Thomas Stanford (film editor)

Last updated
Thomas Stanford
Born
Thomas Gerard Stanford

1924
Germany
Died (aged 93)
Occupation Film editor
Years active1955-1988

Thomas Gerald Stanford (1924 December 23, 2017) was an American film editor. He won an Academy Award at the 34th Academy Awards for Best Film Editing for the film West Side Story . [1] He also edited 2 episodes of Burke's Law and an episode of Route 66 . He died at the age of 93 in 2017. [2] [3]

The 34th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1961, were held on April 9, 1962, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope; this was the 13th time Hope hosted the Oscars.

Academy Award for Best Film Editing one of the annual awards of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The Academy Award for Best Film Editing is one of the annual awards of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). Nominations for this award are closely correlated with the Academy Award for Best Picture. For 33 consecutive years, 1981 to 2013, every Best Picture winner had also been nominated for the Film Editing Oscar, and about two thirds of the Best Picture winners have also won for Film Editing. Only the principal, "above the line" editor(s) as listed in the film's credits are named on the award; additional editors, supervising editors, etc. are not currently eligible. The nominations for this Academy Award are determined by a ballot of the voting members of the Editing Branch of the Academy; there were 220 members of the Editing Branch in 2012. The members may vote for up to five of the eligible films in the order of their preference; the five films with the largest vote totals are selected as nominees. The Academy Award itself is selected from the nominated films by a subsequent ballot of all active and life members of the Academy. This process is essentially the reverse of that of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA); nominations for the BAFTA Award for Best Editing are done by a general ballot of Academy voters, and the winner is selected by members of the editing chapter.

<i>West Side Story</i> (1961 film) 1961 film by Robert Wise, Jerome Robbins

West Side Story is a 1961 American romantic musical drama film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. The film is an adaptation of the 1957 Broadway musical of the same name, which in turn was inspired by William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. It stars Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn, Rita Moreno, and George Chakiris, and was photographed by Daniel L. Fapp in Super Panavision 70. Released on October 18, 1961, through United Artists, the film received high praise from critics and viewers, and became the second highest grossing film of the year in the United States. The film was nominated for 11 Academy Awards and won ten, including Best Picture, becoming the record holder for the most wins for a musical.

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References

  1. "The 33rd Academy Awards (1961) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org. Retrieved March 21, 2014.
  2. "Thomas Stanford, Oscar-Winning Film Editor on 'West Side Story,' Dies at 93". Hollywoodreporter.com. Retrieved 31 December 2017.
  3. "Thomas G. Stanford's Obituary on Santa Fe New Mexican". Legacy.com. Retrieved 31 December 2017.