Thomas Stinson

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Thomas Stinson (15 July 1798 13 March 1864) was a Hamilton, Ontario merchant, banker, and landowner.

Hamilton, Ontario City in Ontario, Canada

Hamilton is a port city in the Canadian province of Ontario. An industrialized city in the Golden Horseshoe at the west end of Lake Ontario, Hamilton has a population of 536,917, and a metropolitan population of 747,545. The city is located about 60 km southwest of Toronto, with which the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) is formed.

Merchant businessperson who trades in commodities that were produced by others

A merchant is a person who trades in commodities produced by other people. Historically, a merchant is anyone who is involved in business or trade. Merchants have been known for as long as industry, commerce, and trade have existed. During the 16th-century, in Europe, two different terms for merchants emerged: One term, meerseniers, described local traders such as bakers, grocers, etc.; while a new term, koopman, described merchants who operated on a global stage, importing and exporting goods over vast distances, and offering added value services such as credit and finance.

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Early life and marriage

Stinson was born in 1798 near Drum, County Monaghan, Ireland.

Drum, County Monaghan Town in Ulster, Ireland

Drum is a village in south County Monaghan, Ireland. It is notable for being the only Protestant-majority settlement in the Republic of Ireland.

County Monaghan County in the Republic of Ireland

County Monaghan is a county in Ireland. It is part of the Border Region and is in the province of Ulster. It is named after the town of Monaghan. Monaghan County Council is the local authority for the county. The population of the county is 60,483 according to the 2011 census.

Ireland Island in north-west Europe, 20th largest in world, politically divided into the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (a part of the UK)

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

In 1822 Stinson migrated to North America. Briefly staying in Lockport, New York, he moved to Upper Canada in 1826, settling in Clinton Township in the Niagara Peninsula. There he married Margaret Zimmerman, daughter of a Loyalist from the Beamsville, Ontario area.

North America Continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere

North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas. It is bordered to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America and the Caribbean Sea.

Lockport (city), New York City in New York, United States

Lockport is a city and the county seat of Niagara County, New York, surrounded by the town of Lockport. The population was 21,165 at the 2010 census, with an estimated population of 20,480 as of 2016. It is named from a set of Erie Canal locks within the city. It is part of the Buffalo–Niagara Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Upper Canada 19th century British colony in present-day Ontario

The Province of Upper Canada was a part of British Canada established in 1791 by the Kingdom of Great Britain, to govern the central third of the lands in British North America, formerly part of the Province of Quebec since 1763. Upper Canada included all of modern-day Southern Ontario and all those areas of Northern Ontario in the Pays d'en Haut which had formed part of New France, essentially the watersheds of the Ottawa River or Lakes Huron and Superior, excluding any lands within the watershed of Hudson Bay. The "upper" prefix in the name reflects its geographic position along the Great Lakes, mostly above the headwaters of the Saint Lawrence River, contrasted with Lower Canada to the northeast.

Business career

The Stinsons moved to Hamilton in 1830 and established a dry goods, grocery, hardware and crockery business on King Street East in the "Stinson Block", the first brick business block in Hamilton. In 1831 he established a branch store in Dundas, Ontario.

King Street (Hamilton, Ontario) road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

King Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, also known as Highway 8. The western-end starts off in front of the McMaster University Medical Centre as a two-way street and passes through Westdale. At Paradise Road, King Street switches over to a one-way street (westbound) right through the city's core up to "the Delta", a spot in town where King and Main streets intersect. From the Delta onwards, King Street then switches over to become a two-way street again and ends at Highway 8 in Stoney Creek.

Dundas, Ontario Dissolved municipality in Ontario, Canada

Dundas is a community and former town in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It is nicknamed the Valley Town because of its topographical location at the bottom of the Niagara Escarpment on the Western edge of Lake Ontario. The population has been stable for decades at about twenty thousand, largely because it has not annexed rural land from the protected Dundas Valley Conservation Area.

He was an extensive landowner in not only in Hamilton, Ontario but as well as Chicago, St. Paul, Minnesota, and Superior City, Wisconsin, which he named. [1]

Chicago City in Illinois, United States

Chicago, officially the City of Chicago, is the most populous city in Illinois and the third most populous city in the United States. With an estimated population of 2,716,450 (2017), it is the most populous city in the Midwestern United States. Chicago is the county seat of Cook County, the second most populous county in the United States, and the principal city of the Chicago metropolitan area, which is often referred to as "Chicagoland." The Chicago metropolitan area, at nearly 10 million people, is the third-largest in the United States, the fourth largest in North America, and the third largest metropolitan area in the world by land area.

Superior, Wisconsin City in Wisconsin, United States

Superior is a city in, and the county seat of, Douglas County in the state of Wisconsin. The population was 27,244 at the 2010 census. Located at the junction of U.S. Highway 2 and U.S. Highway 53, it is immediately north of and adjacent to both the Village of Superior and the Town of Superior. Its neighborhoods include Billings Park, North End, South Superior, Central Park, East End, Allouez, and Itasca. Billings Park, South Superior, East End, and North End each have small business districts.

Stinson also established the Stinson Bank in 1847 on the corner of James and King William Street in Hamilton. It lasted until 1900.

James Street (Hamilton, Ontario) arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

James Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at the base of the Niagara Escarpment from James Mountain Road, a mountain-access road in the city, originally was a one-way street going south throughout but now has sections of it that are two-way. It extends north to the city's waterfront at the North End where it ends at Guise Street West right in front of the Harbour West Marina Complex and the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club.

King William Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

King William Street is a Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at the western-end at James Street North and is a one-way street (Eastbound) until Mary Street, where it becomes a two-way street that ends at Wentworth Street North. It is named after King William IV of the United Kingdom.

He died 13 March 1864 at Hamilton, Ontario, and is buried in Hamilton Cemetery.

Tribute

The Stinson neighbourhood in Hamilton was named after him. It is bounded by Main Street East (north), Charlton Avenue East (south), Victoria Avenue South (west) and Wentworth Street South (east). Landmarks in this neighbourhood include St. Patrick's Roman Catholic church. [2]

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John Street (Hamilton, Ontario) street in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Hess Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Wellington Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Queen Street (Hamilton, Ontario) street in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Victoria Avenue (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Catharine Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Wentworth Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Main Street (Hamilton, Ontario) Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

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Hunter Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Charlton Avenue (Hamilton, Ontario)

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References

  1. Bailey, Thomas Melville (1992). Dictionary of Hamilton Biography (Vol III, 1925-1939). W.L. Griffin Ltd.
  2. "Experience Hamilton: Tourist Guide 2006/2007". Tourism Hamilton: 34–35. Winter 2006.