Thomas Spur

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Thomas Spur ( 85°53′S161°40′W / 85.883°S 161.667°W / -85.883; -161.667 Coordinates: 85°53′S161°40′W / 85.883°S 161.667°W / -85.883; -161.667 ) is a prominent spur extending eastward from Rawson Plateau between Moffett and Tate Glaciers, in the Queen Maud Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Harry F. Thomas, meteorologist, South Pole Station winter party, 1960.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

The Rawson Plateau is an ice-covered plateau, 15 miles (24 km) long and 3,400 metres (11,150 ft) high, rising between the heads of Bowman Glacier, Moffett Glacier and Steagall Glacier in the Queen Maud Mountains. It was mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (ByrdAE), 1928–30, and by the U.S. Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and named for Kennett L. Rawson, a contributor to the ByrdAE, 1928–30, and a member of the ByrdAE, 1933–35.

Tate Glacier is a tributary glacier on the south side of Thomas Spur, flowing east and merging with Moffett Glacier just east of the spur where the two glaciers enter the larger Amundsen Glacier, in the Queen Maud Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Robert Tate, geomagnetist-seismologist with the South Pole Station winter party, 1964.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thomas Spur" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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