Thomas Sully Residence

Last updated
Thomas Sully Residence

Thomas Sully House, 530 Spruce Street, Philadelphia (Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania) cropped.jpg

Thomas Sully Residence
Street map of Philadelphia and surrounding area.png
Red pog.svg
USA Pennsylvania location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location 530 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 39°56′42″N75°9′5″W / 39.94500°N 75.15139°W / 39.94500; -75.15139 Coordinates: 39°56′42″N75°9′5″W / 39.94500°N 75.15139°W / 39.94500; -75.15139
Built 1828
NRHP reference # 66000691
Significant dates
Added to NRHP October 15, 1966 [1]
Designated NHL December 21, 1965 [2]

The Thomas Sully Residence is a historic rowhouse at 530 Spruce Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. It was briefly (1828-29) a home of painter Thomas Sully (1783-1872), who lived in Philadelphia for the last 64 years of his life. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965. [2] [3] It is a private residence, and is not open to the public.

Philadelphia Largest city in Pennsylvania, United States

Philadelphia, sometimes known colloquially as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city, with a 2017 census-estimated population of 1,580,863. Since 1854, the city has been coterminous with Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 million residents as of 2017. Philadelphia is also the economic and cultural anchor of the greater Delaware Valley, located along the lower Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis. The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

Pennsylvania State of the United States of America

Pennsylvania, officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware to the southeast, Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, Lake Erie and the Canadian province of Ontario to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey to the east.

Thomas Sully American artist

Thomas Sully was an American portrait painter. Born in Great Britain, he lived most of his life in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He painted in the style of Thomas Lawrence. His subjects included national political leaders, such as presidents Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams, and General Marquis de Lafayette, and many leading musicians and composers.

Contents

Description and history

The Thomas Sully House is located in Philadelphia's Center City, on the south side of Spruce Street roughly midway between 5th and 6th Streets. It is one of several brick rowhouses on the block. It is 3-1/2 stories in height, with a gabled roof pierced by a single gabled dormer. The facade is three bays wide, with the entrance in the rightmost bay. The entrance is framed by pilasters, and a transom window with cornice above. The trim is all white marble. The building is not architecturally distinguished. [3]

Center City, Philadelphia Neighborhood of Philadelphia in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Center City includes the central business district and central neighborhoods of Philadelphia, in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. It comprises the area that made up the City of Philadelphia prior to the Act of Consolidation, 1854 which extended the city borders to be coterminous with Philadelphia County. Greater Center City has grown into the second-most populated downtown area in the United States, after Midtown Manhattan in New York City, with an estimated 183,240 residents in 2015.

Plaque on the former home of Thomas Sully in Society Hill, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ThomasSullyHousePlaque.jpg
Plaque on the former home of Thomas Sully in Society Hill, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The house was built in 1820, with subsequent construction in 1860. [4] It is one of many homes occupied by the painter Thomas Sully during 64 years of residence in the city. Although he was born in England, Sully came to the United States as a child in 1792, and became one of the nation's most prolific painters of the first half of the 19th century, producing more than 2,600 works in his long career. After living in Charleston, South Carolina and New York City, Sully came to Philadelphia in 1808. It remained his home until his death in 1872, although he is recorded as living at many different local addresses. [3]

Charleston, South Carolina City in the United States

Charleston is the oldest and largest city in the U.S. state of South Carolina, the county seat of Charleston County, and the principal city in the Charleston–North Charleston–Summerville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city lies just south of the geographical midpoint of South Carolina's coastline and is located on Charleston Harbor, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean formed by the confluence of the Ashley, Cooper, and Wando rivers. Charleston had an estimated population of 134,875 in 2017. The estimated population of the Charleston metropolitan area, comprising Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties, was 761,155 residents in 2016, the third-largest in the state and the 78th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States and thus also in the state of New York. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Center City, Philadelphia Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Center City, Philadelphia.

Related Research Articles

Overbrook, Philadelphia Neighborhood of Philadelphia in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States

Overbrook is a neighborhood northwest of West Philadelphia, Philadelphia, in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The area's housing ranges from large, old homes to rowhouses to 3- and 4-story apartment buildings.

Thomas Eakins House

The Thomas Eakins House is a historic house at 1727-29 Mount Vernon Street in the Spring Garden section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Built about 1854, it was for most of his life the home of Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), one of the most influential American artist of the late 19th century. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1965, and is now home to a local artist cooperative.

Ida B. Wells-Barnett House house

The Ida B. Wells-Barnett House was the residence of civil rights advocate Ida B. Wells, (1862–1931) and her husband Ferdinand Lee Barnett from 1919 to 1930. It is located at 3624 S. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in the Douglas community area of Chicago, Illinois. It was designated a Chicago Landmark on October 2, 1995. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and as a National Historic Landmark on May 30, 1974.

Stephen Decker Rowhouse

The Stephen Decker Rowhouse is a historic multiple residence in the Columbia-Tusculum neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio, United States. Built in 1889, it occupies land that was originally a portion of the wide vineyards of Nicholas Longworth. In 1869, after his death, Longworth's estate was platted and sold to builders who constructed a residential neighborhood along Tusculum Avenue. One of the most unusual buildings was the Decker rowhouse, which features multiple distinctive Victorian elements. Chief among these is the ornamentation on the porch roofs: they include gabled rooflines and beveled corners supported by multiple spindles. Connecting these porch roofs are low normal roofs, which primarily protect the recessed entrances to the houses. Elsewhere, the houses feature double-hung windows, imbricated shingles on the gables, and arcades of Gothic Revival panelling, and numerous ornamental circles inscribed within squares. Taken as a single building, the rowhouse measures two bays wide and eighteen bays long; it is of frame construction and two stories tall. Rated "outstanding" by an architectural survey in 1978, it is the only rowhouse of its type in Cincinnati, due to its well-preserved Victorian architecture.

