Thomas Tackaberry

Last updated
Thomas Howard Tackaberry
ThomasHTackaberry.jpg
LTG. Thomas H. Tackaberry
Nickname(s)Tom
Born(1923-09-06)September 6, 1923
Los Angeles, California
DiedApril 3, 2017(2017-04-03) (aged 93)
Fayetteville, North Carolina
Place of burial
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Department of the Army Seal.svg United States Army
Years of service1942–1981
Rank Lieutenant General
Commands held United States Army Airborne School
245th Quartermaster Depot Supply Company
Platoon, 504th Airborne Infantry Regiment
Company K, 9th Infantry Regiment
2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
196th Infantry Brigade
82nd Airborne Division
XVIII Airborne Corps
Battles/wars World War II
Korean War
Vietnam War
Awards Distinguished Service Cross (3)
Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Army Distinguished Service Medal
Silver Star (5)
Legion of Merit (3)
Distinguished Flying Cross
Soldier's Medal
Bronze Star (3)
Purple Heart
Air Medal (52)

Thomas Howard Tackaberry (September 6, 1923 – April 3, 2017) was a lieutenant general in the United States Army. He was a veteran of World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War and was a recipient of three Distinguished Service Crosses and served as Commander of the XVIII Airborne Corps from 1979 to 1981. [1] [2] "Described as a 'grunt's angel', Lt. Gen. Tackaberry was devoted to his men, not only ensuring they were always supplied for the fight but physically prepared as well. Leading from the front, Lt. Gen. Tackaberry set a high bar for fitness with his men and led them on long training runs", stated Richard Hudson to the 115th congressional session on May 19, 2017. [3] Tackaberry is one of the highly decorated officers in the U.S. Army. He ranks among the 10 most decorated military servicemembers in the U.S. military history.

In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and the United States Air Force, lieutenant general is a three-star general officer rank, with the pay grade of O-9. Lieutenant general ranks above major general and below general. Lieutenant general is equivalent to the rank of vice admiral in the other uniformed services.

United States Army Land warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Army (USA) is the land warfare service branch of the United States Armed Forces. It is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States, and is designated as the Army of the United States in the United States Constitution. As the oldest and most senior branch of the U.S. military in order of precedence, the modern U.S. Army has its roots in the Continental Army, which was formed to fight the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783)—before the United States of America was established as a country. After the Revolutionary War, the Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army on 3 June 1784 to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The United States Army considers itself descended from the Continental Army, and dates its institutional inception from the origin of that armed force in 1775.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 70 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Contents

Years of Service

U.S. Army Reserve 1942-1943

U.S. Army 1943-1981

World War II 1942-1945

Cold War 1945-1981

Korean War 1952-1953

Vietnam War 1966-1967, 1969-1970

Korean War

In 1952, while serving as a company commander, he earned the Distinguished Service Cross for heroism near Chorwon, Korea when he voluntarily went to relieve a patrol which had lost its commander. Tackaberry directed the soldiers back toward their own lines and personally covered their retreat at the risk of his own life. He also received two Silver Stars for his service in Korea. [4]

Distinguished Service Cross (United States) US army medal for gallantry

The Distinguished Service Cross is the second highest military award that can be given to a member of the United States Army, for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not meet the criteria for the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross, the Air Force Cross, and the Coast Guard Cross.

Chorwon County County in Kangwŏn Province, North Korea

Ch'ŏrwŏn County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Portions of it were once a single county together with the county of the same name in South Korea; other portions were added from neighbouring counties in the 1952 reorganization of local governments. After the initial division of Korea, the entire county lay to the Northern side of the dividing line, but in the course of the Korean War part of the county was taken by the South.

Silver Star military decoration of the United States Armed Forces

The Silver Star Medal is the United States Armed Forces's third-highest personal decoration for valor in combat. The Silver Star Medal is awarded primarily to members of the United States Armed Forces for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States.

Vietnam War

LTG Tackaberry Lieutenant-general-thomas-h-tackaberry.jpg
LTG Tackaberry

In 1966 Tackaberry was serving in Vietnam as a lieutenant colonel and earned another |Distinguished Service Cross for heroism near Bồng Sơn, South Vietnam, when he led a search and destroy operation in which a 15-man platoon was pinned down and its leader killed. He then ordered his unarmed command helicopter to land near the firefight and ran through intense enemy fire to reach the platoon and assume command. When reinforcements arrived, he led an assault on enemy bunkers, forcing the larger North Vietnamese force to retreat. [5]

Vietnam Country in Southeast Asia

Vietnam, officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, is the easternmost country on the Indochina Peninsula. With an estimated 94.6 million inhabitants as of 2016, it is the 15th most populous country in the world. Vietnam shares its land borders with China to the north, and Laos and Cambodia to the west. It shares its maritime borders with Thailand through the Gulf of Thailand, and the Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysia through the South China Sea. Its capital city is Hanoi, while its most populous city is Ho Chi Minh City.

