Thomas Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath

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The Marquess of Bath

Marquess of Bath Vanity Fair 1896-04-23.jpg
"Frome". Lord Bath as caricatured by Spy (Leslie Ward) in Vanity Fair, April 1896.
Under-Secretary of State for India
In office
20 January 1905 4 December 1905
Monarch Edward VII
Prime Minister Arthur Balfour
Preceded by Earl Percy
Succeeded by John Ellis
Master of the Horse
In office
20 November 1922 22 January 1924
Monarch George V
Prime Minister Bonar Law
Stanley Baldwin
Preceded by The Earl of Chesterfield
Succeeded by The Earl of Granard
Personal details
Born15 July 1862 (1862-07-15)
The Stable Yard, St James's, London
Died9 June 1946 (1946-06-10) (aged 83)
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s)Violet Mordaunt
(1869–1928)
Alma mater Balliol College, Oxford

Thomas Henry Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath KG CB PC JP (15 July 1862 – 9 June 1946), styled Viscount Weymouth until 1896, was a British landowner and Conservative politician. He held ministerial office as Under-Secretary of State for India in 1905 and Master of the Horse between 1922 and 1924. He was also involved in local politics and served as Chairman of Wiltshire County Council between 1906 and his death in 1946.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, commonly known as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or simply the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Conservative Party (UK) Political party in the United Kingdom

The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party, known informally as the Tories, and historically also known as the Unionist Party, is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom. The governing party since 2010, it is the largest in the House of Commons, with 288 Members of Parliament, and also has 234 members of the House of Lords, 4 members of the European Parliament, 31 Members of the Scottish Parliament, 11 members of the Welsh Assembly, 8 members of the London Assembly and 7,445 local councillors.

This is a list of Parliamentary Under-Secretaries of State and Permanent Under-Secretaries of State at the India Office during the period of British rule between 1858 and 1937 for India(and Burma by extension), and for India and Burma from 1937 to 1948.

Contents

Background and education

Known by the courtesy title Viscount Weymouth from birth, he was born at The Stable Yard, St James's, London, the eldest son of John Thynne, 4th Marquess of Bath, by the Honourable Frances Isabella Catherine Vesey, daughter of Thomas Vesey, 3rd Viscount de Vesci. He was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford, [1] graduating in 1886 with a Bachelor of Arts (BA) and in 1888 with a Master of Arts (MA) degree. [2]

A courtesy title is a title that does not have legal significance but rather is used through custom or courtesy, particularly, in the context of nobility, the titles used by children of members of the nobility.

St Jamess district in the City of Westminster, London, England

St James's is a central district in the City of Westminster, London, forming part of the West End. In the 17th century the area developed as a residential location for the British aristocracy, and around the 19th century was the focus of the development of gentlemen's clubs. Anciently part of the parish of St Martin in the Fields, much of it formed the parish of St James from 1685 to 1922. Since the Second World War the area has transitioned from residential to commercial use.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

Political career

Lord Weymouth sat as Member of Parliament for Frome between 1886 and 1892 and from 1895 to 1896, when he succeeded his father in the marquessate and entered the House of Lords. [3] He served under Arthur Balfour as Under-Secretary of State for India between January and December 1905. He was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Somerset in 1904 and Chairman of Wiltshire County Council in 1906, and held both posts simultaneously until his death in 1946. [4]

Frome was a constituency centred on the town of Frome in Somerset. It returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1832, until it was abolished for the 1950 general election. Between 1832 and 1885, it was a parliamentary borough; after 1885 it was a county constituency, a division of Somerset.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers and domestically usually referred to simply as the Lords, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Arthur Balfour British Conservative politician and statesman

Arthur James Balfour, 1st Earl of Balfour, was a British statesman and Conservative Party politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1902 to 1905. As Foreign Secretary under David Lloyd George, he issued the Balfour Declaration in November 1917 on behalf of the cabinet.

Lord Bath was made a Knight of the Garter in 1917. [5] He returned to the government in 1922, when Bonar Law appointed him Master of the Horse. [6] He was sworn of the Privy Council at the same time. [7] He continued in this office until the Conservative government fell in January 1924, the last year under the premiership of Stanley Baldwin. [8]

Order of the Garter Order of chivalry in England

The Most Noble Order of the Garter is an order of chivalry founded by King Edward III of England in 1348. It is the most senior order of knighthood in the British honours system, outranked in precedence only by the Victoria Cross and the George Cross. The Order of the Garter is dedicated to the image and arms of Saint George, England's patron saint.

Bonar Law former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Andrew Bonar Law was a British Conservative politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1922 to 1923.

Master of the Horse position of varying importance in several European nations

The Master of the Horse was a position of varying importance in several European nations.

