Thomas T. Whittlesey

Last updated
Thomas Tucker Whittlesey
Member of the
United States House of Representatives
from Connecticut's 4th district
In office
April 29, 1836 March 3, 1839
Preceded byAt-large representation, districts established in 1837
Succeeded by Thomas Burr Osborne
Member of the Wisconsin Senate
In office
1853-1854
Personal details
Born(1798-12-08)December 8, 1798
Danbury, Connecticut
DiedAugust 20, 1868(1868-08-20) (aged 69)
Pheasant Branch, Wisconsin
Resting placeForest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wisconsin
Political party Jacksonian Democrat
Alma mater Yale College (1817)
Occupationlawyer

Thomas Tucker Whittlesey (December 8, 1798 – August 20, 1868) was a U.S. Representative from Connecticut, cousin of Elisha Whittlesey and Frederick Whittlesey.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they compose the legislature of the United States.

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

Elisha Whittlesey American politician

Elisha Whittlesey was a lawyer, civil servant and U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Born in Danbury, Connecticut, Whittlesey attended the public schools and was graduated from Yale College in 1817. He then attended Litchfield Law School, was admitted to the bar in 1818 and commenced practice in Danbury, Connecticut. He served as probate judge.

Danbury, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Danbury is a city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States, located approximately 50 miles (80 km) northeast of New York City making it part of the New York metropolitan area. Danbury's population at the 2010 census was 80,893. Danbury is the fourth most populous city in Fairfield County, and seventh among Connecticut cities. The city is within the New York combined statistical area and Bridgeport metropolitan area.

Yale College undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University

Yale College is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University. Founded in 1701, it is the original school of the university. Although other schools of the university were founded as early as 1810, all of Yale was officially known as Yale College until 1887, when its schools were confederated and the institution was renamed Yale University.

Litchfield Law School former home and law school in Litchfield, Connecticut

The Litchfield Law School of Litchfield, Connecticut was the first law school in the United States, having been established in 1773 by Tapping Reeve, who would later became the Chief Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court. By the time the school closed in 1833, over 1,100 students had attended the institution, including Aaron Burr and John C. Calhoun.

Whittlesey was elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-fourth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Zalmon Wildman. He was reelected as a Democrat to the Twenty-fifth Congress and served from April 29, 1836, to March 3, 1839. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1838 to the Twenty-sixth Congress. He moved to Pheasant Branch, near Madison, Wisconsin, in 1846. He resumed the practice of law and also engaged in agricultural pursuits. He served as member of the Wisconsin Senate in 1853 and 1854. He died at Pheasant Branch, Wisconsin, August 20, 1868. He was interred in Forest Hill Cemetery, Madison, Wisconsin.

Democratic-Republican Party Historical American political party

The Democratic-Republican Party was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration. From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves Republicans after their political philosophy, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist tendency to centralize and loosely interpret the Constitution, believing these policies were signs of monarchism and anti-republican values. The party splintered in 1824, with the faction loyal to Andrew Jackson coalescing into the Jacksonian movement, the faction led by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay forming the National Republican Party and some other groups going on to form the Anti-Masonic Party. The National Republicans, Anti-Masons, and other opponents of Andrew Jackson later formed themselves into the Whig Party.

24th United States Congress

The Twenty-fourth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1835, to March 4, 1837, during the seventh and eighth years of Andrew Jackson's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Fifth Census of the United States in 1830. Both chambers had a Jacksonian majority.

Zalmon Wildman was a United States Representative from Connecticut. He was born in Danbury, Connecticut where he completed preparatory studies. He was manufacturer of hats and he established the first hat stores in Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia in 1802. In addition, he was the first president of Danbury National Bank 1824-1826.

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References

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Zalmon Wildman
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Connecticut's at-large congressional district

18361837
Succeeded by
District inactive
Preceded by
District created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Connecticut's 4th congressional district

18371839
Succeeded by
Thomas Burr Osborne