Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth

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Arms of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth: Barry of ten or and sable (Botteville); 2nd and 3rd: Argent, a lion rampant tail nowed and erect gules (Thynne) Bath, marquess of.svg
Arms of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth: Barry of ten or and sable (Botteville); 2nd and 3rd: Argent, a lion rampant tail nowed and erect gules (Thynne)

Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth (21 May 1710 – 1751) of Longleat House in Wiltshire was an English peer, descended from Sir John Thynne (c.1515-1580) builder of Longleat.

John Thynne English Member of Parliament, died 1580

Sir John Thynne was the steward to Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset and a member of parliament. He was the builder of Longleat House and his descendants became Marquesses of Bath.

Contents

Origins

He was born on 21 May 1710, the son of Thomas Thynne (d.1710) by his wife Lady Mary Villiers. [1] His father died a month before the young Thomas was born.

Inheritance

Longleat House, which he inherited aged 4; painting by Jan Siberechts, 1675 Siberechts-ViewovLongleat.jpg
Longleat House, which he inherited aged 4; painting by Jan Siberechts, 1675

On 28 July 1714, aged four, on the death of his great uncle Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth, he inherited Longleat House and its great estates and succeeded to the Baronetcy of Thynne, of Kempsford, Gloucestershire, and (by special remainder) to the titles of Baron Thynne of Warminster, Wiltshire, and Viscount Weymouth, of Dorset. [1]

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth English politician and Viscount

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth was a British peer in the peerage of England.

Kempsford village in United Kingdom

Kempsford is a village and civil parish in Gloucestershire, England, about 2.5 miles (4 km) south of Fairford. RAF Fairford is located near the village. The population was around 1,120 at the 2011 census.

Gloucestershire County of England

Gloucestershire is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean.

Career

In 1733 he was appointed High Steward of Tamworth and was also Grand Master of the Premier Grand Lodge of England from 1735 to 1736. Between 4 December 1739 and 1751, he held the Royal offices of Keeper of Hyde Park, Keeper of the Mall, and Ranger of St. James's Park, [1] all in the City of Westminster. Shortly after his Hyde Park appointment, he began the construction of the Serpentine Lakes at Longleat, apparently in imitation of Hyde Park's Serpentine. [2]

Premier Grand Lodge of England

The organisation known as the Premier Grand Lodge of England was founded on 24 June 1717 as the 'Grand Lodge of London and Westminster'. Originally concerned with the practice of Freemasonry in London and Westminster, it soon became known as the Grand Lodge of England. Because it was the first Masonic Grand Lodge to be created, convention calls it the Premier Grand Lodge of England in order to distinguish it from the Most Ancient and Honourable Society of Free and Accepted Masons according to the Old Constitutions, more usually referred to as the Ancient Grand Lodge of England, and the Grand Lodge of All England Meeting at York. It existed until 1813, when it united with the Ancient Grand Lodge of England to create the United Grand Lodge of England.

Hyde Park, London Royal Park in London, United Kingdom

Hyde Park is a Grade I-listed major park in Central London. It is the largest of four Royal Parks that form a chain from the entrance of Kensington Palace through Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park, via Hyde Park Corner and Green Park past the main entrance to Buckingham Palace. The park is divided by the Serpentine and the Long Water lakes.

The Mall, London road in London, England

The Mall is a road in the City of Westminster, central London, between Buckingham Palace at its western end and Trafalgar Square via Admiralty Arch to the east. Near the east end at Trafalgar Square/Whitehall it is met by Horse Guards Road and Spring Gardens where the Metropolitan Board of Works and London County Council were once based. It is closed to traffic on Saturdays, Sundays, public holidays and on ceremonial occasions.

Marriages & issue

He married twice:

Elizabeth Thynne, Viscountess Weymouth, formerly Lady Elizabeth Sackville, was the wife of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth.

Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset British noble

Lionel Cranfield Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset was an English political leader and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

Arms of Carteret: Gules, four fusils in fess argent CarteretArms.png
Arms of Carteret: Gules, four fusils in fess argent

Louisa Thynne, Viscountess Weymouth, formerly Lady Louisa Carteret, was the second wife of Thomas Thynne, 2nd Viscount Weymouth. She was the daughter of John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, and his first wife, the former Frances Worsley.

John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath English Royalist soldier and politician

John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath PC, of Stowe in the parish of Kilkhampton in Cornwall, was an English Royalist soldier and statesman during the Civil War who played a major role in the 1660 Restoration of the Monarchy and was later appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He was the first in his family to adopt the modernised spelling as Granville of their ancient surname Grenville, which emphasised their supposed ancient 11th-century origin from the Normandy manor of Granville, Manche.

William Granville, 3rd Earl of Bath

William Henry Granville, 3rd Earl of Bath was an English nobleman.

Death & burial

He died on 12 January 1750/51, at Horningsham, Wiltshire, [1] and was buried there on 22 January.

Peerage of England
Preceded by
Thomas Thynne
Viscount Weymouth
1714–1751
Succeeded by
Thomas Thynne

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Burke's Peerage and Baronetage, (106th edition, 1999), vol. 1, p. 212
  2. Timothy Mowl, Rococo and Later Landscaping at Longleat (1995) p. 59
  3. Augusta Hall (baroness Llanover) (1861). The autobiography and correspondence of Mary Granville, mrs. Delany, ed. by lady Llanover. p. 583.
  4. The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, Volume 96, Part 2, August 1826, p.174, Obituary
  5. Victoria County History, Bedford, Volume 2, William Page (editor), 1908, pp.338-344, Parishes: Hawnes or Haynes
  6. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  7. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  8. 1 2 Wikisource-logo.svg  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1898). "Thynne, William"  . Dictionary of National Biography . 56. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
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