Bồng Sơn Place in Bình Định Province, Vietnam

Bồng Sơn is a town in the South Central Coast region of Vietnam. It is the administrative centre of Hoài Nhơn District in the north of Bình Định Province. It is 84km north of the provincial capital Quy Nhơn and 20km south of Quảng Ngãi Province.

South Vietnam Former country in southeast Asia

South Vietnam, officially the Republic of Vietnam, was a country that existed from 1955 to 1975, the period when the southern portion of Vietnam was a member of the Western Bloc during part of the Cold War. It received international recognition in 1949 as the "State of Vietnam", which was a constitutional monarchy (1949–1955). This became the "Republic of Vietnam" in 1955. Its capital was Saigon. South Vietnam was bordered by North Vietnam to the north, Laos to the northwest, Cambodia to the southwest, Thailand across the Gulf of Thailand to the southwest, and the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei, and Indonesia across the South China Sea to the east and southeast.

Col. Thomas Tackaberry the brigade commander of the 196th Infantry Brigade. COL T.H. Tackaberry (Americal).pdf
Col. Thomas Tackaberry the brigade commander of the 196th Infantry Brigade.

In 1969, he had been promoted to colonel|colonel and was the brigade commander of the 196th Infantry Brigade when he earned a third Distinguished Service Cross, making him one of the few individuals who had earned three or more Distinguished Service Crosses. Tackaberry also received three more Silver Stars for his service in Vietnam. He then served as Chief of Staff of the 23rd Infantry Division.

Colonel is a senior military officer rank below the brigadier and general officer ranks. However, in some small military forces, such as those of Monaco or the Vatican, colonel is the highest rank. It is also used in some police forces and paramilitary organizations.

196th Infantry Brigade (United States) brigade of the United States Army

The 196th Infantry Brigade ("Chargers"), also known as the Charger Brigade was first formed on 24 June 1921 as part of the United States Army Reserve's 98th Division with the responsibility of training soldiers.

Distinguished Service Cross (United Kingdom) British medal for act of gallantry

The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is a third level military decoration awarded to officers, and since 1993 ratings and other ranks, of the British Armed Forces, Royal Fleet Auxiliary and British Merchant Navy, and formerly also to officers of other Commonwealth countries.

Thomas Tackaberry on the military drop zone. Granddad.jpg
Thomas Tackaberry on the military drop zone.

Later life

Tackaberry and his wife Lilian had six children. Their twin sons, Burt and Kief Tackaberry served as officers in the Army. His eldest grandson, Lt Col. Andrew S. Tackaberry took command of 6th Battalion, 37th Field Artillery Regiment from June 2015 to 2017. Another grandson, Lt Col. Jonathan P. Tackaberry took command of 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment on May 2017.[ [6] Lt. Gen. Tackaberry retired from military service after 38 years. He then transitioned to managing a real estate business and couseling in the military of the Republic of China for BDC Corp. Tackaberry remained very dedicated to fitness all his life to include at the age of 93 years old and confined to a wheel chair. After being challenged by a family member he completed 10 push-ups on his feet. [3]

37th Field Artillery Regiment

The 37th Field Artillery Regiment is a field artillery regiment of the United States Army, and parent regiment under the U.S. Army Regimental System. The regiment was first constituted 5 July 1918 in the National Army. The regiment served with the 10th Division during World War I, and the 2nd Infantry Division during World War II. Elements of the regiment have served with the 2nd Infantry Division, 6th Infantry Division, 79th Infantry Division, and 172nd Infantry Brigade, among other units. Two battalions of the regiment are currently active, the 1st Battalion, 37th Field Artillery is the 155mm towed cannon battalion assigned to the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division and the 6th Battalion, 37th Field Artillery is a Multiple Launch Rocket System battalion in the 210th Field Artillery Brigade.

17th Cavalry Regiment

The 17th Cavalry Regiment is a historical organization within the United States Army that began as a regiment of cavalry after the Pancho Villa Expedition. The unit was constituted on 1 July 1916 in the Regular Army as the 17th Cavalry at Fort Bliss, Texas and originally inactivated 26 September 1921 at the Presidio of Monterey, California. Formerly a part of the 1950s Combat Arms Regimental System, it was reorganized as a part of the U.S. Army Regimental System, an ongoing effort to maintain the lineage and history of the U.S. Army through its units. Today, the 17th Cavalry Regiment is found across the army within the combat aviation brigades, where the squadrons, now constituted as attack/recon helicopter squadrons, carry on the legacy of the 17th Cavalry Regiment.

Thomas Tackaberry died on April 3, 2017. [7] [8] He was predeceased by his son Richard and daughter Elizabeth. He is buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery on August 23, 2017.

Arlington National Cemetery Military cemetery in the United States

Arlington National Cemetery is a United States military cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., in whose 624 acres (253 ha) the dead of the nation's conflicts have been buried, beginning with the Civil War, as well as reinterred dead from earlier wars. The United States Department of the Army, a component of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), controls the cemetery.

