Thomas Talbot (bishop)

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Thomas Joseph Talbot (14 February 1727 – 24 April 1795) was an English Roman Catholic bishop who served as the Vicar Apostolic of the Midland District from 1778 to until his death in 1795.

English people Nation and ethnic group native to England

The English people are a nation and an ethnic group native to England who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn. Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD. England is one of the countries of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living there are British citizens.

Life

Thomas Talbot was born in Heythrop, Oxfordshire on 17 February 1727, the fifth son of the Honourable George Talbot and Mary FitzWilliam. Thomas' eldest brother, George, succeeded as the 14th Earl of Shrewsbury, and another brother, James, was the Vicar Apostolic of the London District. [1]

Heythrop village and civil parish in West Oxfordshire, England

Heythrop is a village and civil parish just over 2 miles (3.2 km) east of Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire. The parish includes the hamlet of Dunthrop.

Oxfordshire County of England

Oxfordshire is a county in South East England. The ceremonial county borders Warwickshire to the north-west, Northamptonshire to the north-east, Buckinghamshire to the east, Berkshire to the south, Wiltshire to the south-west and Gloucestershire to the west.

Earl of Shrewsbury countship

Earl of Shrewsbury is a hereditary title of nobility created twice in the Peerage of England. The second earldom dates to 1442. The holder of the Earldom of Shrewsbury also holds the title of Earl of Waterford (1446) in the Peerage of Ireland and Earl Talbot (1784) in the Peerage of Great Britain. Shrewsbury and Waterford are the oldest earldoms in their peerages held by someone with no higher title, and as such the Earl of Shrewsbury is sometimes described as the premier earl of England and Ireland.

He attended Twyford School, and then Douai in 1739. In 1745-46, together with his brother James, he made the grand tour under the tutelage of Alban Butler. He then returned to Douai to study theology. [2]

Twyford School is a co-educational, independent, preparatory boarding and day school, located in the village of Twyford, Hampshire, England.

Alban Butler was an English Roman Catholic priest and hagiographer.

On the expulsion of the Jesuits from France, Talbot was named President of the College of St. Omer's in August, 1762. [1] In March 1776, he was consecrated to the titular See of Acon as coadjutor to Bishop Hornyold, whom he succeeded in the government of the Midland District in December, 1778. [2]

Colleges of St Omer, Bruges and Liège

The Colleges of St Omer, Bruges and Liège were successive expatriate institutions for the Catholic education of English students and were run by the Jesuits.

John Joseph Hornyold was an English Catholic bishop, titular Bishop of Phiomelia, and Vicar Apostolic of the Midland District, England for twenty-two years.

Bishop Tlbot died in Bristol in 1795, and was buried in St. Joseph's Church. [1]

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References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
John Joseph Hornyold
Vicar Apostolic of the Midland District
1778–1795
Succeeded by
Charles Berington