Thomas T. Munford

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Thomas T. Munford
ThomasMunford.jpg
Confederate Cavalry General Thomas T. Munford
BornMarch 29, 1831 (1831-03-29)
Richmond, Virginia
DiedFebruary 27, 1918 (1918-02-28) (aged 86)
Uniontown, Alabama
Place of burial
AllegianceFlag of the Confederate States of America (1865).svg  Confederate States of America
Service/branchBattle flag of the Confederate States of America.svg  Confederate States Army
Years of service1861–1865
Rank Confederate States of America Colonel.png Colonel
(Acting) Brigadier General (not confirmed by congress)
Commands held 2nd Virginia Cavalry
Munford's Cavalry Brigade
Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry Division
Battles/wars American Civil War
Other workplanter, manufacturer, writer

Thomas Taylor Munford (March 29, 1831 February 27, 1918) was an American farmer, iron, steel and mining company executive and Confederate colonel and acting brigadier general during the American Civil War.

Confederate States of America (de facto) federal republic in North America from 1861 to 1865

The Confederate States of America, commonly referred to as the Confederacy, was an unrecognized country in North America that existed from 1861 to 1865. The Confederacy was originally formed by seven secessionist slave-holding states—South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas—in the Lower South region of the United States, whose economy was heavily dependent upon agriculture, particularly cotton, and a plantation system that relied upon the labor of African-American slaves.

Colonel (United States) Military rank of the United States

In the United States Army, Marine Corps, and Air Force, colonel is the most senior field grade military officer rank, immediately above the rank of lieutenant colonel and immediately below the rank of brigadier general. It is equivalent to the naval rank of captain in the other uniformed services. The pay grade for colonel is O-6.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North (Union) and the South (Confederacy). The most studied and written about episode in U.S. history, the Civil War began primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people. War broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Contents

Biography

Thomas T. Munford Thomas T. Munford.jpg
Thomas T. Munford

Munford was born in Richmond, Virginia, to Colonel George Wythe Munford and Lucy Singleton Taylor. On July 30, 1849, Munford enrolled at Virginia Military Institute and was graduated in July 1852, [1] standing 14th in a class of 24. He married Elizabeth Henrietta Tayloe, daughter of Mary Langhorne and George Plater Tayloe, in 1853. Prior to the Civil War, Munford was a cotton planter in Mississippi and farmer in Bedford County, Virginia.

Richmond, Virginia Capital of Virginia

Richmond is a city in the U.S. state of Virginia and its capital. It is the center of the Richmond Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and the Greater Richmond Region. Richmond was incorporated in 1742 and has been an independent city since 1871.

Virginia Military Institute state-supported military college in Lexington, Virginia, USA

Founded 11 November 1839 in Lexington, Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) is the oldest state-supported military college and the first public Senior Military College in the United States. In keeping with its founding principles and unlike any other Senior Military College in the United States, VMI enrolls cadets only and awards baccalaureate degrees exclusively. VMI offers its students, all of whom are cadets, strict military discipline combined with a physically and academically demanding environment. The Institute grants degrees in 14 disciplines in engineering, the sciences and liberal arts, and all VMI students are required to participate in one of the four ROTC programs.

George Plater Tayloe American aristocrat

George Plater Tayloe was a Virginia businessman, soldier and legislator who also served as one of the original trustees of Hollins University.

With the outbreak of the Civil War, Munford was mustered into the Confederate States Army on May 8, 1861 by Colonel Jubal A. Early and served as a lieutenant colonel with the 30th Virginia Volunteer Regiment, [1] a mounted infantry regiment, which fought at the First Battle of Manassas. [2] When the cavalry was reorganized under J.E.B. Stuart, he was promoted to colonel of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry as the 30th Virginia Volunteer Regiment had been redesignated. [1] In the 1862 Shenandoah Valley Campaign, Munford served under Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson as commander of a cavalry brigade of two regiments, [2] succeeded Colonel and acting Brigadier General Turner Ashby as commander of all of Jackson's cavalry, upon that officer's death, and fought well at the Battle of Cross Keys and captured many prisoners at Harrisonburg, Virginia. [3] During the Peninsula Campaign, he led his men at the Battle of White Oak Swamp. [3] He served with efficiency in the Second Manassas Campaign in which he was slightly wounded at Turkey Run Bridge and the Second Battle of Bull Run. [2] Munford was temporarily given an independent command of Robertson's brigade in the Maryland Campaign. [2] During that campaign he successfully cleared Leesburg, Virginia of Union forces at the Battle of Mile Hill so that the army could cross the Potomac River from there. He led his troops in a key defensive position protecting Crampton's Gap at the Battle of South Mountain. [3] His men saw limited action at the Battle of Antietam. [3] They participated in several of Stuart's cavalry battles during the 1863 Gettysburg Campaign and the Bristoe Campaign, [3] as well as in cavalry actions in the Overland Campaign in Spring 1864 under Major General Fitzhugh Lee. [3]

Confederate States Army Army of the Confederate States

The Confederate States Army was the military land force of the Confederate States of America (Confederacy) during the American Civil War (1861–1865), fighting against the United States forces. On February 28, 1861, the Provisional Confederate Congress established a provisional volunteer army and gave control over military operations and authority for mustering state forces and volunteers to the newly chosen Confederate president, Jefferson Davis. Davis was a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, and colonel of a volunteer regiment during the Mexican–American War. He had also been a United States Senator from Mississippi and U.S. Secretary of War under President Franklin Pierce. On March 1, 1861, on behalf of the Confederate government, Davis assumed control of the military situation at Charleston, South Carolina, where South Carolina state militia besieged Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, held by a small U.S. Army garrison. By March 1861, the Provisional Confederate Congress expanded the provisional forces and established a more permanent Confederate States Army.

