Thomas Stickney

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Col.

Thomas Stickney
Born(1729-06-15)June 15, 1729
DiedJanuary 26, 1809(1809-01-26) (aged 79)
Burial place Concord, New Hampshire, USA [1]
NationalityAmerican
OccupationMilitary Officer

Thomas Stickney [2] [3] (June 15, 1729 January 26, 1809) was an American military officer and statesman born in Bedford, Massachusetts.

He moved to Concord, New Hampshire, as a young man with his father Jeremiah and brother William. Their house was made into a "garrison house" where others could come for protection from Indian raids.

During King George's War, Stickney served under John Goffe in a company of scouts (rangers).

Stickney married Anna Osgood, also of Concord; they had eight children.

On January 20, 1774, Thomas was promoted to Lt. Col. in the New Hampshire Militia and often was moderator of the Concord town meetings. With the start of the American Revolutionary War, Col. Stickney was appointed to the New Hampshire Committee of Safety. In the spring of 1777, Col. Stickney was with his regiment, the 11th New Hampshire Militia Regiment, at Fort Ticonderoga to reinforce the Continental Army garrison there. "Soon after they arrived back in New Hampshire, the regiment was called up to serve in Gen. John Stark's brigade during the Saratoga Campaign. Col. Stickney led his men at the Battle of Bennington, where 2 detachments of British Gen. John Burgoyne's army were defeated. In 1778, Col. Stickney raised men for Gen. John Sullivan for the unsuccessful Battle of Rhode Island.

Thomas Stickney was the moderator at the New Hampshire constitutional convention on October 31, 1783, which ratified the New Hampshire Constitution. He died on January 26, 1809, at his beloved home in Concord.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Colonel Thomas Stickney". geni_family_tree. 11 December 2017. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  2. Bouton, Nathaniel (1856). The History of Concord: From Its First Grant in 1725, to the Organization of the City Government in 1853, with a History of the Ancient Penacooks ; the Whole Interspersed with Numerous Interesting Incidents and Anecdotes, Down to the Present Period, 1885 ; Embellished with Maps ; with Portraits of Distinguished Citizens, and Views of Ancient and Modern Residences. Benning W. Sanborn. pp.  786. Thomas Stickney.
  3. Willey, George Franklyn (1903). Willey, George (ed.). State Builders: An Illustrated Historical and Biographical Record of the State of New Hampshire at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century. The New Hampshire Publishing Corporation. pp.  503.