Thomas St George

Last updated
Thomas St George
Born1615
England, United Kingdom
Died1703 (aged 8788)
England, United Kingdom
Occupation Officer of arms
Parent(s) Henry St George
Relatives Henry St George, the younger (brother)

Sir Thomas St George (1615–1703) was an English officer of arms who rose to the rank of Garter Principal King of Arms (1686–1703).

Officer of arms state officer for heraldic, armorial or ceremonial duties

An officer of arms is a person appointed by a sovereign or state with authority to perform one or more of the following functions:

Garter Principal King of Arms

The Garter Principal King of Arms is the senior King of Arms, and the senior Officer of Arms of the College of Arms, the heraldic authority with jurisdiction over England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The position has existed since 1415.

Contents

Life

He was the eldest child of the herald Henry St George and his wife Mary Dayrell, daughter of Sir Thomas Dayrell. He lived at Woodford in Essex. [1] Around 1646 he married Clara Pymlowe (d. 1691), whose father John Pymlowe was a Northamptonshire rector. They had six children, including Thomas junior, who was Vicar of Bexley, and Eleanor, who married the eminent Irish judge Thomas Coote.

Sir Henry St George (1581–1644) was an English Officer of arms. He was the third son of the herald Sir Richard St George and his wife Elizabeth St John..

Essex County of England

Essex is a county in the south-east of England, north-east of London. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and London to the south-west. The county town is Chelmsford, the only city in the county. For government statistical purposes Essex is placed in the East of England region.

Northamptonshire County of England

Northamptonshire, archaically known as the County of Northampton, is a county in the East Midlands of England. In 2015 it had a population of 723,000. The county is administered by Northamptonshire County Council and by seven non-metropolitan district councils. It is known as "The Rose of the Shires".

At the Restoration he was appointed Somerset Herald. As deputy to Sir Edward Walker he went on a mission to Dresden and invested John George II, Elector of Saxony on 13 April 1669 with the Order of the Garter. He was knighted in 1669 and appointed Norroy King of Arms in 1680, in succession to his younger brother Henry. The seniority was reversed when in 1686, he was appointed Garter on the death of William Dugdale. In 1690 he appointed a deputy to deliver the Garter to a Continental recipient, but the following year he undertook the task himself as William III was to attend the ceremony. In 1693 Gregory King acted as his deputy to deliver the Garter to the Elector of Saxony. On his return to London in May 1693 he was knighted. [2]

Restoration (England) 1660 restoration of the English monarchy

The Restoration of the English monarchy took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II. This followed the Interregnum, also called the Protectorate, that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms.

Somerset Herald

Somerset Herald of Arms in Ordinary is an officer of arms at the College of Arms in London. In the year 1448 Somerset Herald is known to have served the Duke of Somerset, but by the time of the coronation of King Henry VII in 1485 his successor appears to have been raised to the rank of a royal officer, when he was the only herald to receive coronation liveries.

Edward Walker (officer of arms) English officer of arms

Sir Edward Walker was an officer of arms and antiquarian who served as Garter King of Arms.

Following his first wife's death, he married Anne (d. 1721), daughter of Sir John Lawson and widow of William Attwood in 1692. Their only daughter Isabella died in infancy. In 1693 he and his brother Sir Henry were appointed commissioners for the rebuilding of St Paul's Cathedral after the Great Fire of London. He died at the College of Arms on 6 March 1703 and was buried at Woodford. His manuscripts were purchased by Peter Le Neve, Norroy King of Arms. According to Noble, ‘he died more esteemed as a good, and more respected as an elegant man, than praised for his knowledge’. [3]

St Pauls Cathedral Church in London

St Paul's Cathedral, London, is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. It sits on Ludgate Hill at the highest point of the City of London and is a Grade I listed building. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. The present cathedral, dating from the late 17th century, was designed in the English Baroque style by Sir Christopher Wren. Its construction, completed in Wren's lifetime, was part of a major rebuilding programme in the City after the Great Fire of London. The cathedral building largely destroyed in the Great Fire, now often referred to as Old St Paul's Cathedral, was a central focus for medieval and early modern London, including Paul's walk and St. Paul's Churchyard being the site of St. Paul's Cross.

Great Fire of London disaster in 17th century England

The Great Fire of London was a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of the English city of London from Sunday, 2 September to Thursday, 6 September 1666. The fire gutted the medieval City of London inside the old Roman city wall. It threatened but did not reach the aristocratic district of Westminster, Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums. It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated to have destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the city's 80,000 inhabitants.

College of Arms British royal corporation consisting of professional officers of arms, with jurisdiction over England, Wales, Northern Ireland and some Commonwealth countries

The College of Arms, also known as the College of Heralds, is a royal corporation consisting of professional officers of arms, with jurisdiction over England, Wales, Northern Ireland and some Commonwealth realms. The heralds are appointed by the British Sovereign and are delegated authority to act on behalf of the Crown in all matters of heraldry, the granting of new coats of arms, genealogical research and the recording of pedigrees. The College is also the official body responsible for matters relating to the flying of flags on land, and it maintains the official registers of flags and other national symbols. Though a part of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom the College is self-financed, unsupported by any public funds.

His estates passed to his granddaughter Eleanor, who was the only child of his son Thomas and his wife Damaris Renter. She married Thomas Dare of Taunton.

Taunton town in Somerset, England

Taunton is a large regional town in Somerset, England. The town's population in 2011 was 69,570. Taunton has over 1,000 years of religious and military history, including a 10th century monastery and Taunton Castle, which has origins in the Anglo Saxon period and was later the site of a priory. The Normans then built a stone structured castle, which belonged to the Bishops of Winchester. The current heavily reconstructed buildings are the inner ward, which now houses the Museum of Somerset and the Somerset Military Museum.

Arms

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References

  1. D. Lysons, The Environs of London, vol. 4 (1796), 273-87
  2. Ashmole, Elias (1672): The Institution, Laws and Ceremonies of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. London: J. Macock, p. 426
  3. M. Noble, The History of the College of Arms (1804), 331-3
  4. Godfrey, Walter H; Wagner, Anthony (1963). "'Garter King of Arms', in Survey of London Monograph 16, College of Arms, Queen Victoria Street (London, 1963), pp. 38-74". british-history.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-11-01.