Thomas Stickney

Last updated
Col.

Thomas Stickney
Born(1729-06-15)June 15, 1729
DiedJanuary 26, 1809(1809-01-26) (aged 79)
Burial place Concord, New Hampshire, USA [1]
NationalityUnited States
OccupationMilitary Officer

Thomas Stickney [2] [3] (June 15, 1729 January 26, 1809) was an American military officer and statesman born in Bedford, Massachusetts.

Bedford, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Bedford is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. It is within the Greater Boston area, 15 miles (24 km) north-west of the city of Boston. The population of Bedford was 13,320 at the 2010 census.

He moved to Concord, New Hampshire, as a young man with his father Jeremiah and brother William. Their house was made into a "garrison house" where others could come for protection from Indian raids.

Concord, New Hampshire capital of New Hampshire

Concord is the capital city of the U.S. state of New Hampshire and the county seat of Merrimack County. As of the 2010 census, its population was 42,695.

Blockhouse small, isolated fort in the form of a single building

In military science, a blockhouse is a small fortification, usually consisting of one or more rooms with loopholes, allowing its defenders to fire in various directions. It usually refers to an isolated fort in the form of a single building, serving as a defensive strong point against any enemy that does not possess siege equipment or, in modern times, artillery, air force and cruise missiles. A fortification intended to resist these weapons is more likely to qualify as a fortress or a redoubt, or in modern times, be an underground bunker. However, a blockhouse may also refer to a room within a larger fortification, usually a battery or redoubt.

History of Native Americans in the United States

The history of Native Americans in the United States began in ancient times tens of thousands of years ago with the settlement of the Americas by the Paleo-Indians. Anthropologists and archeologists have identified and studied a wide variety of cultures that existed during this era. Their subsequent contact with Europeans had a profound impact on their history of the people.

During King George's War, Stickney served under John Goffe in a company of scouts (rangers).

King Georges War conflict

King George's War (1744–1748) is the name given to the military operations in North America that formed part of the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–1748). It was the third of the four French and Indian Wars. It took place primarily in the British provinces of New York, Massachusetts Bay, New Hampshire, and Nova Scotia. Its most significant action was an expedition organized by Massachusetts Governor William Shirley that besieged and ultimately captured the French fortress of Louisbourg, on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, in 1745. In French, it is known as the Troisième Guerre Intercoloniale or Third Intercolonial War.

John Goffe was a Colonial American soldier. His name is preserved in the name of Goffstown, New Hampshire and the Goffe's Falls neighborhood of Manchester, New Hampshire.

Stickney married Anna Osgood, also of Concord; they had eight children.

On January 20, 1774, Thomas was promoted to Lt. Col. in the New Hampshire Militia and often was moderator of the Concord town meetings. With the start of the American Revolutionary War, Col. Stickney was appointed to the New Hampshire Committee of Safety. In the spring of 1777, Col. Stickney was with his regiment, the 11th New Hampshire Militia Regiment, at Fort Ticonderoga to reinforce the Continental Army garrison there. "Soon after they arrived back in New Hampshire, the regiment was called up to serve in Gen. John Stark's brigade during the Saratoga Campaign. Col. Stickney led his men at the Battle of Bennington, where 2 detachments of British Gen. John Burgoyne's army were defeated. In 1778, Col. Stickney raised men for Gen. John Sullivan for the unsuccessful Battle of Rhode Island.

The New Hampshire Militia was first organized in March 1680, by New Hampshire Colonial President John Cutt. The King of England authorized the Provincial President to give commissions to persons who shall be best qualified for regulating and discipline of the militia. President Cutt placed Major Richard Waldron of Dover in command of the Militia. In 1879, the Militia was designated by the state as the New Hampshire National Guard.

American Revolutionary War War between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, which won independence as the United States of America

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America.

