Thomas Sullivan (American football)

Last updated
Thomas Sullivan
Sport(s) Football, baseball
Biographical details
Born(1892-09-14)September 14, 1892
Messina Springs, New York
Playing career
Football
1910–1913 Colgate
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
c. 1914 Colgate (assistant)
1915 Compton HS (CA)
1916 George Washington
1918 Camp Merritt (NJ)
1919–1920 Bates
1921 Colgate (ends)
1922 St. Lawrence (assistant)
1925–1937 St. Lawrence
Baseball
1925–1938 St. Lawrence

Thomas Talbot Sullivan (September 14, 1892 – ?) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at George Washington University in 1916, Bates College from 1919 to 1920, and St. Lawrence University from 1925 to 1937. Sullivan played college football as an end at Colgate University. [1] He also coached baseball at St. Lawrence. [2] [3] Sullivan returned to his alma mater, Colgate, in 1921 as an assistant football coach under head coach Ellery Huntington Jr. [4]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

George Washington University university in Washington, D.C.

The George Washington University is a private research university in Washington, D.C. It was chartered in 1821 by an act of the United States Congress.

Bates College university in Maine, United States

Bates College is a private liberal arts college in Lewiston, Maine. Anchored by the Historic Quad, the campus of Bates totals 813 acres (329 ha) with a small urban campus and 33 off-site Victorian Houses distributed throughout the city. It maintains 600 acres (240 ha) of nature preserve known as the "Bates-Morse Mountain" near Campbell Island and a coastal center on Atkins Bay. With an annual enrollment of approximately 1,800 students, it is the smallest college in its athletic conference. As a result of its small student body, Bates retains selective admission rates and little to no transfer percentages. The nominal cost of attendance is considered very high with tuition frequently among the most expensive in the United States.

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