Thomas Treadwell Davis

Last updated
Thomas T. Davis
Thomas Treadwell Davis.jpg
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from New York's 23rd district
In office
4 March 1863 3 March 1867
Preceded by Ambrose W. Clark
Succeeded by Dennis McCarthy
Personal details
BornThomas Treadwell Davis
(1810-08-22)August 22, 1810
Middlebury, Vermont, US
Died May 2, 1872(1872-05-02) (aged 61)
Washington, D.C., US
Resting place Oakwood Cemetery
Syracuse, New York
Nationality American
Political party Unionist
Other political
affiliations
Republican
Relations Thomas Tredwell
Education Hamilton College
Occupation Lawyer, Politician

Thomas Treadwell Davis (August 22, 1810 – May 2, 1872) was an American lawyer and politician in the U.S. state of New York. He served as a United States Representative from New York during the latter half of the American Civil War and the subsequent beginning of Reconstruction.

New York (state) State of the United States of America

New York is a state in the Northeastern United States. New York was one of the original Thirteen Colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.54 million residents in 2018, it is the fourth most populous state. To distinguish the state from the city in the state with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Contents

Early life and education

Davis was born in Middlebury, Vermont, [1] and moved to New York in 1817 with his parents who eventually settled in Clinton. He attended Clinton Academy and graduated from Hamilton College in 1831. [2] Davis then moved to Syracuse, studied law, and was admitted to the bar. He began the practice of law in Syracuse.

Middlebury, Vermont Town in Vermont, United States

Middlebury is the shire town of Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 8,496 at the 2010 census. Middlebury is home to Middlebury College and the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History.

Clinton, Oneida County, New York Village in New York, United States

Clinton is a village in Oneida County, New York, United States. The population was 1,942 at the 2010 census. It was named for George Clinton, the first Governor of New York.

Political career

He held many political positions in New York and was elected as a Unionist candidate to the 38th Congress. Davis was re-elected as a Republican to the 39th Congress, serving from March 4, 1863 to March 3, 1867. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1866 and after leaving Congress he resumed the practice of law in Syracuse.

38th United States Congress

The Thirty-eighth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1863, to March 4, 1865, during the last two years of the first administration of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Eighth Census of the United States in 1860. The Senate had a Republican majority, and the House of Representatives had a Republican plurality.

Republican Party (United States) political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

39th United States Congress

The Thirty-ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1865, to March 4, 1867, during the first month of Abraham Lincoln's fifth year as president, and the first two years of the administration of his successor, U.S. President Andrew Johnson.

Davis died in Washington, D.C. on May 2, 1872. His remains were cremated and the ashes deposited in Oakwood Cemetery in Syracuse.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, first President of the United States and Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Oakwood Cemetery (Syracuse, New York) cemetery in Syracuse, New York

Oakwood Cemetery is a 160-acre (65 ha) historic cemetery located in Syracuse, New York. It was designed by Howard Daniels and built in 1859. Oakwood Cemetery was created during a time period in the nineteenth century when the rural cemetery was becoming a distinct landscape type, and is a good example of this kind of landscape architecture.

Family life

Davis had an interest in railroading and coal mining. His grandfather Thomas Tredwell represented New York in the United States House of Representatives from 1791-1795. [3]

Thomas Tredwell American statesman

Thomas Tredwell was an American lawyer and politician from Plattsburg, New York. He served in the New York State Senate and represented New York in the United States House of Representatives from 1791 to 1795.

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References

  1. "Middlebury, Vermont". City-Data.com. Retrieved June 25, 2014.
  2. Hamilton College (1860). Catalogue. Hamilton College. p. 33. Retrieved 15 July 2014.
  3. "TREDWELL, Thomas, (1743 - 1831)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress:. Retrieved July 9, 2014.

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.


U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Ambrose W. Clark
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 23rd congressional district

18631867
Succeeded by
Dennis McCarthy