Thomas Stucley (MP)

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Sir Thomas Stucley (24 August 1620 – 20 September 1663) of Affeton Castle, Devon was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1661 to 1663. He fought in the Royalist army in the English Civil War.

Affeton Castle

Affeton Castle is a converted late-medieval gatehouse near East Worlington, Devon, England. It was formerly part of the destroyed fortified manor house of Affeton, situated on the side of a valley of the Little Dart River. Built in 1434, the surrounding house was destroyed in the English Civil War of the 1640s, and by the early 19th century the gatehouse was in ruins. It was restored between 1868-9 by Sir George Stucley, 1st Baronet for use as a shooting-box; in 1956, it was converted to form the private home of Sir Dennis Stucley, 5th Baronet. The castle, approximately 60 feet by 22 feet in size, is protected as a Grade II* listed building.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

English Civil War series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists

The English Civil War (1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's governance. The first (1642–1646) and second (1648–1649) wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third (1649–1651) saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The war ended with the Parliamentarian victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651.

Former gatehouse of Affeton manor house Affeton gatehouse500.jpeg
Former gatehouse of Affeton manor house

Biography

Stucley was the eldest son of John Stucley of Affeton, West Worlington, Devon, and his first wife Honor Hals, daughter of Richard Hals of Kennedon, Sherford. [1] He matriculated at Wadham College, Oxford on 19 May 1637, aged 17. [2] In 1638, he succeeded to West Worlinton on the death of his father. He was J.P. for Devon from 1643 to 1646 and was a distinguished soldier in the Royalist army during the Civil War. He was a major of horse from 1643 to 1646 and was a colonel by the time of the surrender of Exeter in that year. [1]

West Worlington village in the United Kingdom

West Worlington is a small village and former civil and ecclesiastical parish in Mid-Devon, England. It is situated about 2 miles west of Witheridge. In the parish is the historic estate, formerly a separate parish, of Affeton, the ancient seat of the Stucley family. Through the parish flows the Little Dart River. The parish church is dedicated to St Mary. In 1885 the parish was merged for civic administrative purposes into the neighbouring small parish of East Worlington, and in 1919 it was merged into the ecclesiastical parish of East Worlington, the parish church of which is also dedicated to St Mary, to form a single ecclesiastical parish.

Wadham College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Wadham College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. It is located in the centre of Oxford, at the intersection of Broad Street and Parks Road.

On the Restoration, Stucley was knighted on 27 May 1660. He was reinstated as J.P in June 1660 and became Deputy Lieutenant and commissioner for assessment in August 1660, remaining in those posts until his death. He was captain of horse in the regiment of Francis, Lord Hawley from July to November 1660. In 1661, he was elected Member of Parliament for Tiverton in the Cavalier Parliament. He was commissioner for loyal and indigent officers in 1662 and commissioner for corporations from 1662 to 1663. [1]

The Restoration 1660 restoration of the English monarchy

The Restoration of the English monarchy took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II. This followed the Interregnum, also called the Protectorate, that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms.

Tiverton (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Tiverton was a constituency located in Tiverton in east Devon, formerly represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Enfranchised as a parliamentary borough in 1615 and first represented in 1621, it elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) by the first past the post system of election until 1885. The name was then transferred to a county constituency electing one MP.

Cavalier Parliament ruling body of 17th century England

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679. It was the longest English Parliament, enduring for nearly 18 years of the quarter-century reign of Charles II of England. Like its predecessor, the Convention Parliament, it was overwhelmingly Royalist and is also known as the Pensioner Parliament for the many pensions it granted to adherents of the King.

Stucley died at the age of 43 and was buried at West Worlington. [1]

Stucley married in about 1642, Elizabeth Sydenham, daughter of Sir Ralph Sydenham of Youlston, and had two sons and four daughters. His sons died young, and his estate eventually went to his brother Lewis Stucley, a "famous independent" preacher. [1] [2]

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References

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Robert Shapcote
Henry Newte
Member of Parliament for Tiverton
1661–1663
With: Thomas Carew
Succeeded by
Thomas Carew
Sir Henry Ford