Lord Bath was also a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry and an Honorary Colonel of that regiment and of the 4th Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry. In 1937 he was appointed Pro-Chancellor of Bristol University. [8]

Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry

The Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry (RWY) was a Yeomanry regiment of the Kingdom of Great Britain and the United Kingdom established in 1794. It was disbanded as an independent Territorial Army unit in 1967, a time when the strength of the Territorial Army was greatly reduced. The regiment lives on in B and Y Squadrons of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry.

Somerset Light Infantry

The Somerset Light Infantry was a light infantry infantry regiment of the British Army, which served under various titles from 1685 to 1959. In 1959, the regiment was amalgamated with the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry to form the Somerset and Cornwall Light Infantry which was again amalgamated, in 1968, with the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, the King's Shropshire Light Infantry and the Durham Light Infantry to form The Light Infantry. In 2007, however, The Light Infantry was amalgamated further with the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment, the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment and the Royal Green Jackets to form The Rifles.

Family

A house party at Witley Court in the late 1880s, the 5th Marquess of Bath seated 5th from right, next to Violet Mordaunt (daughter of Harriet Mordaunt) whom he later married Witley Court Fountain.jpg
A house party at Witley Court in the late 1880s, the 5th Marquess of Bath seated 5th from right, next to Violet Mordaunt (daughter of Harriet Mordaunt) whom he later married
Garter-encircled shield of arms of Thomas Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath, KG, as displayed on his Order of the Garter stall plate in St. George's Chapel. Shield of Arms of Thomas Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath, KG, CB, PC, JP.png
Garter-encircled shield of arms of Thomas Thynne, 5th Marquess of Bath, KG, as displayed on his Order of the Garter stall plate in St. George's Chapel.

On 19 April 1890, Lord Bath married Violet Caroline Mordaunt, daughter of Harriet, Lady Mordaunt. At the time of Violet's birth her mother had been the wife of Sir Charles Mordaunt, 10th Baronet, but she was said to be the illegitimate daughter of Viscount Cole, who was later co-respondent in a divorce action. [9] They had five children:

Harriet Mordaunt 19th century British woman notably involved in scandals

Harriet Sarah, Lady Mordaunt was the Scottish wife of an English baronet and Member of Parliament, Sir Charles Mordaunt. She was the respondent in a sensational divorce case in which the Prince of Wales was embroiled, and after a counter-petition had led to a finding of mental disorder she spent the remaining thirty-six years of her life out of sight in a series of privately rented houses, and then in various private lunatic asylums, finally ending her days in Sutton, Surrey.

Sir Charles Mordaunt, 10th Baronet was a wealthy English country gentleman, a Conservative Member of Parliament for South Warwickshire (1859–1868) and High Sheriff of Warwickshire in 1879. He became notorious for involving the future King Edward VII in his divorce case.

Lowry Cole, 4th Earl of Enniskillen British politician

Lowry Egerton Cole, 4th Earl of Enniskillen,, styled Viscount Cole from 1850 to 1886, was an Irish peer and Conservative Member of Parliament.

The Marchioness of Bath died in May 1928, aged 59. Lord Bath remained a widower until his death in June 1946, aged 83. He was succeeded by his second and only surviving son, Henry. [8]

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References

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  5. "No. 29986". The London Gazette . 16 March 1917. p. 2627.
  6. "No. 32775". The London Gazette . 8 December 1922. p. 8702.
  7. "No. 32775". The London Gazette . 8 December 1922. p. 8689.
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  9. Daily Telegraph, 3 October 2001 & 16 January 2002.
  10. https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/252754/thynne,-john-alexander/
  11. Daily Telegraph: royal wedding photograph https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/royalty/9176069/The-Queen-Mother-in-pictures.html?frame=2181538
  12. Burke, Sir Bernard, (1938 ed) Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage. Shaw, London. p. 243
  13. 1 2 3 Woodfall, H. (1768). The Peerage of England; Containing a Genealogical and Historical Account of All the Peers of that Kingdom Etc. Fourth Edition, Carefully Corrected, and Continued to the Present Time, Volume 6. p. 258.
  14. 1 2 Lee, Sidney; Edwards, A. S. G. (revised) (2004). "Thynne, William (d. 1546)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27426.(Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
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Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Lawrence James Baker
Member of Parliament for Frome
18861892
Succeeded by
John Barlow
Preceded by
John Barlow
Member of Parliament for Frome
1895–1896
Succeeded by
John Barlow
Political offices
Preceded by
Earl Percy
Under-Secretary of State for India
January–December 1905
Succeeded by
John Ellis
Preceded by
The Earl of Chesterfield
Master of the Horse
1922–1924
Succeeded by
The Earl of Granard
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Cork
Lord Lieutenant of Somerset
1904–1946
Succeeded by
Sir James Somerville
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Thynne
Marquess of Bath
1896–1946
Succeeded by
Henry Thynne