Thomas Taylour, 3rd Marquess of Headfort

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"An Irish Property". Caricature by Spy published in Vanity Fair in 1877. Thomas Taylour, Vanity Fair, 1877-03-31.jpg
"An Irish Property". Caricature by Spy published in Vanity Fair in 1877.

Thomas Taylour, 3rd Marquess of Headfort KP PC (I) (1 November 1822 22 July 1894) was an Irish peer, styled Lord Kenlis until 1829 and Earl of Bective from 1829 to 1870.

Order of St Patrick Dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland

The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is a dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland. The Order was created in 1783 by George III at the request of the then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, The 3rd Earl Temple. The regular creation of knights of Saint Patrick lasted until 1922, when most of Ireland gained independence as the Irish Free State, a dominion within what was then known as the British Commonwealth of Nations. While the Order technically still exists, no knight of St Patrick has been created since 1936, and the last surviving knight, Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, died in 1974. The Queen, however, remains the Sovereign of the Order, and one officer, the Ulster King of Arms, also survives. St Patrick is patron of the order; its motto is Quis separabit?, Latin for "Who will separate [us]?": an allusion to the Vulgate translation of Romans 8:35, "Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?"

The Privy Council of Ireland was an institution of the Kingdom of Ireland until 31 December 1800 and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. It performed a similar role in the Dublin Castle administration in Ireland to that of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in the government of the United Kingdom.

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He was High Sheriff of Meath in 1844, of Cavan in 1846, and of Westmorland in 1853. From 1852 to 1853, he was State Steward to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. In 1854, Bective succeeded his father-in-law as Member of Parliament for Westmorland, sitting as a Conservative.

The High Sheriff of Meath was the British Crown's judicial representative in County Meath, Ireland from the conquest until 1922, when the office was abolished in the new Free State and replaced by the office of Meath County Sheriff.

The High Sheriff of Cavan was the British Crown's judicial representative in County Cavan, Ireland from the 16th century until 1922, when the office was abolished in the new Free State and replaced by the office of Cavan County Sheriff. The sheriff had judicial, electoral, ceremonial and administrative functions and executed High Court Writs. In 1908, an Order in Council made the Lord-Lieutenant the Sovereign's prime representative in a county and reduced the High Sheriff's precedence. However the sheriff retained his responsibilities for the preservation of law and order in the county. The usual procedure for appointing the sheriff from 1660 onwards was that three persons were nominated at the beginning of each year from the county and the Lord Lieutenant then appointed his choice as High Sheriff for the remainder of the year. Often the other nominees were appointed as under-sheriffs. Sometimes a sheriff did not fulfil his entire term through death or other event and another sheriff was then appointed for the remainder of the year. The dates given hereunder are the dates of appointment. All addresses are in County Cavan unless stated otherwise.

Westmorland in North West England no longer exists as a county, the original core of it having merged into the modern district of Eden within the county of Cumbria.

He succeeded his father as Marquess of Headfort in 1870. He also inherited his father's title of Baron Kenlis, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, and so gained a seat in the House of Lords; his son Thomas replaced him in the House of Commons for Westmorland.

The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain. New peers continued to be created in the Peerage of Ireland until 1898.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

He was an Irish Freemason, having been initiated in Lodge No 244 (Kells, Ireland), and served as the Provincial Grand Master of Meath from 1888 until his death and burial at Virginia, County Cavan in 1894. [1] He was also an English Freemason and belonged to a number of Masonic Orders. In particular, he served as Grand Sovereign (the Head of the Order) of the Masonic and Military Order of the Red Cross of Constantine from 1866 until 1874. [2]

Virginia, County Cavan Town in Ulster, Ireland

Virginia is the second largest town in County Cavan, Ireland. Founded in the 17th century as a plantation town, it now holds both local industry and commuter housing.

Red Cross of Constantine

The Red Cross of Constantine, or more formally the Masonic and Military Order of the Red Cross of Constantine and the Appendant Orders of the Holy Sepulchre and of St John the Evangelist, is a Christian fraternal order of Freemasonry. Candidates for the order must already be members of Craft Freemasonry (lodge) and Royal Arch Freemasonry (chapter); they must also be members of the Christian religion, and ready to proclaim their belief in the Christian doctrine of the Holy Trinity.

Family

On 20 July 1842, he married Amelia Thompson, daughter of William Thompson. They had seven children:

Thomas Taylour, Earl of Bective, styled Lord Kenlis until 1870, was an Anglo-Irish Conservative politician.

John Crichton, 3rd Earl Erne, KP, was an Anglo-Irish peer and politician.

Somerset Henry Maxwell, 10th Baron Farnham was an Irish Representative peer and a Nova Scotia baronet.

His wife Amelia died on 4 December 1864. On 29 November 1875, he married again, to Emily Constantia Thynne, daughter of Rev. Lord John Thynne and granddaughter of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Marquess of Bath. They had two children:

His eldest son Thomas died in 1894, a few months before his father, and so the marquessate passed to Geoffrey, Headfort's only son by his second marriage.

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References

  1. See 'A brief history of the Provincial Grand Lodge of Meath', at the official website of that organisation.
  2. Report of Proceedings of the Grand Imperial Council, 2013. Published by Lewis Masonic (Ian Allan Publishing Ltd), 2013. ISBN   978 0 85318 435 5. Page 180.
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Henry Lowther
William Thompson
Member of Parliament for Westmorland
18541870
With: Henry Lowther 18541868
William Lowther 18681871
Succeeded by
William Lowther
Earl of Bective
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Marquess Conyngham
Lord Lieutenant of Meath
18761894
Succeeded by
Simon Mangan
Peerage of Ireland
Preceded by
Thomas Taylour
Marquess of Headfort
18701894
Succeeded by
Geoffrey Taylour
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Thomas Taylour
Baron Kenlis
18701894
Succeeded by
Geoffrey Taylour