Thomas Thrower

Last updated

Thomas Henry Thrower (28 June 1870 21 June 1917) was an Australian politician. He was an Australian Labor Party member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1904 to 1907 and 1910 to 1917, representing the electorate of Macquarie.

Contents

Early life and career

Thrower was born in Surry Hills in Sydney and was raised in the Shoalhaven district on the South Coast before returning to Sydney to attend high school. He intended to study law, but due to his family's financial situation instead apprenticed as a furniture and cabinet maker. He joined the Furniture Trades Union, and served as its president for several years. In 1888, while still an apprentice, he was elected as a delegate to the Trades and Labour Council of Sydney and served on its executive and parliamentary committees through the 1890 maritime strike and the 1892 Broken Hill strike. In 1900, when the council reformed as the Sydney Labour Council, he was elected as its president and served until 1902, when the council decided to establish a paid secretary role and appointed Thrower to the position; in this capacity, he represented 77 unions and over 45,000 workers. As a unionist, he was an outspoken opponent of Chinese labour and business, especially in the cabinetmaking and grocery businesses. In 1902, he represented the New South Wales unions at the first Commonwealth Trade Union Congress. He was also a member of the Citizen's Relief (Lord Mayor's) Fund Committee, the union representative on the Commonwealth Celebrations Committee and a long-standing secretary of the Eight Hour Day committee. He was an unsuccessful Labor candidate at the 1903 Tamworth state by-election and the 1903 federal election in East Sydney. [1] [2] [3]

State politics

He was elected to the Legislative Assembly at the 1904 state election for Macquarie, at which time he resigned as Labour Council secretary. [1] However, he was defeated by 65 votes at the 1907 election by Liberal candidate Charles Barton. [4] He then served as secretary of the Dubbo and Gilgandra-based Western Timber Getters Association and its successor the Western Timber Cutters and Carters Association from 1907 to 1910. [5] [6] [7]

Thrower won his old seat back at the 1910 state election at which Barton retired, and was narrowly re-elected in the marginal seat in 1913 and 1917. He was chairman of committees from March 1914 to February 1917 and was well-regarded in the role, as of result of which he had been touted as a potential future Speaker. As the local MP, he was largely responsible for the substantial extension of the Dubbo Hospital, improvements to the Dubbo Public School and the establishment of the Dubbo High School and was a strong advocate for the construction of the Molong–Dubbo railway line. He became ill in September 1916 with what was described as Bright's disease, spending long periods in hospital and physically struggling during the 1917 election campaign. He died at Redfern in June 1917 aged only 47, only three months after his re-election. He was buried in the Roman Catholic section of the Waverley Cemetery. [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14]

He married Catherine Newman around 1900, and they had five children. [5]

Related Research Articles

Joseph Cahill

John Joseph Cahill, also known as Joe Cahill or J. J. Cahill, was a long-serving New South Wales politician, railway worker, trade unionist and Labor Party Premier of New South Wales from 1952 to his death in 1959. Born the son of Irish migrants in Redfern, New South Wales, Cahill worked for the New South Wales Government Railways from the age of 16 before joining the Australian Labor Party. Being a prominent unionist organiser, including being dismissed for his role in the 1917 general strike, Cahill was eventually elected to the Parliament of New South Wales for St George in 1925.

Ernest Carr

Ernest "Ernie" Shoebridge Carr was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1906 until 1917 for the electorate of Macquarie, representing the Australian Labor Party until the 1916 Labor split and thereafter joining the new Nationalist Party. He was later a Nationalist member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1920 to 1922, representing the electorate of Cumberland.

David Watkins (Australian politician)

David Watkins was an Australian politician. He was an Australian Labor Party member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for Wallsend from 1894 until 1901. At Federation, he was elected to the new Australian House of Representatives as the Labor member for Newcastle and served until his death in 1935. Watkins' death left former Prime Minister Billy Hughes as the only remaining member of the First Parliament still in the House.

Sir Colin Archibald Sinclair was an Australian politician.

Reginald Weaver

Reginald Walter Darcy Weaver was an Australian conservative parliamentarian who served in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly for 28 years. Serving from 1917 in the backbenches, he entered the cabinet of Thomas Bavin in 1929 as Secretary for Mines and Minister for Forests until he returned to opposition in 1930. Following the success of the United Australia Party in the 1932 election, Weaver returned as the Secretary for Public Works and Minister for Health in the Stevens ministry.

