Thomas Standish

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Thomas Standish (c. 1593 October 1642) of Duxbury Hall, Lancashire was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1640 and 1642. Standish was a zealous Parliamentarian.

Duxbury Hall

Duxbury Hall was a 19th-century country house in Duxbury Park estate in Duxbury Woods, Lancashire that has been demolished.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Roundhead Name given to the supporters of the Parliament during the English Civil War

Roundheads were the supporters of the Parliament of England during the English Civil War (1641–1652). Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against King Charles I of England and his supporters, known as the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the principle of the 'divine right of kings'. The goal of the Roundhead party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration of the country/kingdom.

Duxbury Hall, Lancashire, in 1840 Dux hhal.jpg
Duxbury Hall, Lancashire, in 1840

Standish was the son of Alexander Standish of Duxbury, educated at Queens' College, Cambridge and trained in law at Gray's Inn. He inherited the family manors of Duxbury and Duxbury Hall in 1622, on the death of his father. [1]

Queens College, Cambridge college of the University of Cambridge

Queens' College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. Queens' is one of the oldest and the largest colleges of the university, founded in 1448 by Margaret of Anjou, and has some of the most recognisable buildings in Cambridge. The college spans the river Cam, colloquially referred to as the "light side" and the "dark side", with the Mathematical Bridge connecting the two.

Grays Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of Gray's Inn, commonly known as Gray's Inn, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, a person must belong to one of these Inns. Located at the intersection of High Holborn and Gray's Inn Road in Central London, the Inn is both a professional body and a provider of office accommodation (chambers) for many barristers. It is ruled by a governing council called "Pension", made up of the Masters of the Bench, and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Inn is known for its gardens, or Walks, which have existed since at least 1597.

He served as Prothonotary clerk of Common Bench for the Duchy of Lancaster from 1608 to 1635. During that time he was elected MP for Liverpool in 1626.

Liverpool was a borough constituency in the county of Lancashire of the House of Commons for the Parliament of England to 1706 then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It was represented by two Members of Parliament (MPs). In 1868, this was increased to three Members of Parliament.

In April 1640, he was elected Member of Parliament for Preston in the Short Parliament. He was re-elected in November 1640 and sat in the Long Parliament until his death in 1642. [2]

Preston (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1983 onwards

Preston is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2000 by Sir Mark Hendrick, a member of the Labour Party and Co-operative Party.

Short Parliament Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England

The Short Parliament was a Parliament of England that was summoned by King Charles I of England on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640. It was so called because of its short life of only three weeks.

Long Parliament English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660

The Long Parliament was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640, King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640. He intended it to pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars in Scotland. The Long Parliament received its name from the fact that, by Act of Parliament, it stipulated it could be dissolved only with agreement of the members; and, those members did not agree to its dissolution until 16 March 1660, after the English Civil War and near the close of the Interregnum.

Standish died at the age of 49 and was buried at Chorley chapel. He had married twice; firstly Anne Wingfield, daughter of Sir Thomas Wingfield of Letheringham, Suffolk, with whom he had three sons and two daughters and secondly Anne, the daughter of Christopher Whittingham, of London and Suffolk, with whom he had a further three sons and three daughters. His eldest son, Thomas supported the king's side in the Civil War and was killed in September 1642 while taking part in the attack on Manchester. Standish was succeeded in turn by younger sons Alexander, a Roundhead colonel who died in 1648 and Richard, MP for Lancashire and Preston, whose son and heir Richard was created a baronet in 1677. [1]

Chorley town in Lancashire, England

Chorley is a town in Lancashire, England, 8.1 miles (13 km) north of Wigan, 10.8 miles (17 km) south west of Blackburn, 11 miles (18 km) north west of Bolton, 12 miles (19 km) south of Preston and 19.5 miles (31 km) north west of Manchester. The town's wealth came principally from the cotton industry.

Richard Standish was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1659 and 1660. He was a colonel in the Parliamentarian army in the English Civil War.

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References

  1. 1 2 Townships: Duxbury, A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6 (1911), pp. 208-213. Date accessed: 6 January 2011
  2. Willis, Browne (1750). Notitia Parliamentaria, Part II: A Series or Lists of the Representatives in the several Parliaments held from the Reformation 1541, to the Restoration 1660 ... London. pp.  onepage&q&f&#61, false 229–239.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Parliament suspended since 1629
Member of Parliament for Preston
1640–1642
With: Richard Shuttleworth
Succeeded by
Richard Shuttleworth
William Langton