Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort

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The Marquess of Headfort

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Pompeo Batoni - Thomas Tayleur, First Marquess of Headfort - Google Art Project.jpg
Portrait by Pompeo Batoni of Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort (1782), Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Personal details
Spouse(s)Mary Quin
Parents Thomas Taylour, 1st Earl of Bective
Jane Rowley
Portrait by Pompeo Batoni of Taylour's wife, Mary Quin, and newborn daughter Mary (1782), Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Pompeo Batoni - The Marchioness of Headfort Holding Her Daughter Mary - Google Art Project.jpg
Portrait by Pompeo Batoni of Taylour's wife, Mary Quin, and newborn daughter Mary (1782), Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort KP (18 November 1757 – 24 October 1829), styled Viscount Headford from 1766 to 1795, and known as The Earl of Bective from 1795 to 1800, was an Irish peer and politician.

Order of St Patrick Dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland

The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is a dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland. The Order was created in 1783 by George III at the request of the then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, The 3rd Earl Temple. The regular creation of knights of Saint Patrick lasted until 1922, when most of Ireland gained independence as the Irish Free State, a dominion within what was then known as the British Commonwealth of Nations. While the Order technically still exists, no knight of St Patrick has been created since 1936, and the last surviving knight, Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, died in 1974. The Queen, however, remains the Sovereign of the Order, and one officer, the Ulster King of Arms, also survives. St Patrick is patron of the order; its motto is Quis separabit?, Latin for "Who will separate [us]?": an allusion to the Vulgate translation of Romans 8:35, "Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?"

Contents

Early life and family

He was the son of Thomas Taylour, 1st Earl of Bective, whom he succeeded in 1795. The 1st Marquess of Headfort was married to Mary Quin, the daughter of George Quin and Caroline Cavendish and the granddaughter of Valentine Quin and Mary Widenham. Valentine Quin was the son of the 1st Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl (1752–1824), who was also 1st Viscount Mount-Earl, [1] and whose son Lord George Quin married Lady Georgiana Charlotte, the daughter of George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer.

Thomas Taylour, 1st Earl of Bective Irish politician

Thomas Taylour, 1st Earl of Bective KP, PC (Ire) was an Irish peer and politician.

George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer British Earl

George John Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer,, styled Viscount Althorp from 1765 to 1783, was a British Whig politician. He notably served as Home Secretary from 1806 to 1807 in the Ministry of All the Talents. He was the 3rd paternal great grandfather of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Headfort's elopement in 1803 with the wife of Reverend C. D. Massey produced a lawsuit, 10,000 pounds damages and, for the plaintiff, one of John Philpot Curran's most famous speeches. [2]

Career

Taylour represented Kells in the Irish House of Commons from 1776 to 1790. Subsequently he sat as Member of Parliament for Longford Borough until 1794 and then for Meath until 1795, when he succeeded his father as earl. He became Marquess of Headfort in 1800 and was appointed a Knight of the Order of St Patrick on 15 May 1806. [3]

Kells was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800.

Irish House of Commons lower house of the irish parliament (until 1800)

The Irish House of Commons was the lower house of the Parliament of Ireland that existed from 1297 until 1800. The upper house was the House of Lords. The membership of the House of Commons was directly elected, but on a highly restrictive franchise, similar to the Unreformed House of Commons in contemporary England and Great Britain. In counties, forty-shilling freeholders were enfranchised whilst in most boroughs it was either only the members of self-electing corporations or a highly-restricted body of freemen that were able to vote for the borough's representatives. Most notably, Catholics were disqualified from sitting in the Irish parliament from 1691, even though they comprised the vast majority of the Irish population. From 1728 until 1793 they were also disfranchised. Most of the population of all religions had no vote. The vast majority of parliamentary boroughs were pocket boroughs, the private property of an aristocratic patron. When these boroughs were disfranchised under the Act of Union, the patron was awarded £15,000 compensation for each.

Longford Borough was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800.

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References

  1. Charles Mosley, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 1237.
  2. The Complete Peerage, Volume VI, page 427, note (a).
  3. Rayment, Leigh. "Knights of the Order of St Patrick" . Retrieved 2008-12-13.
Parliament of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Pepper
Thomas Moore
Member of Parliament for Kells
1776–1790
With: Thomas Moore 1776–1781
Hon. Hercules Taylour 1781–1790
Succeeded by
Hon. Hercules Taylour
Hon. Thomas Pakenham
Preceded by
Hon. Thomas Pakenham
Henry Stewart
Member of Parliament for Longford Borough
1790–1794
With: Hon. Hercules Rowley 1790–1791
Henry Stewart 1791–1794
Succeeded by
Thomas Pepper
Henry Stewart
Preceded by
Hercules Langford Rowley
Hamilton Gorges
Member of Parliament for Meath
1794–1795
With: Hamilton Gorges
Succeeded by
Hon. Clotworthy Taylor
Hamilton Gorges
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Marquess of Headfort
1800–1829
Succeeded by
Thomas Taylour
Preceded by
Thomas Taylour
Earl of Bective
1795–1829