Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell

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Thomas, 1st Baron Southwell of Castle Mattress (Balthasar Denner) Thomas, 1st Baron Southwell of Castle Mattress, Attributed to Balthasar Denner.jpg
Thomas, 1st Baron Southwell of Castle Mattress (Balthasar Denner)

Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell PC (Ire) (1665 – 4 August 1720), [1] known as Sir Thomas Southwell, 2nd Baronet from 1681 to 1717, was an Irish peer and politician.

The Privy Council of Ireland was an institution of the Kingdom of Ireland until 31 December 1800 and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. It performed a similar role in the Dublin Castle administration in Ireland to that of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in the government of the United Kingdom.

Contents

Background

He was the oldest son of Richard Southwell, son of Sir Thomas Southwell, 1st Baronet, and his wife Lady Elizabeth O'Brien, daughter of Murrough O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin. [2] His younger brothers were William Southwell and Richard Southwell. [3] In 1681, his father having predeceased him, Southwell succeeded his grandfather as baronet. [4] During the Glorious Revolution of 1689, he and his brother were attainted by the parliament of King James II of England. [5] Southwell was also imprisoned, but was released and pardoned the following year. [5]

Richard Southwell was an Irish politician.

Sir Thomas Southwell, 1st Baronet was an Anglo-Irish politician.

Murrough OBrien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin Irish soldier

Murrough MacDermod O'Brien, 6th Baron Inchiquin, 1st Baron O'Brien of Burren, 1st Earl of Inchiquin, was known as Murchadh na dTóiteán – of Irish who would not convert to Anglicanism and their land, crops, livestock, and dwellings.

Career

In 1695, Southwell entered the Irish House of Commons for Limerick County, representing it until 1713. [6] He was returned for the constituency again from 1715 until August 1717, [6] when he was elevated to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Southwell, of Castle Mattress, in the County of Limerick. [7] In 1697, Southwell became a Commissioner of the Revenue, however resigned in 1712. [5] He was reappointed two years later and held this post until his death in 1720. [5] In May 1710, Southwell was sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [8]

Irish House of Commons lower house of the irish parliament (until 1800)

The Irish House of Commons was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise, similar to the Unreformed House of Commons in contemporary England and Great Britain. In counties, forty-shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self-electing corporations or a highly-restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Most notably, Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691, even though they comprised the vast majority of the Irish population. From 1728 until 1793 they were also disfranchised. Most of the population of all religions had no vote. The vast majority of parliamentary boroughs were pocket boroughs, the private property of an aristocratic patron. When these boroughs were disfranchised under the Act of Union, the patron was awarded £15,000 compensation for each.

Limerick County was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800.

The Peerage of Ireland consists of those titles of nobility created by the English monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland, or later by monarchs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The creation of such titles came to an end in the 19th century. The ranks of the Irish peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount and Baron. As of 2016, there were 135 titles in the Peerage of Ireland extant: two dukedoms, ten marquessates, 43 earldoms, 28 viscountcies, and 52 baronies. The Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland continues to exercise jurisdiction over the Peerage of Ireland, including those peers whose titles derive from places located in what is now the Republic of Ireland. Article 40.2 of the Irish Constitution forbids the state conferring titles of nobility and a citizen may not accept titles of nobility or honour except with the prior approval of the Government. As stated above, this issue does not arise in respect of the Peerage of Ireland, as no creations of titles in it have been made since the Constitution came into force.

Family

In April 1696, he married Lady Meliora Coningsby, eldest daughter of Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby. [4] They had six sons and five daughters. [4] Southwell died at Dublin and was buried at Rathkeale. [9] He was succeeded in his titles by his oldest son Thomas. [10] His second son Henry sat also in the Parliament of Ireland. [9]

Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby English politician

Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby PC of Hampton Court Castle, Herefordshire was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times from 1679 until 1716 when he was created a peer and sat in the House of Lords

Dublin capital and largest city in Ireland

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. It is on the east coast of Ireland, in the province of Leinster, at the mouth of the River Liffey, and is bordered on the south by the Wicklow mountains. It has an urban area population of 1,173,179, while the population of the Dublin Region, as of 2016, was 1,347,359, and the population of the Greater Dublin area was 1,904,806.

Rathkeale Town in Munster, Ireland

Rathkeale is a town in west County Limerick, in Ireland. It is 30 km (18 mi) southwest of Limerick city on the N21 road to Tralee, Co Kerry, and lies on the River Deel. Rathkeale has a significant Irish Traveller population, and the largest concentration of descendants of the German Palatines who immigrated to Ireland in the early 18th century is in villages around it.

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Viscount Southwell title in the peerage of Ireland

Viscount Southwell, of Castle Mattress in the County of Limerick, is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1776 for Thomas Southwell, 3rd Baron Southwell. The Southwell family descends from Thomas Southwell. In 1662 he was created a Baronet, of Castle Mattress in the County of Limerick, in the Baronetage of Ireland. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He represented Limerick County in the Irish Parliament. In 1717 he was created Baron Southwell, of Castle Mattress, in the County of Limerick, in the Peerage of Ireland. His grandson was the aforementioned third Baron, who was elevated to a viscountcy in 1776. Before succeeded in the barony he had represented Enniscorthy in the Irish House of Commons. His great-grandson, the fourth Viscount, served as Lord Lieutenant of County Leitrim between 1872 and 1878. As of 2010 the titles are held by his great-grandson, the seventh Viscount, who succeeded his uncle in 1960.

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References

  1. "Leigh Rayment – Peerage" . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  2. Burke, John (1863). Bernhard Burke, ed. Burke's Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland. vol. II. London: Harrison. p. 1738.
  3. "ThePeerage – Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell of Castle Mattress" . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  4. 1 2 3 Burke, John (1832). A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage of the British Empire. vol. II (4th ed.). London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 465.
  5. 1 2 3 4 Lodge, John (1789). Mervyn Archdall, ed. The Peerage of Ireland or A Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom. vol. VI. Dublin: James Moore. pp. 17–25.
  6. 1 2 "Leigh Rayment – Irish House of Commons 1692–1800" . Retrieved 10 June 2009.
  7. "No. 5565". The London Gazette . 17 August 1717. p. 1.
  8. "Leigh Rayment – Privy Council of Ireland".
  9. 1 2 "Southwell, Thomas (1667-1720)"  . Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. Pages 303–304.
  10. Lodge, Edmund (1838). The Genealogy of the Existing British Peerage (6th ed.). London: Saunder and Otley. p. 462.
Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
George Evans
Sir William King
Member of Parliament for Limerick County
1695–1713
With: Sir William King 1695–1703
Charles Oliver 1703–1707
George Evans 1707–1713
Succeeded by
George King
George Evans
Preceded by
George King
George Evans
Member of Parliament for Limerick County
1715–1717
With: Robert Oliver
Succeeded by
Hon. Thomas Southwell
Robert Oliver
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Baron Southwell
1717–1720
Succeeded by
Thomas Southwell
Baronetage of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Southwell
Baronet
(of Castle Mattress)
1681–1720
Succeeded by
Thomas Southwell