Thomas Taylour, 1st Earl of Bective

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The Earl of Bective

KP, PC
Thomas Taylour, 1st earl of Bective, by Gilbert Stuart and studio.jpg
Portrait of The Earl of Bective, by Gilbert Stuart and studio.
Member of Parliament for Kells
In office
1747–1760
Preceded by Sir Thomas Taylor, 2nd Bt
James Taylor
Succeeded by Richard Moore
Thomas Pepper
Personal details
Born
Thomas Taylour

20 October 1724 (1724-10-20)
Died14 February 1795 (1795-02-15) (aged 70)
Spouse(s)
Hon. Jane Rowley
(m. 1754;his death 1795)
Relations Thomas Edward Taylor (grandson)
Sir Richard Taylor (grandson
Sir Thomas Taylor, 1st Baronet (grandfather)
Children10
Parents Sir Thomas Taylor, 2nd Baronet
Sarah Graham
Alma mater Trinity College, Dublin

Thomas Taylour, 1st Earl of Bective, KP, PC (Ire) (20 October 1724 – 14 February 1795) [1] was an Irish peer and politician.

Contents

Early life

He was the oldest son of the former Sarah Graham and Sir Thomas Taylor, 2nd Baronet, a Member of the Parliament of England (MP) for Maidstone from 1689 to 1696. [2] His sister, Henrietta Taylor, was the wife of Richard Moore. [3]

His paternal grandparents were the former Anne Cotton (a daughter of Sir Robert Cotton, 1st Baronet, of Combermere) and Sir Thomas Taylor, 1st Baronet (a son of Thomas Taylor, who settled in Ireland from Sussex following the Cromwellian conquest of Ireland in 1652). His maternal grandfather was John Graham. [4] In 1757, Bective succeeded his father as baronet. [4]

He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin. [5]

Career

Bective entered the Irish House of Commons in 1747 and sat as Member of Parliament (MP) for Kells until 1760, [6] when he was elevated to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Headfort, of Headfort, in the County of Meath. [7] He was further honoured in 1762, he was made Viscount Headfort, of Headfort, in the County of Meath in 1762, [8] and on 24 October 1766, he was advanced to the dignity of Earl of Bective, of Bective Castle, in the County of Meath. [9]

In 1783, Bective became a founding member of the Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick [10] and in 1785 he was sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland. [11]

Personal life

On 4 July 1754, he married Hon. Jane Rowley, daughter of Rt. Hon. Hercules Langford Rowley and his wife Elizabeth Rowley, 1st Viscountess Langford. [12] Her brother, Hercules Rowley, 2nd Viscount Langford, represented County Antrim and Downpatrick in the Irish Parliament. [13] Together, they had four daughters and six sons, including: [3]

Lord Bective died, aged 70, on 14 February 1795 and was succeeded in his titles by his oldest son Thomas. [4] The widowed Countess of Bective died on 25 June 1818. [15]

Descendants

Through his daughter Lady Henrietta, he was a grandfather of four, including Catherine Jane Ponsonby-Barker (who married Edward Michael Conolly MP). [18]

Through his son, the Rev. Henry, he was a grandfather of Thomas Edward Taylor, MP and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, and General Sir Richard Chambré Hayes Taylor (1819–1904), who enjoyed a long and distinguished career in the army. [19]

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References

  1. "Leigh Rayment - Peerage" . Retrieved 5 May 2009.
  2. "TAYLOR, Sir Thomas, 2nd Bt. (1657-96), of Park House, Maidstone and Shadoxhurst, Kent". www.historyofparliamentonline.org. History of Parliament Online . Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  3. 1 2 Lodge, John (1789). Mervyn Archdall (ed.). The Peerage of Ireland or A Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom. vol. III. Dublin: James Moore. p. 176.
  4. 1 2 3 Lodge, Edmund (1838). The Genealogy of the Existing British Peerage (6th ed.). London: Saunder and Otley. pp.  243.
  5. "ThePeerage - Thomas Taylour, 1st Earl of Bective" . Retrieved 21 February 2007.
  6. 1 2 "Leigh Rayment - Irish House of Commons 1692-1800".
  7. "No. 10029". The London Gazette . 23 August 1760. p. 1.
  8. "No. 10194". The London Gazette . 23 March 1762. p. 2.
  9. "No. 10671". The London Gazette . 25 October 1766. p. 2.
  10. "Leigh Rayment - Knights of St Patrick" . Retrieved 5 May 2009.
  11. "Leigh Rayment - Privy Council of Ireland" . Retrieved 5 May 2009.
  12. Debrett, John (1828). Debrett's Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. vol. II (17th ed.). London: G. Woodfall. p. 629.
  13. Dod's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, of Great Britain and Ireland, for ...: Including All the Titled Classes. S. Low, Marston & Company. 1923. p. 419. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  14. "Headfort, Marquess of (I, 1800)". www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk. Heraldic Media Limited. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  15. 1 2 3 4 5 "Bective, Earl of (I, 1766)". www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk. Heraldic Media Limited. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  16. Burke, John (1832). A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage of the British Empire. vol. I (4th ed.). London: Henry Colburn and Richard Bentley. p. 597.
  17. "Langford, Baron (I, 1800)". www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk. Heraldic Media Limited. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  18. Lodge, Edmund (1848). The Peerage of the British Empire to which is added the Baronetage. Saunders and Otley. p. 347. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
  19. "Tweeddale, Marquess of (S, 1694)". www.cracroftspeerage.co.uk. Heraldic Media Limited. Retrieved 30 April 2020.
Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Taylor, 2nd Bt
James Taylor
Member of Parliament for Kells
1747–1760
With: Sir Thomas Taylor, 2nd Bt 1747–1757
Richard Moore 1757–1760
Succeeded by
Richard Moore
Thomas Pepper
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Earl of Bective
1766–1795
Succeeded by
Thomas Taylour
Viscount Headfort
1762–1795
Baron Headfort
1760–1795
Baronetage of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Taylor
Baronet
(of Kells)
1757–1795
Succeeded by
Thomas Taylour