Thomas Tillinghast

Last updated
Thomas Tillinghast
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Rhode Island's at-large congressional district
In office
November 13, 1797 March 3, 1799
Preceded by Francis Malbone
Succeeded by John Brown (Rhode Island)
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Rhode Island's at-large congressional district
In office
March 4, 1801 March 3, 1803
Preceded by Christopher G. Champlin
Succeeded by Nehemiah Knight
Personal details
Born(1742-08-21)August 21, 1742
DiedAugust 26, 1821(1821-08-26) (aged 79)
East Greenwich, Rhode Island

Thomas Tillinghast (August 21, 1742 – August 26, 1821) was a United States Representative from Rhode Island. Born in East Greenwich, Tillinghast was elected as a member of the Rhode Island House of Representatives and served from 1772 to 1773. He held several offices under the Revolutionary authorities and again served in the Rhode Island House of Representatives from 1778 to 1780. He was a judge of the Court of Common Pleas in 1779. He was a member of the council of war. He served as an Associate Justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court from 1780 to 1797.

Rhode Island State of the United States of America

Rhode Island, officially the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, is a state in the New England region of the United States. It is the smallest state in area, the seventh least populous, and the second most densely populated, but it has the longest official name of any state. Rhode Island is bordered by Connecticut to the west, Massachusetts to the north and east, and the Atlantic Ocean to the south via Rhode Island Sound and Block Island Sound. It also shares a small maritime border with New York. Providence is the state capital and most populous city in Rhode Island.

East Greenwich, Rhode Island Town in Rhode Island, United States

East Greenwich is an affluent town and the county seat of Kent County, Rhode Island, United States. The population was 13,146 at the 2010 census. East Greenwich is the wealthiest municipality within the state of Rhode Island. It is part of the Providence metropolitan statistical area and the Boston-Worcester-Providence combined statistical area.

Rhode Island House of Representatives

The Rhode Island House of Representatives is the lower house of the Rhode Island General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Rhode Island, the upper house being the Rhode Island Senate. It is composed of 75 members, elected to two year terms from 75 districts of equal population. The Rhode Island General Assembly does not have term limits. The House meets at the Rhode Island State Capitol in Providence.

He was a great grandson of Rev. Pardon Tillinghast (1622–1718)

Pardon Tillinghast (1625–1718) was an early settler of Providence, Rhode Island, a public official there, and a pastor of the Baptist Church of Providence. A cooper by profession, he immigrated to New England about 1645, and became a successful merchant. Later in life he became a clergyman, serving without compensation for nearly four decades. He died in 1718 aged about 96, and was buried in a family cemetery on Benefit Street in Providence that remains extant. Among his thousands of descendants are many of great prominence, including Continental Congress delegate Samuel Ward; Julia Ward Howe who wrote the Battle Hymn of the Republic; and Stephen Arnold Douglas who was involved in a series of famed debates with Abraham Lincoln in 1858, prior to a Senate race, and later lost to him in the 1860 presidential election.

Tillinghast was elected as a Federalist to the Fifth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Elisha R. Potter and served from November 13, 1797, to March 3, 1799. He was again elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Seventh Congress and served from March 4, 1801 to March 3, 1803.

Federalist Party first American political party

The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration party until the 3rd United States Congress as opposed to their opponents in the Anti-Administration party, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to the 1820s, with their last presidential candidate being fielded in 1816. They appealed to business and to conservatives who favored banks, national over state government, manufacturing, and preferred Britain and opposed the French Revolution.

5th United States Congress 1797-1799 legislative term

The Fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met at Congress Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from March 4, 1797, to March 4, 1799, during the first two years of John Adams' presidency.

Elisha R. Potter American judge

Elisha Reynolds Potter was a politician and jurist from Kingston, Rhode Island. He was a justice of the Rhode Island Supreme Court, and served one term in the United States House of Representatives.

Tillinghast died in East Greenwich, Rhode Island on August 26, 1821. Interment was in Tillinghast Lot (Rhode Island Historical Cemetery East Greenwich #18) located on South County Road, East Greenwich.

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References

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Francis Malbone
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Rhode Island's at-large congressional district

November 13, 1797 – March 3, 1799
Succeeded by
John Brown
Preceded by
Christopher G. Champlin
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Rhode Island's at-large congressional district

March 4, 1801 – March 3, 1803
Succeeded by
Nehemiah Knight