Awards and decorations

His military awards include: [9]

CIB2.png
Master Parachutist badge (United States).svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Distinguished Service Cross ribbon.svg
Defense Distinguished Service Medal ribbon.svg U.S. Army Distinguished Service Medal ribbon.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Silver Star ribbon.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Legion of Merit ribbon.svg
Distinguished Flying Cross ribbon.svg Soldier's Medal ribbon.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Bronze Star ribbon.svg
Purple Heart ribbon.svg Air Medal ribbon.svg Valor device.svg Award numeral 5.png Award numeral 2.png
Joint Service Commendation Medal ribbon.svg
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Army Commendation Medal ribbon.svg
Army Good Conduct ribbon.svg
American Campaign Medal ribbon.svg World War II Victory Medal ribbon.svg Army of Occupation ribbon.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
National Defense Service Medal ribbon.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Korean Service Medal - Ribbon.svg
Silver-service-star-3d.svg
Bronze-service-star-3d-vector.svg
Vietnam Service Medal ribbon.svg
Army Service Ribbon.svg Army Overseas Service Ribbon.svg Award numeral 7.png Vietnamese Gallantry Cross, with palm.svg
Award-star-silver-3d.png
Award-star-silver-3d.png
Vietnamese Gallantry Cross ribbon.svg
Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal Ribbon.png Vietnam Staff Service Medal Ribbon.png
United Nations Korea Medal ribbon.svg Vietnam Campaign Medal ribbon with 60- clasp.svg Republic of Korea War Service Medal ribbon.svg
Combat Infantryman Badge
(2nd Award)
Master Parachutist Badge
Distinguished Service Cross
with 2 bronze oak leaf clusters
Defense Distinguished Service Medal Army Distinguished Service Medal Silver Star
with 4 bronze oak leaf clusters
Legion of Merit
with 2 bronze oak leaf clusters
Distinguished Flying Cross Soldier's Medal
Bronze Star
with 2 bronze oak leaf clusters
Purple Heart Air Medal
with Combat V and Award numerals 52
Joint Service Commendation Medal Army Commendation Medal
with 1 bronze oak leaf cluster
Army Good Conduct Medal
American Campaign Medal World War II Victory Medal Army of Occupation Medal
National Defense Service Medal
with 1 bronze service star
Korean Service Medal
with 3 bronze campaign stars
Vietnam Service Medal
with 1 silver and 1 bronze campaign stars
Army Service Ribbon Army Overseas Service Ribbon
with Award numeral 7
Vietnam Cross of Gallantry
with 2 Palms
Vietnam Cross of Gallantry
with 2 Silver Stars
Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal
(1st Class)
Vietnam Staff Service Medal
(1st Class)
United Nations Korea Medal Vietnam Campaign Medal Republic of Korea War Service Medal
Bronze oakleaf-3d.svg
Valorous Unit Award ribbon.svg
Korean Presidential Unit Citation.png Gallantry Cross Unit Citation.png
Valorous Unit Award
with 1 bronze oak leaf cluster
Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation
with Palm

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References

  1. Martell, P.; Hayes, G.P.; Dupuy, T.N. (1974). World Defence Who's who. Macdonald and Jane's. ISBN   9780356080031 . Retrieved 2015-05-24.
  2. "Thomas H. Tackaberry". Veteran Tributes. Retrieved 2017-04-14.
  3. 1 2 "Congressional Record" (PDF). U.S. Government Publishing Office. 19 May 2017. Retrieved 10 May 2019.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. "Valor awards for Thomas H. Tackaberry". Military Times. Retrieved 2017-04-14.
  5. https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/5898#13546
  6. http://www.fayobserver.com/news/20170504/third-generation-paratrooper-takes-command-of-fort-bragg-squadron
  7. Brooks, Drew (April 5, 2017). "One of the Army's most decorated soldiers, former commander of 82nd Airborne and Fort Bragg, dies". Fayetteville Observer. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  8. Staff (April 6, 2017). "Retired Lt. Gen. Tackaberry, former commander of Fort Bragg, dies". Army Times. Retrieved 2017-04-14.
  9. https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/5898

Further reading

Kelly, B., & Wilcox, D. (1977). Americans. London: Hutchinson &.

Tackaberry, T. (1968). Social Science Research, Aid to Counterinsurgency. The American Journal of Economics and Sociology, 27(1), 1-8.Tackaberry, & Army War Coll Carlisle Barracks PA. (1966). US Military Personnel--Instrumentalities in Foreign Affairs.

Snider,Don.(1980) Vol. 116 No. 4 Time magaizine-In Florida- Jumping with the 82nd

FA Journal 1976 (FIST in FA Bns at Ft Bragg)Volume 44 September-October 1976 Number 5

Wilcox, D. (Writer). (n.d.). The Americans [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1989737/