Thomas Thistle

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Thomas Thistle (22 November 1853, in Toxteth Park, Liverpool, Lancashire, England 7 February 1936, in Eling vicarage, Southampton Hampshire) was an Anglican priest in England, New Zealand and Australia. He became headmaster of Hereford Cathedral School, [1] a medieval foundation.

Toxteth district of Liverpool, Merseyside, England

Toxteth is an inner city area of Liverpool, England. Historically in Lancashire, now in Merseyside. Toxteth is located to the south of the city centre; Toxteth is bordered by Liverpool City Centre, Edge Hill, The Dingle and Aigburth.

Liverpool City and Metropolitan borough in England

Liverpool is a city in North West England, with an estimated population of 491,500 in 2017. Its metropolitan area is the fifth-largest in the UK, with a population of 2.24 million in 2011. The local authority is Liverpool City Council, the most populous local government district in the metropolitan county of Merseyside and the largest in the Liverpool City Region.

Lancashire County of England

Lancashire is a ceremonial county in North West England. The administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians.

Contents

Family background

Thomas Thistle was the son of Thomas Thistle, a wool draper and gentleman of Liverpool (born 1813 Ugglebarnby, Yorkshire died 1892) and Alice Smith (born c. 1817 Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire died 1893). This Thomas Thistle had a brother, Michael Thistle who drowned in the Neptune in about 1838.

Yorkshire historic county of Northern England

Yorkshire, formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England and the largest in the United Kingdom. Due to its great size in comparison to other English counties, functions have been undertaken over time by its subdivisions, which have also been subject to periodic reform. Throughout these changes, Yorkshire has continued to be recognised as a geographical territory and cultural region. The name is familiar and well understood across the United Kingdom and is in common use in the media and the military, and also features in the titles of current areas of civil administration such as North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire and East Riding of Yorkshire.

Whitby Coastal town in North Yorkshire, England

Whitby is a seaside town, port and civil parish in the Scarborough borough of North Yorkshire, England. Situated on the east coast of Yorkshire at the mouth of the River Esk, Whitby has a maritime, mineral and tourist heritage. Its East Cliff is home to the ruins of Whitby Abbey, where Cædmon, the earliest recognised English poet, lived. The fishing port emerged during the Middle Ages, supporting important herring and whaling fleets, and was where Captain Cook learned seamanship. Tourism started in Whitby during the Georgian period and developed with the arrival of the railway in 1839. Its attraction as a tourist destination is enhanced by the proximity of the high ground of the North York Moors national park and the heritage coastline and by association with the horror novel Dracula. Jet and alum were mined locally, and Whitby Jet, which was mined by the Romans and Victorians, became fashionable during the 19th century.

North Riding of Yorkshire

The North Riding of Yorkshire is one of the three historic subdivisions (ridings) of the English county of Yorkshire, alongside the East and West ridings. From the Restoration it was used as a lieutenancy area, having been part of the Yorkshire lieutenancy previously. The three ridings were treated as three counties for many purposes, such as having separate quarter sessions. An administrative county was created with a county council in 1889 under the Local Government Act 1888 on the historic boundaries. In 1974 both the administrative county and the Lieutenancy of the North Riding of Yorkshire were abolished, being succeeded in most of the riding by the new non-metropolitan county of North Yorkshire.

Hannah Elizabeth Vowles nee Thistle (1842-1903). Sister of the Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936). She married Reverend Henry Hayes Vowles (1843-1905) HannahElizabethVowlesneeThistle(1842-1903)wifeofRevHenryHayesVowles.jpg
Hannah Elizabeth Vowles née Thistle (1842-1903). Sister of the Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936). She married Reverend Henry Hayes Vowles (1843-1905)

His younger brother William George Thistle (1856–1901) was a medical doctor. A description of him stated that: "William George MRCS LRCP was a most engaging scamp of dissolute habits, an amusing raconteur and bonviveur generally. He made a disastrous marriage and died without issue" [2]

Family tree of Thistle family of Whitby, including Hugh Pembroke Vowles, Reverend Thomas Thistle MA of Hereford (1853-1936) and his sister Hannah Elizabeth Thistle (1842-1903), Richard Chapman of Foss Hill, Ugglebarnby, John Chapman of Hobin head, Elizabeth Marsingale (b1630) and Nicholas Chapman (d1551) of Hempsyke, Ugglebarnby. Yorkshire, England ThistlefamilyofWhitbyEnglandtree.jpg
Family tree of Thistle family of Whitby, including Hugh Pembroke Vowles, Reverend Thomas Thistle MA of Hereford (1853-1936) and his sister Hannah Elizabeth Thistle (1842-1903), Richard Chapman of Foss Hill, Ugglebarnby, John Chapman of Hobin head, Elizabeth Marsingale (b1630) and Nicholas Chapman (d1551) of Hempsyke, Ugglebarnby. Yorkshire, England

His grandmother Martha Thistle (née Wilson 1779 – 1848) was the younger sister of Jane Robinson murdered at Eskdaleside in 1841.

