Thomas Treloar

Last updated

Thomas Treloar
Thomas Treloar.jpg
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Gwydir
In office
10 December 1949 15 November 1953
Preceded by William Scully
Succeeded by Ian Allan
Personal details
Born(1892-08-01)1 August 1892
Tamworth, New South Wales
Died15 November 1953(1953-11-15) (aged 61)
Tamworth, New South Wales
Nationality Australian
Political party Australian Country Party
OccupationCompany director

Thomas John Treloar (1 August 1892 – 15 November 1953) was an Australian politician. Born in Tamworth, New South Wales, he was educated at Sydney Grammar School before returning to Tamworth as a shopkeeper. He eventually became a company director before serving in World War I 1915–18 and World War II 1942–46. In 1949, he was elected to the Australian House of Representatives as the Country Party member for Gwydir, defeating Labor minister William Scully. He died in 1953, necessitating a by-election for his seat. [1]

Australia Country in Oceania

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the largest country in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country by total area. The neighbouring countries are Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and East Timor to the north; the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu to the north-east; and New Zealand to the south-east. The population of 25 million is highly urbanised and heavily concentrated on the eastern seaboard. Australia's capital is Canberra, and its largest city is Sydney. The country's other major metropolitan areas are Melbourne, Brisbane, Perth, and Adelaide.

Tamworth, New South Wales City in New South Wales, Australia

Tamworth is a city and the major regional centre in the New England region of northern New South Wales, Australia. Situated on the Peel River within the local government area of Tamworth Regional Council, about 318 km from the Queensland border, it is located almost midway between Brisbane and Sydney. According to the 2016 Census, the city had a population around 60,000.

Sydney Grammar School grammar school in Sydney, Australia

Sydney Grammar School is an independent, fee-paying, non-denominational, day school for boys, located in Darlinghurst, Edgecliff and St Ives, which are all suburbs of Sydney, Australia.

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References

  1. Carr, Adam (2008). "Australian Election Archive". Psephos, Adam Carr's Election Archive. Retrieved 7 June 2008.
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
William Scully
Member for Gwydir
1949–1953
Succeeded by
Ian Allan