Thomas St Lawrence, 1st Earl of Howth

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Thomas St Lawrence, 1st Earl of Howth (10 May 1730 - 29 September 1801) was Anglo-Irish peer and lawyer.

Howth was the son of William St Lawrence, 14th Baron Howth and Lucy Gorges, daughter of General Richard Gorges and his wife Nichola Sophia Hamilton. [1] He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin.

William St Lawrence, 14th Baron Howth (1688-1748) was an Irish peer and politician, who enjoyed the friendship of Jonathan Swift.

On 4 April 1748, he succeeded to his father's barony. In 1776, the Crown granted Howth a yearly pension of £500 in consideration of his own and his ancestors' services. He was a trained barrister, and was elected as a Bencher of King's Inns in Dublin in 1767. On 3 September that same year he was created Earl of Howth and Viscount St Lawrence, both in the Peerage of Ireland. [2] He was made a member of the Privy Council of Ireland in 1768. [3]

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He married Isabella King, daughter of Sir Henry King, 3rd Baronet and Isabella Wingfield, daughter of Edward Wingfield and sister of Richard,1st Viscount Powerscourt on 17 November 1750. Together they had six children. His eldest son predeceased him, and he was succeeded by his second son, William. [4]

Richard Wingfield, 1st Viscount Powerscourt PC (I) was an Anglo-Irish politician and peer.

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References

  1. John Lodge, The Peerage of Ireland (James Moore, 1789), 205.
  2. Edmund Lodge, The Peerage of the British Empire as at Present Existing (Saunders and Otley, 1832), 223.
  3. Cracroft's Peerage: The Complete Guide to the British Peerage & Baronetage - 'Howth, Earl of (I, 1767 - 1909)' http://www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk/online/content/howth1767.htm
  4. John Lodge, The Peerage of Ireland (James Moore, 1789), 205.
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
New creation
Earl of Howth
1767–1801
Succeeded by
William St Lawrence
Preceded by
New creation
Viscount St Lawrence
1767–1801
Succeeded by
William St Lawrence
Preceded by
William St Lawrence
Baron Howth
1748–1801
Succeeded by
William St Lawrence