Stickney's Regiment of Militia, also known as the 11th New Hampshire Militia Regiment, was at Fort Ticonderoga during the spring of 1777 reinforcing the Continental Army garrison. The regiment was again called up on July 21, 1777, at Pembroke, New Hampshire for Gen. John Stark's Brigade gathering at Charlestown, New Hampshire during the Saratoga campaign. Part of Stickney's Regiment under Lt. Col. Nataniel Emerson was sent to Otter Creek on August 4 to clear out any remaining Loyalists. On August 16, 1777, Stickney's regiment, along with Hale's and Hobart's Regiment, made the main attack on Friedrich Baum's redoubt during the Battle of Bennington as Nichols' attacked from the rear (west) and Simonds' attacked from the south. Lt. Col. Emerson's detachment arrived along with Seth Warner's Green Mountain Boys in time to rout Heinrich von Breymann's reinforcements. Stickney's Regiment would continue on in Stark's Brigade to cut off British Gen. John Burgoyne from retreat or supply after the Battle of Freeman's Farm. The regiment would be disbanded on October 26, 1777, in northern New York.

Thomas Stickney was the moderator at the New Hampshire constitutional convention on October 31, 1783, which ratified the New Hampshire Constitution. He died on January 26, 1809, at his beloved home in Concord.

Constitutional convention (political meeting) gathering for the purpose of writing or revising a constitution

A constitutional convention is a gathering for the purpose of writing a new constitution or revising an existing constitution. Members of a constitutional convention are often, though not necessarily or entirely, elected by popular vote. However, a wholly popularly-elected constitutional convention can also be referred to as a constituent assembly.

Related Research Articles

John Stark American Revolutionary War general from New Hampshire

John Stark was a New Hampshire native who served as an officer in the British Army during the French and Indian war and a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He became widely known as the "Hero of Bennington" for his exemplary service at the Battle of Bennington in 1777.

Nathaniel Folsom was an American merchant and statesman.

Buffs (Royal East Kent Regiment)

The Buffs , formerly the 3rd Regiment of Foot, was a line infantry regiment of the British Army traditionally raised in the English county of Kent and garrisoned at Canterbury. It had a history dating back to 1572 and was one of the oldest regiments in the British Army, being third in order of precedence. The regiment provided distinguished service over a period of almost four hundred years accumulating one hundred and sixteen battle honours. In 1881, under the Childers Reforms, it was known as the Buffs and later, on 3 June 1935, was renamed the Buffs .

The 28th Regiment of Foot was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, raised in 1694. Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 61st Regiment of Foot to form the Gloucestershire Regiment in 1881.

8th Connecticut Regiment

In October 1774, Jedediah Huntington of Norwich was made Colonel of the 20th Regiment of Connecticut Militia. When news of the Battles of Lexington and Concord arrived in Norwich on April 20, 1775 Colonel Huntington immediately got his men ready to march. On April 26 they arrived in Wrentham, Massachusetts, and a few days later they were in Roxbury and became part of the Siege of Boston. Because of a lack of overall command, as well as a lack of supplies, many of the militia units returned home.

Joseph Cilley was a New Hampshire state senator and general.

George Reid (1733–1815) was born in Londonderry, Province of New Hampshire and was a farmer by trade. He married Mary Woodburn in 1765 who was noted for her skill in running their farm in George's long service during the American Revolutionary War. With news of the Battle of Lexington and Concord, George Reid marched with his militia company to Boston, Massachusetts and commanded a company of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment at the Battle of Bunker Hill. George Reid was with the 1st NH during the Invasion of Canada, the Battle of Trenton and the Battle of Princeton. In the Spring of 1777 George Reid was appointed Lt. Col. of the 2nd New Hampshire Regiment. With the capture of Col. Nathan Hale at the Battle of Hubbardton by the British Army, George Reid took command of the 2nd NH and led them during the rest of the Saratoga Campaign, the Battle of Monmouth and the Sullivan Expedition of 1779. With the consolidation of the three New Hampshire regiments in 1783, Col. Reid was appointed commander of the combined unit until its disbandment on January 1, 1784.

Hobart's Regiment of Militia also known as the 12th New Hampshire Militia Regiment was called up on July 21, 1777 at Plymouth, New Hampshire for Gen. John Stark's Brigade gathering at Charlestown, New Hampshire during the Saratoga Campaign. Hobart's Regiment along with Hale's and Stickney's Regiment would assault Friedrich Baum's redoubt from the front (east) during the Battle of Bennington as Nichols' attacked from the rear (west) and Simonds' attacked from the south. Hobart's Regiment would continue on in Stark's Brigade to cut off British Gen. John Burgoyne from retreat or supply after the Battle of Freeman's Farm. The regiment would be disbanded on October 26, 1777 in northern New York.

