Thomas Sweet

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Thomas Sweet
Personal information
Full nameThomas Shardalow Sweet
Born(1851-08-01)1 August 1851
Hackney, England
Died 17 March 1905(1905-03-17) (aged 53)
Melbourne, Australia
Source: ESPNcricinfo, 22 June 2016

Thomas Sweet (1 August 1851 17 March 1905) was a New Zealand cricketer. He played first-class cricket for Auckland and Canterbury between 1873 and 1877. [1] [2]

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

First-class cricket is an official classification of the highest-standard international or domestic matches in the sport of cricket. A first-class match is of three or more days' scheduled duration between two sides of eleven players each and is officially adjudged to be worthy of the status by virtue of the standard of the competing teams. Matches must allow for the teams to play two innings each although, in practice, a team might play only one innings or none at all.

Auckland cricket team cricket team in New Zealand

The Auckland Aces represent the Auckland region and are one of six New Zealand domestic first class cricket teams. Governed by the Auckland Cricket Association they are the most successful side having won 28 Plunket Shield titles, ten Ford Trophy championships and the Super Smash four times. The side currently play their home games at Eden Park Outer Oval.

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References

  1. "Thomas Sweet". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 22 June 2016.
  2. "Thomas Sweet". Cricket Archive. Retrieved 22 June 2016.