Thomas St George (Clogher MP)

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Thomas St George (October 1738 –1 April 1785) was an Irish politician. He sat in the House of Commons of Ireland from 1776 to 1785 as a Member of Parliament (MP) for the borough of Clogher in County Tyrone. [1]

Clogher was a borough constituency in the Irish House of Commons until 1800. It represented the "city" of Clogher in County Tyrone. The city, actually no more than a village, gained its importance as the site of the cathedral of the Church of Ireland diocese of Clogher. The constituency was a rotten borough in the gift of the bishop. When the constituency was disestablished, bishop John Porter's claim for £15,000 compensation was disallowed.

County Tyrone Place

County Tyrone is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland and one of the thirty-two counties on the island of Ireland. It is no longer used as an administrative division for local government but retains a strong identity in popular culture.

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References

  1. Leigh Rayment's historical List of Members of the Irish House of Commons cites: Johnston-Liik, Edith Mary (2002). The History of the Irish Parliament 1692-1800 (6 volumes). Ulster Historical Foundation.
Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
William Moore
John Staples
Member of Parliament for Clogher
1776–1785
With: Sir Capel Molyneux, 3rd Bt 1776–1783
Sackville Hamilton from 1783
Succeeded by
Sackville Hamilton
John Francis Cradock