Thomas Southwell, 2nd Baron Southwell

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Thomas Southwell, 2nd Baron Southwell PC (Ire), FRS (7 January 1698 – 19 November 1766), [1] styled The Honourable from 1717 until 1720, was an Irish peer, politician and freemason.

The Privy Council of Ireland was an institution of the Kingdom of Ireland until 31 December 1800 and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. It performed a similar role in the Dublin Castle administration in Ireland to that of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in the government of the United Kingdom.

Royal Society English learned society for science

The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded on 28 November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society". It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world. The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement.

Contents

Background

He was the oldest son of Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell and his wife Lady Meliora Coningsby, eldest daughter of Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby. [2] His uncles were William Southwell and Richard Southwell, his younger brother was Henry Southwell. [3] In 1743, Southwell became Grandmaster of the Grand Lodge of Ireland, a position he held until the following year. [4]

Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell Irish politician

Thomas Southwell, 1st Baron Southwell PC (Ire), known as Sir Thomas Southwell, 2nd Baronet from 1681 to 1717, was an Irish peer and politician.

Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby English politician

Thomas Coningsby, 1st Earl Coningsby PC of Hampton Court Castle, Herefordshire was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times from 1679 until 1716 when he was created a peer and sat in the House of Lords

William Southwell was an Irish politician and British Army officer.

Career

In 1717, Southwell entered the Irish House of Commons for Limerick County, the same constituency his father had represented before, [1] and sat for it until 1720, when he succeeded him also as baron. [5] In 1726, Southwell was sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [6] He became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1735 [7] and was Governor of County Limerick until his resignation in 1762. [8]

Irish House of Commons lower house of the irish parliament (until 1800)

The Irish House of Commons was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise, similar to the Unreformed House of Commons in contemporary England and Great Britain. In counties, forty-shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self-electing corporations or a highly-restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Most notably, Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691, even though they comprised the vast majority of the Irish population. From 1728 until 1793 they were also disfranchised. Most of the population of all religions had no vote. The vast majority of parliamentary boroughs were pocket boroughs, the private property of an aristocratic patron. When these boroughs were disfranchised under the Act of Union, the patron was awarded £15,000 compensation for each.

Limerick County was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800.

Fellow of the Royal Society Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, including Honorary, Foreign and Royal Fellows

Fellowship of the Royal Society is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of London judges to have made a 'substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science and medical science'.

Family

In March 1719, he married Mary Coke, eldest daughter of Thomas Coke, and by her he had three sons. [8] Southwell died at Craig's Court, Charing Cross, aged 68 and was succeeded in his titles by his eldest surviving son Thomas. [8] His younger brother, Edmund Southwell, "lived in intimacy with" [9] Samuel Johnson for many years, and was the first to introduce the great Shakespearean scholar Edmond Malone to him. [9]

Charing Cross area of London, England

Charing Cross is a junction in London, England, where six routes meet. Clockwise from north these are: the east side of Trafalgar Square leading to St Martin's Place and then Charing Cross Road; the Strand; Northumberland Avenue; Whitehall; The Mall leading to Admiralty Arch and Buckingham Palace; and two short roads leading to Pall Mall.

Thomas George Southwell, 1st Viscount Southwell, styled The Honourable from birth until 1766, was an Irish politician and freemason.

Samuel Johnson English poet, biographer, essayist, and lexicographer

Samuel Johnson, often referred to as Dr. Johnson, was an English writer who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, playwright, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer. He was a devout Anglican and a generous philanthropist. Politically, he was a committed Tory. The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography describes Johnson as "arguably the most distinguished man of letters in English history". He is the subject of James Boswell's The Life of Samuel Johnson, described by Walter Jackson Bate as "the most famous single work of biographical art in the whole of literature".

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References

Notes

Sources

James Boswell 18th-century Scottish lawyer, diarist, and author

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International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Southwell, 2nd Bt
Robert Oliver
Member of Parliament for Limerick County
1717–1720
With: Robert Oliver
Succeeded by
Eyre Evans
Robert Oliver
Masonic offices
Preceded by
The Lord Moore of Tullamore
Grandmaster of the Grand Lodge of Ireland
1743–1744
Succeeded by
The Viscount Allen
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Southwell
Baron Southwell
1720–1766
Succeeded by
Thomas Southwell