2nd Virginia Cavalry

The 2nd Virginia Volunteer Cavalry Regiment was a cavalry regiment raised in Virginia for service in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It fought mostly with the Army of Northern Virginia.

Jacksons Valley Campaign 1862 campaign in the American Civil War

Jackson's Valley Campaign, also known as the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1862, was Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's spring 1862 campaign through the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia during the American Civil War. Employing audacity and rapid, unpredictable movements on interior lines, Jackson's 17,000 men marched 646 miles (1,040 km) in 48 days and won several minor battles as they successfully engaged three Union armies, preventing them from reinforcing the Union offensive against Richmond.

Munford was appointed to duty as a brigadier commander by Fitzhugh Lee on November 9, 1864, but, despite being described as a general in several sources, he was never officially commissioned and confirmed as a brigadier general. [1] He took command of Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry division late in the war with that general's promotion to cavalry corps commander [2] and fought at Five Forks, High Bridge, and Sailor's Creek. [3] He led men away from the Army of Northern Virginia prior to General Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House and escaped with a goal of reaching North Carolina to link up with the army of General Joseph E. Johnston during the Carolinas Campaign. [4] However, hearing that Johnston had since surrendered, Munford dispersed his force after reaching Lynchburg, Virginia. [2] [4]

Battle of Five Forks 1865 battle during the American Civil War

The Battle of Five Forks was fought on April 1, 1865, southwest of Petersburg, Virginia, around the road junction of Five Forks, Dinwiddie County, at the end of the Siege of Petersburg, near the conclusion of the American Civil War.

Battle of High Bridge

The Battle of High Bridge refers to two engagements fought on April 6, 1865 and April 7, 1865, near the end of the Appomattox Campaign of the American Civil War about 4 miles (6.4 km) northeast of Farmville, Virginia. The first battle is often the one identified as the Battle of High Bridge.

Battle of Sailors Creek Battle of the American Civil War

The Battle of Sailor's Creek was fought on April 6, 1865, near Farmville, Virginia, as part of the Appomattox Campaign, near the end of the American Civil War. It was the last major engagement between the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee and the Union Army under the overall direction of Union General-in-Chief Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant.

His first wife died in 1863, and Munford was remarried to her cousin, Emma Tayloe, daughter of Henrietta Ogle and William Henry Tayloe, in 1866. After the war, Munford inherited his father-in-law's plantation, Oakland, in Perry County, Alabama and worked as a cotton planter in Alabama. [1] He returned to Virginia and worked as a cotton planter and as an iron manufacturer and writer. [1] He was Vice President of Lynchburg Iron, Steel & Mining Company. [1] [2] He served as President of the Virginia Military Institute Board of Visitors from 1884 to 1888. [2] [4]

William Henry Tayloe

William Henry Tayloe was an American plantation owner, horse breeder, businessman and land speculator during the first half of the 19th century. He inherited a vast estate from his father and expanded his holdings, pioneering new territory in the Canebrake region of Alabama.

Perry County, Alabama County in the United States

Perry County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,591. Its county seat is Marion. The county was established in 1819 and is named in honor of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry of Rhode Island and the United States Navy.

Iron Chemical element with atomic number 26

Iron is a chemical element with symbol Fe and atomic number 26. It is a metal, that belongs to the first transition series and group 8 of the periodic table. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust.


On February 27, 1918 at the age of 86, Munford died at the home of his son in Uniontown, Alabama. [1] He was buried at Spring Hill Cemetery in Lynchburg, Virginia. [1]

Uniontown, Alabama City in Alabama, United States

Uniontown is a city in Perry County, Alabama, in the United States of America. At the 2010 census, the population of the city was 1,775, up from 1,636 in 2000. The census estimate for 2014 gave the population as 2,471. The current mayor is Jamaal O. Hunter.

Lynchburg, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Lynchburg is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 75,568. The 2017 census estimates an increase to 81,000. Located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains along the banks of the James River, Lynchburg is known as the "City of Seven Hills" or the "Hill City". In the 1860s, Lynchburg was the only major city in Virginia that was not recaptured by the Union before the end of the American Civil War.

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Eicher, John H., and David J. Eicher, Civil War High Commands. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001. ISBN   978-0-8047-3641-1. p. 606.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Allardice, Bruce S. More Generals in Gray. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1995. ISBN   978-0-8071-3148-0. p. 171.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Hotchkiss, Jed. Virginia. Volume 3 in Evans, Clement A., ed. Confederate Military History: A Library of Confederate States History. 12 vols. Atlanta: Confederate Publishing Company, 1899. OCLC   833588. p. 640. Retrieved January 20, 2011.
  4. 1 2 3 Hotchkiss, 1899, p. 641.

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