the County of Limerick, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1776 for Thomas Southwell, 3rd Baron Southwell. The Southwell family descends from Thomas Southwell. In 1662 he was created a Baronet, of Castle Mattress in the County of Limerick, in the Baronetage of Ireland. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He represented Limerick County in the Irish Parliament. In 1717 he was created Baron Southwell, of Castle Mattress, in the County of Limerick, in the Peerage of Ireland. His grandson was the aforementioned third Baron, who was elevated to a viscountcy in 1776. Before succeeded in the barony he had represented Enniscorthy in the Irish House of Commons. His great-grandson, the fourth Viscount, served as Lord Lieutenant of County Leitrim between 1872 and 1878. As of 2019 the titles are held by his great-great-grandson, the eighth Viscount, who succeeded his father in that year.

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Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell

Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell PC (Ire), known as Sir Thomas Southwell, 2nd Baronet from 1681 to 1717, was an Irish peer and politician.

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