Thomas Sullivan (American football)

Last updated
Thomas Sullivan
Biographical details
Born(1892-09-14)September 14, 1892
Massena, New York
DiedNovember 30, 1958(1958-11-30) (aged 66)
Massena, New York
Playing career
Football
1910–1913 Colgate
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
c. 1914 Colgate (assistant)
1915 Compton HS (CA)
1916 George Washington
1918 Camp Merritt (NJ)
1919–1920 Bates
1921 Colgate (ends)
1922 St. Lawrence (assistant)
1924 Clarkson (assistant)
1925–1937 St. Lawrence
Baseball
1925–1938 St. Lawrence
Head coaching record
Overall57–47–9

Thomas Talbot Sullivan (September 14, 1892 – November 30, 1958) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at George Washington University in 1916, Bates College from 1919 to 1920, and St. Lawrence University from 1925 to 1937. Sullivan played college football as an end at Colgate University. [1] He also coached baseball at St. Lawrence. [2] [3] Sullivan returned to his alma mater, Colgate, in 1921 as an assistant football coach under head coach Ellery Huntington Jr. [4] He died on November 30, 1958, at Massena Memorial Hospital in Massena, New York, after suffering a heart attack. [5]

Contents

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
George Washington Hatchetites (Independent)(1916)
1916 George Washington 3–3–1
George Washington:3–3–1
Bates Bobcats (Maine Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1919–1920)
1919 Bates1–4–1
1920 Bates2–4–1
Bates:3–8–2
St. Lawrence Saints (New York State Conference)(1925–1937)
1925 St. Lawrence6–0–1
1926 St. Lawrence4–2–12–14th
1927 St. Lawrence3–3–1
1928 St. Lawrence3–32–15th
1929 St. Lawrence4–3
1930 St. Lawrence4–3
1931 St. Lawrence5–2
1932 St. Lawrence2–4–1
1933 St. Lawrence4–2–1
1934 St. Lawrence4–3
1935 St. Lawrence6–2
1936 St. Lawrence2–4–1
1937 St. Lawrence4–4
St. Lawrence:51–36–6
Total:57–47–9

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References

  1. "Sullivan Is Football Coach Of George Washington Team". The Washington Post . Washington, D.C. May 28, 1916. p. 2. Retrieved March 21, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "Tom Sullivan to Coach St. Lawrence Nine". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle . Brooklyn, New York. April 20, 1925. p. 22. Retrieved March 21, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  3. "Sullivan Will be Replaced At St. Lawrence Next Year". The Morning News . Wilmington, Delaware. Associated Press. November 18, 1937. p. 13. Retrieved March 21, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  4. "Huntington Reappointed; Is Named Again to Direct Football Work at Colgate". The New York Times . May 2, 1921. p. 19. Retrieved March 21, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  5. "Sullivan Dies at 66; Ex-Football Coach". The Record . Troy, New York. December 2, 1958. p. 20. Retrieved July 16, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .