Thomas Talbot, 2nd Viscount Lisle

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Thomas Talbot, 2nd Baron Lisle and 2nd Viscount Lisle (c. 1449 – 20 March 1470), [1] English nobleman, was the son of John Talbot, 1st Viscount Lisle and Joan Cheddar.

John Talbot, 1st Baron Lisle and 1st Viscount Lisle, English nobleman and medieval soldier, was the son of John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, and his second wife Margaret Beauchamp.

He married Margaret Herbert, the daughter of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke.

Upon the death of his grandmother Margaret Beauchamp in 1468, Lisle inherited her claims upon the lands of Baron Berkeley. He attempted to gain entrance to Berkeley Castle by bribery; but the plot was discovered, and in a fit of pique, he challenged Lord Berkeley to a trial of arms. The ensuing Battle of Nibley Green was the last battle on English soil fought entirely between private feudatories. The superior numbers of Berkeley won the day: Lisle's troops were routed, he was slain on the field, and Berkeley pillaged Lisle's manor of Wotton-under-Edge. Lady Lisle miscarried a son shortly thereafter; the Viscounty of Lisle became extinct, and the barony passed into abeyance between his two sisters.

Berkeley Castle castle in the town of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, UK

Berkeley Castle is a castle in the town of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, UK. The castle's origins date back to the 11th century and it has been designated by English Heritage as a grade I listed building.

Battle of Nibley Green

The Battle of Nibley Green was fought on 20 March 1469, between the troops of Thomas Talbot, 2nd Viscount Lisle and William Berkeley, 2nd Baron Berkeley. It is notable for being the last battle fought in England entirely between the private armies of feudal magnates.

Wotton-under-Edge market town within the Stroud district of Gloucestershire, England

Wotton-under-Edge is a market town within the Stroud district of Gloucestershire, England. Located near the southern end of the Cotswolds, the Cotswold Way long-distance footpath passes through the town. Standing on the B4058 Wotton is about 5 miles (8.0 km) from the M5 motorway. The nearest railway station is Cam and Dursley, 7 miles (11 km) away by road, on the Bristol to Birmingham line.

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References

Peerage of England
Preceded by
John Talbot
Viscount Lisle
1453–1470
Extinct
Baron Lisle
1453–1470
In abeyance
Title next held by
Elizabeth Talbot