Thomas Taylour, 2nd Marquess of Headfort

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Thomas Taylour, 2nd Marquess of Headfort KP PC (4 May 1787 – 6 December 1870), styled Viscount Headfort from 1795 to 1800 and Earl of Bective from 1800 to 1829, was an Anglo-Irish Whig politician. He was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Meath from 1812 to 1830.

The Privy Council of Ireland was an institution of the Kingdom of Ireland until 31 December 1800 and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. It performed a similar role in the Dublin Castle administration in Ireland to that of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in the government of the United Kingdom.

Meath was a parliamentary constituency in Ireland, which from 1801 to 1885 returned two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Headfort was the son of Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort, and his wife Mary (née Quin), and succeeded his father in the marquessate in 1829. In 1831 he was created Baron Kenlis, of Kenlis in the County of Meath, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, which entitled him to an automatic seat in the House of Lords (his other titles being in the Peerage of Ireland). He was sworn of the Irish Privy Council in 1835 and served in the Whig administration of Lord Melbourne as a Lord-in-waiting (government whip in the House of Lords) from 1837 to 1841. Between 1831 and 1870 Headfort also held the post of Lord Lieutenant of Cavan. He was made a Knight of the Order of St Patrick in 1839.

Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort Irish politician

Thomas Taylour, 1st Marquess of Headfort, styled Viscount Headford from 1766 to 1795, and known as The Earl of Bective from 1795 to 1800, was an Irish peer and politician.

The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain. New peers continued to be created in the Peerage of Ireland until 1898.

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Lord Headfort first married Olivia, daughter of John Andrew Stevenson, in 1822. After her death (sometime between 1841-1853) he married, in 1853, Frances, daughter of John Livingstone Martyn and widow of (i) Lieutenant-Colonel James McClintock of the Bombay Army and (ii) Sir William Hay Macnaghten, British Envoy to Afghanistan who was murdered in Kabul in 1841. Headfort died in December 1870, aged 83, and was succeeded in the marquessate by his son from his first marriage, Thomas. The Marchioness of Headfort died in 1878.

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Thomas Taylour, 3rd Marquess of Headfort British politician

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References

Honorary titles
New title Lord-Lieutenant of County Cavan
18311870
Succeeded by
The Lord Lisgar
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Taylour
Marquess of Headfort
18291870
Succeeded by
Thomas Taylour
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baron Kenlis
18311870
Succeeded by
Thomas Taylour