Thomas Stanley (1749–1816)

Last updated

Thomas Stanley (14 September 1749 – 25 December 1816) [1] was a British Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons for 32 years from 1780 to 1812. [2] politician.

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

He was the son of the Revd Thomas Stanley and educated at Manchester Grammar School and Trinity Hall, Cambridge. He was described as being of Cross Hill, Lancashire.

Manchester Grammar School independent day school for boys in the United Kingdom

Manchester Grammar School (MGS) in Manchester, England, is the largest independent day school for boys in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1515 as a free grammar school next to Manchester Parish Church, in 1931 it moved to its present site at Fallowfield. In accordance with its founder's wishes, MGS has remained a predominantly academic school and belongs to the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference.

Trinity Hall, Cambridge College of the University of Cambridge

Trinity Hall is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. It is the fifth-oldest college of the university, having been founded in 1350 by William Bateman, Bishop of Norwich.

He was a Member of Parliament (MP) for Lancashire from February 1780 until he retired from the House of Commons at the 1812 general election, [1] having been elected unopposed at seven successive elections. [2] In his long parliamentary career he spoke often in favour of the Lancashire cotton industry.

Lancashire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England from 1290, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800, and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament, traditionally known as Knights of the Shire until 1832.

1780 British general election

The 1780 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 15th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was held during the American War of Independence and returned Lord North to form a new government with a small and rocky majority. The opposition consisted largely of the Rockingham Whigs, the Whig faction led by the Marquess of Rockingham. North's opponents referred to his supporters as Tories, but no Tory party existed at the time and his supporters rejected the label.

House of Commons of the United Kingdom Lower house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Commons, officially the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled, is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Owing to shortage of space, its office accommodation extends into Portcullis House.

He died unmarried aged 67. [1]

Related Research Articles

Thomas Stanley is the name of:

King's Lynn was a constituency in Norfolk represented continually in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1298 until it was abolished for the February 1974 general election.

Thomas Egerton, 1st Earl of Wilton British Earl

Thomas Grey Egerton, 1st Earl of Wilton, known as Sir Thomas Grey Egerton, Bt from 1766 to 1784, was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1772 to 1784 when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Grey de Wilton.

Bristol was a two-member constituency, used to elect members to the House of Commons in the Parliaments of England, Great Britain (1707–1800) and the United Kingdom. The constituency existed until Bristol was divided into single member constituencies in 1885.

North Lancashire was a county constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was represented by two Members of Parliament. The constituency was created by the Great Reform Act of 1832 by the splitting of Lancashire constituency into Northern and Southern divisions.

Radnor or New Radnor was a constituency in Wales between 1542 and 1885; it elected one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliaments of England (1542–1707), Great Britain (1707–1800) and the United Kingdom (1801–1885), by the first past the post electoral system. In the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885, the division was merged into Radnorshire.

Stanley Burgess was a British trade unionist and Labour Party politician, sitting as MP for Rochdale 1922-23.

Sir Thomas Miller, 5th Baronet, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in two periods between 1774 and 1816.

Edward Stanley (Bridgwater MP) British Conservative politician, died 1907

Edward James Stanley DL JP, was a British Conservative politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1882 to 1906.

Jocelyn Deane JP was an Irish politician.

Thomas Fielden (politician) British politician

Thomas Fielden was a British Conservative Party politician.

Colonel Henry Bruen was an Irish Tory Party politician. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Carlow County for a total of about 36 years, in three separate periods between 1812 and 1852, taking his seat in the House of Commons of what was then the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

Sir Abraham Hume, 2nd Baronet British floriculturist and Tory politician

Sir Abraham Hume, 2nd Baronet was a British floriculturist and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1774 and 1818.

William Gray was an English Conservative Party politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1857 to 1874.

John Ivatt Briscoe was an English Whig and later Liberal politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1857 to 1870.

Thomas Hinton Burley Oldfield (1755–1822) was an English political reformer, parliamentary historian and antiquary. His major work, The Representative History, has been called "a domesday book of corruption".

John Courtenay was an Irish officer in the British Army who became a politician in England. He was a Member of Parliament (MP) at Westminster from 1780 to 1807, and again in 1812.

John Fownes Luttrell was an English Tory politician from Dunster Castle in Somerset. Like many previous generations of Luttrells since the 16th century, he was a Member of Parliament (MP) for Minehead, his family's pocket borough near Dunster. He sat in the House of Commons of Great Britain and then in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1774 until his death in 1816, except for a few months in 1806–07.

Thomas Philip Maunsell was a British Conservative politician.

William Bird Brodie was a British Whig politician.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "L" (part 1)
  2. 1 2 Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. p. 1812. ISBN   0-900178-13-2.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Thomas Stanley
Thomas Egerton
Member of Parliament for Lancashire
17801800
With: Thomas Egerton to 1784
John Blackburne from 1784
Succeeded by
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Member of Parliament for Lancashire
18011812
With: John Blackburne
Succeeded by
Lord Stanley
John Blackburne