Eskdaleside cum Ugglebarnby

Eskdaleside cum Ugglebarnby is a civil parish in the Scarborough district of North Yorkshire, England, comprising the two villages of Sleights and Ugglebarnby.

George Smith. Father of Alice Smith (born c. 1817 Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire died 1893) who was, in turn, the mother of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles nee Thistle (1842-1903) GeorgeSmith(fatherofAliceThistleneeSmith,motherofRevThomasThistle(1853-1936)andHannahElizabethVowlesneeThistle(1842-1903).jpg
George Smith. Father of Alice Smith (born c. 1817 Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire died 1893) who was, in turn, the mother of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles née Thistle (1842-1903)

Education

He attended Durham School from 1866 to 1873 and in 1873 matriculated aged 19 at Corpus Christi College, Oxford University. In 1877, he was awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree and in 1881 a Master of Arts both from Oxford.

Durham School Independent school in Durham, England

Durham School is an English independent boarding school for pupils aged between 3 and 18 years. Founded by the Bishop of Durham, Thomas Langley, in 1414, it received royal foundation by King Henry VIII in 1541 following the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the Protestant Reformation. It is the city's oldest institution of learning.

Corpus Christi College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Corpus Christi College, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1517, it is the 12th oldest college in Oxford, with a financial endowment of £139 million as of 2017.

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Later life

In 1878, he was made a deacon and in 1879 a priest, both in London. From 1878 to 1882, he worked as a curate at Holy Trinity Marylebone within the Diocese of London. In 1881, he was unmarried and living at Great Portland Street, Marylebone.

Deacon ministry in the Christian Church

A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. Some Christian churches, such as the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Anglican church, view the diaconate as part of the clerical state; in others, the deacon remains a layperson.

Priest person authorized to lead the sacred rituals of a religion (for a minister use Q1423891)

A priest is a religious leader authorized to perform the sacred rituals of a religion, especially as a mediatory agent between humans and one or more deities. They also have the authority or power to administer religious rites; in particular, rites of sacrifice to, and propitiation of, a deity or deities. Their office or position is the priesthood, a term which also may apply to such persons collectively.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

In 1883, Thistle arrived at Waihora, Auckland, New Zealand. From 1883 to 1884, he worked as an assistant master at Auckland College. In 1884, he was an examiner at the University of New Zealand. In 1885, he received his general licence in the diocese of Tasmania, Australia. From 1885 to 1886, he was warden at Christ Church College, Hobart Tasmania. On 30 November 1886 he received his letters testimonial from the bishop of Tasmania. He subsequently returned to England and from 1887 to 1890, worked as assistant to the headmaster of Ripon Grammar School. From 1890 to 1897, he was headmaster at Hereford Cathedral school. In 1891 with wife residing Hereford St John. From 1897 until his death he was vicar of Eling, Southampton within the Diocese of Winchester.

Thomas Thistle (born 1813 Ugglebarnby Yorkshire, died 1892). Father of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles nee Thistle (1842-1903) ThomasThistle(born1813UgglebarnbyInYorkshiredied1892)FatherofRevThomasThistle(1853 -1936)andHannahElizabethVowlesneeThistle(1842-1903).jpg
Thomas Thistle (born 1813 Ugglebarnby Yorkshire, died 1892). Father of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles née Thistle (1842-1903)

The Thistle Chapel, Eling

Eling parish church is the tenth oldest church in England, dating back to 850. The church contains a "Thistle chapel", furnished in memory of Thomas Thistle. [3]

Photograph of Alice Smith (born c. 1817 Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire died 1893). Mother of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles nee Thistle (1842-1903) AliceThistle(neeSmith)motherofHannahElizabethVowles(neeThistle).jpg
Photograph of Alice Smith (born c. 1817 Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire died 1893). Mother of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles née Thistle (1842-1903)

Publications

The Offices of St Wilfrid affording to the use of the church of Ripon: from A Psalter belonging to the Dean and Chapter of Ripon Cathedral, with an English translation (1893) by John Whitham (Chapter clerk of Ripon Cathedral and a Life member of the Yorkshire Archeological Society) assisted by Rev. Thomas thistle, M.A. (late assistant head master of the Ripon Grammar School and now head master of the Hereford Grammar school)

Photograph of Alice Smith (born c. 1817 Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire died 1893). Mother of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles nee Thistle (1842-1903) AliceThistle(neeSmith)motherofHannahElizabethVowles(neeThistle)2.jpg
Photograph of Alice Smith (born c. 1817 Whitby, North Riding of Yorkshire died 1893). Mother of Rev Thomas Thistle (1853 -1936) and Hannah Elizabeth Vowles née Thistle (1842-1903)

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References

  1. http://www.kinderlibrary.ac.nz/Files/Clergy%20Tagalad%20to%20Tye.htm
  2. Thistle Family by H. Robinson published privately 1957
  3. http://www.southernlife.org.uk/elingchu.htm