Thomas Strong

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Thomas Strong may refer to:

Dr. L. Thomas Strong III is the Dean of Leavell College at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and teaches New Testament and Greek in Leavell College. He serves as senior pastor of Metairie Baptist Church in Metairie, Louisiana.

Thomas Strong (bishop) Theologian, academic administrator, and bishop

Thomas Banks Strong was an English theologian who was Bishop of Ripon and Oxford. He was also Dean of Christ Church, Oxford and served as Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University during the First World War.

Thomas Philips Strong was an English professional football left back and left half who played in the Football League for Lincoln City.

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