Alfred E. Smith House

The Alfred E. Smith House is a historic rowhouse at 25 Oliver Street in the Two Bridges section of Lower Manhattan. Probably built in the late 19th century, it was the home of four-time governor of New York State and 1928 Democratic presidential candidate Alfred E. Smith (1873-1944). Smith lived here from 1907 to 1923. The house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.

James Weldon Johnson Residence

The James Weldon Johnson Residence is a historic apartment house located at 187 West 135th Street, Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is here where James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) lived from 1925 until his death. In addition to being a composer, songwriter, and author, he was an outspoken advocate for civil rights, working in various roles at the NAACP, including as its General Secretary during his residency here. The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Duke Ellington House

The Duke Ellington House is a historic residence at 935 St. Nicholas Avenue, in Manhattan, New York City. Apartment 4A in this apartment house was the home of Duke Ellington (1899-1974), the noted African American composer and jazz pianist, from 1939 through 1961. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Alexander Wade House

The Alexander Wade House is a historic house at 256 Prairie Street in Morgantown, West Virginia. Built in 1860, it was the home of educator Alexander Wade (1832-1904) from 1872 until his death. Wade is credited with developing a system of grade promotional exams and graduations that was widely adopted in the late 19th century. The house was declared a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1965.

Benjamin West Birthplace

The Benjamin West Birthplace is a historic home located on the campus of Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Delaware County, Pennsylvania. It was the birthplace of artist Benjamin West (1738-1820), who was an influential mentor to a generation of American painters, including Gilbert Stuart and Charles Willson Peale. His birthplace was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965, and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966. It presently serves as Swarthmore's visitor information center.

Frances Ellen Watkins Harper House historic row house in Philadelphia

The Frances Ellen Watkins Harper House is a historic row house at 1006 Bainbridge Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Of uncertain construction date, it was the home of Frances Harper (1825-1911) from 1870 until her death. Harper was a prominent African-American abolitionist, women's rights and civil rights activist, and author. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Hill–Physick–Keith House home of Philip Syng Physick (1768-1837)

The Hill–Physick–Keith House, also known as the Hill–Keith–Physick House, the Hill–Physick House, or simply the Physick House, is a historic house museum located at 321 S. 4th Street in the Society Hill neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Built 1786, it was the home of Philip Syng Physick (1768–1837), who has been called "the father of American surgery". The house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976. It is now owned and operated by the Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks as a house museum.

J. Peter Lesley House

The J. Peter Lesley House is a historic row house at 1008 Clinton Street in the Washington Square neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. A National Historic Landmark, it was for 27 years the home of John Peter Lesley (1819-1903), one of the leading geologists of the second half of the 19th century. The house is a private residence, and is not open to the public.

Reynolds-Morris House

The Reynolds-Morris House is a historic house at 225 South 8th Street in the Washington Square West neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Built in 1786–87 by John and William Reynolds, it is a well-preserved example of a Philadelphia Georgian townhouse. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1967, and is currently operated as a hotel.

Henry O. Tanner House historic house in Philadelphia

The Henry O. Tanner House is a historic house at 2908 West Diamond Street in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. It was from 1872 to 1888 the childhood home of Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937), an African-American artist who was the first of his race to be elected to National Academy of Design. This rowhouse was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Zalmon Richards House

The Zalmon Richards House is a historic house at 1301 Corcoran Street Northwest in Washington, D.C.. A Second Empire rowhouse, it was home from 1882 until his death of Zalmon Richards (1811-1899), founder of the National Education Association. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965. It is a private residence.

William H. Welch House

The William H. Welch House is a three-story rowhouse located at 935 St. Paul Street in Baltimore, Maryland. Probably built in the 1880s, it is notable as the residence of William H. Welch (1850-1934) from 1891 to 1908. Welch was one of the "Big Four" founding professors at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and an important conduit of European medical research methods and ideas to the United States. He was also the first dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the first director of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. The house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976, and is included in the Baltimore National Heritage Area.

Building at 38–48 Richardson Avenue

The Building at 38–48 Richardson Avenue is a historic residential rowhouse in Wakefield, Massachusetts. Built c. 1912, is believed to be one of the oldest rowhouses in the town. They were built by Solon O. Richardson, Jr., on a portion of his family's estate. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.

Building at 1–6 Walnut Terrace

1–6 Walnut Terrace in the Newtonville village of Newton, Massachusetts is a distinctive Shingle style rowhouse. Built in 1887, it is one of the city's few examples of a 19th-century rowhouse. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

Hockley Row

Hockley Row – also known as Evans Row or Victoria House – is a set of four architecturally significant rowhouses, located in the Rittenhouse Square West neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Capt. Thomas Moore House

Capt. Thomas Moore House is a historic home located in the Queen Village neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is located in between the Nathaniel Irish House, to the south, and Widow Maloby's Tavern, to the north. It was built in 1767, and is a 3 1/2-story, three bay brick rowhouse. This house is believed to have been built by Nathaniel Irish.

References

  1. National Park Service (2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. 1 2 "Thomas Sully Residence". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-02-17.
  3. 1 2 3 Richard E. Greenwood (October 9, 1974). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Thomas Sully Residence" (pdf). National Park Service. and Accompanying one photo, exterior, from 1974  (32 KB)
  4. Gombach, Julia. "Philadelphia National Historic Landmarks". livingplaces.com. Retrieved June 2010.Check date values in: |access-date= (help)