Thomas Suozzi

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Suozzi declared his candidacy for governor of New York in the Democratic primary against Eliot Spitzer on February 25, 2006. The bid appeared from the start to be something of a long shot given Spitzer's reputation as a "corporate crusader", though Suozzi often pointed out that he prevailed as a long shot before when he first ran for Nassau County Executive.

Few prominent Democrats apart from Nassau County Democratic Party Chairman Jay Jacobs supported his bid; most of New York's Democratic legislators and mayors campaigned for Spitzer. One of Suozzi's biggest supporters was Victor Rodriguez, founder of the now disbanded Voter Rights Party. Rodriguez eventually became the lead field organizer for Suozzi's Albany campaign office. The campaign was funded in part by Home Depot co-founder Kenneth Langone, former NYSE CEO Richard Grasso, David Mack of the MTA, and many people on Wall Street whom Spitzer had investigated and prosecuted. [23]

On June 13, 2006, Suozzi spoke before the New York State Conference of Mayors along with Spitzer and John Faso. Suozzi received a standing ovation from the crowd of mayors. [24] On July 6, Suozzi announced to his followers that he had collected enough petitions to place himself on the primary ballot. During a debate, he said he had presidential aspirations. [25] [26] On August 7, after much speculation, Suozzi announced that he would not seek an independent line were he to lose the primary. [27]

2022 New York gubernatorial campaign

On November 29, 2021, Suozzi announced his candidacy for governor of New York in the 2022 election. [28] He lost the Democratic primary to incumbent governor Kathy Hochul. [7]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2016

In June 2016, Suozzi won a five-way Democratic primary in New York's 3rd congressional district. [29] He was endorsed by The New York Times, Newsday, and The Island Now. [30] [31] [32] He defeated Republican State Senator Jack Martins in the general election on November 8, and began representing New York's 3rd congressional district in the 115th United States Congress in January 2017. [2]

2018

In June 2018, Suozzi won the Democratic primary unopposed. In the general election, Suozzi defeated Republican nominee Dan DeBono, a future Trump administration Chief Infrastructure Funding Officer and former trader and investment banker, by 18 points. [33] [34]

2020

In June 2020, Suozzi won a three-way Democratic primary in New York's 3rd congressional district with 66.5% of the votes. [35] In the general election, he defeated Republican nominee George Santos by over 12 points. [36] [37]

Tenure

Suozzi with President Joe Biden and Adriano Espaillat in 2021 P20210825AS-1951 (51645285649).jpg
Suozzi with President Joe Biden and Adriano Espaillat in 2021

As of November 2021, Suozzi had voted in line with Joe Biden's stated position 100% of the time. [38]

He is vice-chair of the Bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, which comprises 22 Democrats and 22 Republicans. He also co-chairs the Long Island Sound Caucus, co-chairs the Quiet Skies Caucus, and chairs the United States Merchant Marine Academy’s Board of Visitors. [3] [39] [40] Suozzi is a member of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, [41] the United States Congressional International Conservation Caucus [42] the Climate Solutions Caucus, [43] is a Commissioner on the Congressional Executive Commission on China, and is the Chairman of the Congressional Uyghur Caucus.

In Congress, Suozzi authored and is the leading voice on legislation to restore the State and Local Tax (SALT) Deduction, which was capped at $10,000 in 2017. [44] Through his work, Suozzi orchestrated a call from the New York Congressional Delegation for the repeal of the SALT cap. [45]

In 2022, Suozzi strongly opposed a proposal by Governor Kathy Hochul to permit homeowners to add an accessory dwelling unit (such as an extra apartment and backyard cottage) on lots zoned for single-family housing. [46] The proposal was intended to alleviate New York's housing shortage and make housing more affordable. [47] Suozzi said that he supported efforts to tackle housing problems, but that he was against "ending single-family housing". [47] [48]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Thomas Suozzi
Thomas Suozzi official photo.jpg
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from New York's 3rd district
In office
January 3, 2017 January 3, 2023
Nassau County Executive race
YearCandidateVotes%
2009Thomas Suozzi (D)117,87448%
Ed Mangano (R)118,11149%
New York 3rd Congressional District Race
YearCandidateVotes%
2016Thomas Suozzi (D)156,31552.4%
Jack Martins (R)142,02347.6%
New York 3rd Congressional District race
YearCandidateVotes%
2018Thomas Suozzi (D)157,45659.0%
Dan DeBono (R)109,51441.0%
New York 3rd Congressional District race
YearCandidateVotes%
2020Thomas Suozzi (D)208,55556.0%
George Santos (R)161,93143.5%

Personal life

Suozzi and his wife, Helene, have three children. Their son Joe played baseball at Boston College and is in the minor-league system of the New York Mets. [56]

See also

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References

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  6. Torrance, Luke (2018-11-07). "Suozzi, Rice win re-election as Democrats capture House - News". The Island Now. Retrieved 2020-02-12.
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Political offices
Preceded by
Donald DeRiggi
Mayor of Glen Cove
1993–2000
Succeeded by
Preceded by Executive of Nassau County
2001–2009
Succeeded by
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 3rd congressional district

2017–2023
Succeeded by
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded byas Former US Representative Order of precedence of the United States
as Former US Representative
Succeeded byas Former US Representative