Macquarie, until 1910 The Macquarie was an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, created in 1894 and named after the Macquarie River. It was re-created in 1904, retaining nothing but the name, then abolished in 1920.

William Patrick Crick was an Australian politician, solicitor and newspaper proprietor. He was described by author Cyril Pearl as an irresistible demagogue, who "looked like a prize fighter, dressed like a tramp, talked like a bullocky, and to complete the pattern of popular virtues, owned champion horses which he backed heavily and recklessly."

Eric Spooner

Eric Sydney Spooner was an Australian politician.

David Oliver Watkins

David Oliver Watkins was an Australian politician. He was an Australian Labor Party member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1935 until 1958, representing the electorate of Newcastle.

Joe Gander

Joseph Herbert Gander was an Australian politician. He was a member of the Australian House of Representatives from 1931 to 1940, representing the Sydney-based seat of Reid for the first Lang Labor (1931–1936), the Australian Labor Party (1936–1940) and the second Lang Labor (1940).

Thomas Vernon Ryan was an Australian politician. He was a Labor Party member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly from 1956 to 1965, representing the electorate of Auburn.

Albert Charles Willis was an Australian politician.

Patrick Joseph Minahan, was an Irish-born Australian politician.

Patrick Michael McGirr was an Australian politician.

Richard Alfred O'Connor was an Australian politician. He was a Liberal Union member of the South Australian House of Assembly from 1915 to 1921, representing the multi-member seat of Albert.

Darling Harbour, an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales was created in 1904 and abolished in 1913.

The 1904 New South Wales state election involved 90 electoral districts returning one member each. The election was conducted on the basis of a simple majority or first-past-the-post voting system. There were two significant changes from the 1901 election, the first was that women were given the right to vote, which saw an increase in the number of enrolled voters from 345,500 in 1901, to 689,490 in 1904. The second was that as a result of the 1903 New South Wales referendum, the number of members of the Legislative Assembly was reduced from 125 to 90. The combined effect of the changes meant that the average number of enrolled voters per electorate went from 2,764, to 7,661, an increase of 277%. Leichhardt was the only district that was not substantially changed, while The Macquarie and The Murray districts retained nothing but the name.

The 1917 Macquarie state by-election was held for the New South Wales state electoral district of Macquarie on 28 July 1917. The by-election was triggered by the death of Australian Labor Party MP Thomas Thrower, who had died only three months after being re-elected at the 1917 state election.

Macquarie, until 1910 The Macquarie, an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of New South Wales, was created in 1894, re-created in 1904, retaining nothing but the name, then abolished in 1920.

References

  1. 1 2 "Mr. T. H. Thrower, M.L.A. for Macquarie". Wellington Times . 18 August 1904. p. 6. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  2. "Secretary of the Congress". The Daily Telegraph . 26 November 1902. p. 9. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  3. "Death of Mr T. H. Thrower, M.L.A." The Daily Telegraph . 22 June 1917. p. 5. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  4. Green, Antony. "1907 The Macquarie (Roll: 9,231)". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 17 July 2020.
  5. 1 2 "Mr Thomas Henry Thrower (1870-1917)". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 8 May 2019.
  6. "Local and district brevities". Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent . 28 November 1908. p. 5. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  7. "Western Timber Cutters' Association". The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate . 7 April 1909. p. 2. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  8. Green, Antony. "Elections for the District of Macquarie". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 21 December 2019.
  9. "Summary". Western Age . New South Wales, Australia. 15 May 1917. p. 2. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  10. "Vale!". Dubbo Dispatch and Wellington Independent . 22 June 1917. p. 1. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  11. "Summary". The Daily Telegraph . 22 June 1917. p. 1. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  12. "Death of MR. T. H. Thrower, M.L.A." The Daily Telegraph . 22 June 1917. p. 5. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  13. "Death of Mr. T. H. Thrower, M.L.A". The Dubbo Liberal and Macquarie Advocate . 22 June 1917. p. 2. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.
  14. "Representative funeral". The Sun . 24 June 1917. p. 2. Retrieved 21 December 2019 via Trove.

 

New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
William Hurley
Member for Macquarie
19041907
Succeeded by
Charles Barton
Preceded by
Charles Barton
Member for Macquarie
19101917
Succeeded by
Patrick McGirr