Thomas Talbot Bury

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Thomas Talbot Bury
Born26 November 1809
Died23 February 1877
NationalityBritish
OccupationArchitect

Thomas Talbot Bury (26 November 1809 – 23 February 1877) was a British architect and lithographer.

Bury was articled to Augustus Charles Pugin in 1824 and started his own practice in Soho in 1830. At various times he collaborated with other notable architects including Charles Lee (partners between 1845 and 1849), [1] Lewis Vulliamy and A. W. N. Pugin, with whom he detailed the Houses of Parliament under Sir Charles Barry.

Augustus Charles Pugin Anglo-French artist, architectural draughtsman, and writer on medieval architecture

Augustus Charles Pugin, born Auguste-Charles Pugin, (1762–1832) was an Anglo-French artist, architectural draughtsman, and writer on medieval architecture. He was born in Paris, then the Kingdom of France, but his father was Swiss, and Pugin himself was to spend most of his life in England.

Soho District in London, United Kingdom

Soho is an area of the City of Westminster, part of the West End of London. Originally a fashionable district for the aristocracy, it has been one of the main entertainment districts in the capital since the 19th century.

Charles Lee (British architect) British architect

Charles Lee FRIBA was a British architect, who designed the Polish Church of the Evangelist, Putney.

Bury's watercolour of the Moorish Arch at Edge Hill Moorish Arch looking from the Tunnel, from Bury's Liverpool and Manchester Railway, 1831 - artfinder 122454.jpg
Bury's watercolour of the Moorish Arch at Edge Hill

Bury's works included thirty-five churches and chapels, fifteen parsonages, twelve schools and twenty other large public buildings and private homes. His ecclesiastical works included St Mary the Virgin's Church, Woodlands (near West Kingsdown), Kent (1850); the chapels at Tonbridge cemetery (1856); St James's Church, Dover (1859); [2] and St John the Evangelist's Church in Burgess Hill, West Sussex (1861–63). [3] He also carried out a restoration of St Peter and St Paul's Church at Temple Ewell near Dover. [2]

West Kingsdown village in the United Kingdom

West Kingsdown is a village and civil parish in the Sevenoaks district of Kent, England, on the A20 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Swanley, 5.5 miles (9 km) northeast of Sevenoaks and 22.5 miles (36.2 km) from London.

Kent County of England

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west. The county also shares borders with Essex along the estuary of the River Thames, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais through the Channel Tunnel. The county town is Maidstone.

Tonbridge Market town in Kent, England

Tonbridge is a market town in Kent, England, on the River Medway, 4 miles (6 km) north of Royal Tunbridge Wells, 12 miles (19 km) south west of Maidstone and 29 miles (47 km) south east of London. In the administrative borough of Tonbridge and Malling, it had a population of 40,356 in 2015.

Bury was also known for his engravings and lithography, notably of the works of Augustus Welby Pugin and Owen Jones. He exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1846 and 1872, and was noted for the sketches he produced for Ackermann's series of lithographs and aquatints of the "Coloured Views of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway", in 1831, republished in 1976.

Owen Jones (architect) Welsh architect

Owen Jones was an English-born Welsh architect. A versatile architect and designer, he was also one of the most influential design theorists of the nineteenth century. He helped pioneer modern colour theory, and his theories on flat patterning and ornament still resonate with contemporary designers today.

Rudolph Ackermann German-born British publisher

Rudolph Ackermann was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman.

Bury was made a Fellow of the RIBA in 1843 and was elected vice-president in 1876. He was also a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, a council member of the Royal Archaeological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland and an associate of the Society of Civil Engineers.

Royal Institute of British Architects professional body for architects primarily in the United Kingdom

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects primarily in the United Kingdom, but also internationally, founded for the advancement of architecture under its charter granted in 1837 and Supplemental Charter granted in 1971.

Society of Antiquaries of London British learned society for archaeologists

The Society of Antiquaries of London (SAL) is a learned society "charged by its Royal Charter of 1751 with 'the encouragement, advancement and furtherance of the study and knowledge of the antiquities and history of this and other countries'." It is based at Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, and is a registered charity.

The Royal Archaeological Institute (RAI) is a learned society, established in 1844, with interests in all aspects of the archaeological, architectural and landscape history of the British Isles. Membership is open to all with an interest in these areas.

Bury died at his home in Cavendish Square, London and is buried at West Norwood Cemetery.

West Norwood Cemetery cemetery in West Norwood in London, England

West Norwood Cemetery is a 40-acre (16 ha) rural cemetery in West Norwood in London, England. It was also known as the South Metropolitan Cemetery. One of the first private landscaped cemeteries in London, it is one of the "Magnificent Seven" cemeteries of London, and is a site of major historical, architectural and ecological interest.

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References

  1. The Architectural History Practice Limited (February 2005). "Architectural History Report: New Lodge, Windsor" (PDF). Marchday Group Plc. p. 15. Retrieved December 26, 2011.
  2. 1 2 Homan, Roger (1984). The Victorian Churches of Kent. Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd. p. 106. ISBN   0-85033-466-7.
  3. Elleray, D. Robert (2004). Sussex Places of Worship. Worthing: Optimus Books. p. 14.