Nichols' Regiment of Militia also known as the 5th New Hampshire Militia Regiment was called up on July 21, 1777 at Winchester, New Hampshire, for Gen. John Stark's Brigade gathering at Charlestown, New Hampshire during the Saratoga Campaign. It was named for Dr Moses Nichols, who was appointed colonel of the regiment in 1776.

Moore's Regiment of Militia also known as the 9th New Hampshire Militia Regiment was called up at Lyndeborough, New Hampshire on September 29, 1777 as reinforcements for the Continental Army during the Saratoga Campaign. The regiment marched quickly to join the gathering forces of Gen. Horatio Gates as he faced British Gen. John Burgoyne in northern New York. The regiment served in Gen. William Whipple's brigade of New Hampshire militia. With the surrendered of Burgoyne's Army on October 17 the regiment was disbanded on October 27, 1777. Gen. John Stark gave to the regiment a Brass 4 pounder cannon captured at the Battle of Bennington.

Jonathan Chase was a soldier in the American Revolutionary War.

The New Hampshire Provincial Regiment was a provincial military regiment made up of men from the New Hampshire Militia during the French and Indian War for service with the British Army in North America. It was first formed in 1754 with the start of hostilities with France.

Hale's Regiment of Militia also known as the 15th New Hampshire Militia Regiment was at Fort Ticonderoga during the spring and summer of 1776 reinforcing the Continental Army garrison. The regiment was again called up on July 21, 1777 at Rindge, New Hampshire for Gen. John Stark's Brigade gathering at Charlestown, New Hampshire during the Saratoga Campaign. On August 16, 1777 Hale's regiment along with Hobart's Regiment and Stickney's Regiment made the main attack on Friedrich Baum's redoubt during the Battle of Bennington as Nichols' attacked from the rear (west) and Simonds' attacked from the south. Hale's Regiment would continue on in Stark's Brigade to cut off British Gen. John Burgoyne from retreat or supply after the Battle of Freeman's Farm. The regiment was also part of Gen. John Sullivan's army at the unsuccessful Battle of Rhode Island in 1778.

Moses Nichols was an American physician, soldier, and leading citizen of Amherst, New Hampshire.

The 37th Regiment of Foot was a line infantry regiment of the British Army, raised in Ireland in February 1702. Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 67th Regiment of Foot to become the Hampshire Regiment in 1881.

40th (the 2nd Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot infantry regiment of the British Army

The 40th Regiment of Foot was an infantry regiment of the British Army, raised in 1717 in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia. Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 82nd Regiment of Foot to form the Prince of Wales's Volunteers in 1881.

The 58th (Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot was a British Army line infantry regiment, raised in 1755. Under the Childers Reforms it amalgamated with the 48th (Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot to form the Northamptonshire Regiment in 1881.

Jesse Gove lawyer and colonel in the United States Army during the American Civil War

Jesse Augustus Gove was an American soldier and lawyer, noteworthy for his military career and his role as a colonel in the American Civil War. After graduating from the American Literary Scientific and Military Academy at Norwich, Vermont, Gove served in the Mexican–American War. After the war, he left the army and became a lawyer in New Hampshire, then returned to army service in 1855. During the Civil War he was colonel of the 22nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry and was killed leading that regiment in the Battle of Gaines' Mill.

References

  1. 1 2 "Colonel Thomas Stickney". geni_family_tree. 11 December 2017. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  2. Bouton, Nathaniel (1856). The History of Concord: From Its First Grant in 1725, to the Organization of the City Government in 1853, with a History of the Ancient Penacooks ; the Whole Interspersed with Numerous Interesting Incidents and Anecdotes, Down to the Present Period, 1885 ; Embellished with Maps ; with Portraits of Distinguished Citizens, and Views of Ancient and Modern Residences. Benning W. Sanborn. p. 786.
  3. Willey, George Franklyn (1903). Willey, George (ed.). State Builders: An Illustrated Historical and Biographical Record of the State of New Hampshire at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. The New Hampshire Publishing Corporation. p. 503.