Thomas T. Reilley

Last updated
Thomas T. Reilley
Biographical details
BornMarch 20, 1883 [1]
New York, New York
DiedJanuary 27, 1940
Mount Vernon, New York [2]
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1914–1915 NYU
Head coaching record
Overall9–7–2

Thomas Thornton Reilley (March 20, 1883 – January 27, 1940) was an American football coach. He served the 12th head football coach at New York University (NYU). He held that position for two seasons, 1914 and 1915, leading the NYU Violets to a record of 9–7–2. [3] Having come off a scoreless, losing season in 1913 under Jake High, NYU's record under Reilley in 1914 of 5–3–1 showed a marked improvement. However, Reilleys' tenure at NYU ended in 1915 with a 70–0 loss to Rutgers. [4]

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

New York University private research university in New York, NY, United States

New York University (NYU) is a private research university originally founded in New York City but now with campuses and locations throughout the world. Founded in 1831, NYU's historical campus is in Greenwich Village, New York City. As a global university, students can graduate from its degree-granting campuses in NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai, as well as study at its 12 academic centers in Accra, Berlin, Buenos Aires, Florence, London, Los Angeles, Madrid, Paris, Prague, Sydney, Tel Aviv, and Washington, D.C.

The NYU Violets football team represented the New York University Violets in college football.

Contents

Reilley was a Democratic member of the New York State Assembly (New York Co., 21st D.) in 1916.

New York State Assembly lower house of the New York State Legislature

The New York State Assembly is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Senate being the upper house. There are 150 seats in the Assembly, with each of the 150 Assembly districts having an average population of 128,652. Assembly members serve two-year terms without term limits.

139th New York State Legislature

The 139th New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 5 to April 20, 1916, during the second year of Charles S. Whitman's governorship, in Albany.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
NYU Violets (Independent)(1914–1915)
1914 NYU5–3–1
1915 NYU4–4–1
NYU:9–7–2
Total:9–7–2

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References

  1. New York, Military Service Cards, 1816-1979
  2. New York, Death Index, 1880-1956
  3. The Ultimate Guide to College Football, James Quirk, 2004
  4. 1915 NYU Football Season Statistics
New York Assembly
Preceded by
Harold C. Mitchell
New York State Assembly
New York County, 21st District

1916
Succeeded by
Harold C. Mitchell