Thomas Stanley Horry

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Wing Commander

Thomas Stanley Horry

DFC; AFC
Born21 May 1898
Boston, Lincolnshire, England
DiedUnknown
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Air Force
RankWing Commander
Unit No. 92 Squadron RAF
Awards Distinguished Flying Cross Air Force Cross, General Service Cross

Squadron Leader Thomas Stanley Horry DFC AFC (born 21 May 1898, date of death unknown) was a First World War flying ace credited with eight aerial victories. [1]

He was the son of W. T. Horry of Rout Green, Boston, Lincolnshire. [2] For his schooling he attended Framlingham College and entered service with the Royal Flying Corp in 1916. [3] Serving in France during the First World War, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross while with 92 Squadron in 1918. [3]

After the war he continued his service with the Royal Air Force in Iraq with No. 70 (Bomber) Squadron and he was awarded an Air Force Cross. From there he was sent to Kurdistan and the Southern Desert and gained the General Service Medal with two clasps. [3]

He was appointed to No. 22 Squadron based at RAF Martlesham Heath. [4]

As the then Lieutenant Horry, he became engaged in 1936 to Lola Tremlett. [2]

He was promoted to Squadron Leader in 1937 [5] and in 1938 was sent to serve at RAF Seletar in Singapore. [3]

In 1940 he rose to the rank of Wing Commander. [6]

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References

  1. http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/england/horry.php
  2. 1 2 "Marriages". The Times (47288). 3 February 1936. p. 15.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Royal Air Force". The Times (48050). 19 July 1938. p. 25.
  4. "R.A.F. Appointments". The Times (45336). 17 October 1929. p. 22.
  5. "R.A.F. Promotions". The Times (47648). 2 April 1937. p. 7.
  6. "Royal Air Force Promotions". The Times (48563). 13 March 1940. p. 6.