Thomas Trevor, 1st Baron Trevor

Last updated

The Lord Trevor

PC
1stBaronTrevor.jpg
Chief Justice Trevor
Lord President of the Council
In office
8 May 19 June 1730
Monarch George II
Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole
Preceded by The Duke of Devonshire
Succeeded by The Earl of Wilmington

Thomas Trevor, 1st Baron Trevor, PC (8 March 1658 – 19 June 1730) was a British judge and politician who was Attorney-General and later Lord Privy Seal.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Lord Privy Seal sinecure office of state in the UK

The Lord Privy Seal is the fifth of the Great Officers of State in the United Kingdom, ranking beneath the Lord President of the Council and above the Lord Great Chamberlain. Originally, its holder was responsible for the monarch's personal (privy) seal until the use of such a seal became obsolete. The office is currently one of the traditional sinecure offices of state. Today, the holder of the office is invariably given a seat in the Cabinet of the United Kingdom.

Contents

Biography

Trevor was the second son of John Trevor (1626–1672). [1] and was educated privately before entering the Inner Temple (1672) and Christ Church, Oxford. He was called to the bar in 1680. [2]

Sir John Trevor was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1646 and 1672.

Inner Temple one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, a person must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London.

Christ Church, Oxford constituent college of the University of Oxford in England

Christ Church is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Christ Church is a joint foundation of the college and the cathedral of the Oxford diocese, which serves as the college chapel and whose dean is ex officio the college head.

He was made KC in 1683 and was knighted and made Solicitor General in 1692, being promoted to Attorney-General in 1695. In 1701 Trevor was appointed Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. He was also a Privy Councillor (1702–1714) and First Commissioner of the Great Seal (1710). In 1712 he was created a peer as Baron Trevor of Bromham. [3]

Knight An award of an honorary title for past or future service with its roots in chivalry in the Middle Ages

A knight is a man granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch, bishop or other political or religious leader for service to the monarch or a Christian church, especially in a military capacity.

Chief Justice of the Common Pleas

The Chief Justice of the Common Pleas was the head of the Court of Common Pleas, also known as the Common Bench or Common Place, which was the second-highest common law court in the English legal system until 1875, when it, along with the other two common law courts and the equity and probate courts, became part of the High Court of Justice. As such, the Chief Justice of the Common Pleas was one of the highest judicial officials in England, behind only the Lord High Chancellor and the Lord Chief Justice of England, who headed the Queen's Bench.

Lord Keeper of the Great Seal former officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of the Great Seal of England

The Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England, and later of Great Britain, was formerly an officer of the English Crown charged with physical custody of the Great Seal of England. This position evolved into one of the Great Officers of State.

On the accession of George I in 1714 he was deprived of his offices for alleged Jacobite sympathies, but from 1726 he was restored to favour as Lord Privy Seal (1726 to his death), [3] one of the Lords Justice Regents of the Realm (1727), Lord President of the Council (1730) and Governor of the Charterhouse. [2]

Lord President of the Council position

The Lord President of the Council is the fourth of the Great Officers of State of the United Kingdom, ranking below the Lord High Treasurer but above the Lord Privy Seal. The Lord President usually attends and is responsible for presiding over meetings of the Privy Council, presenting business for the monarch's approval. In the modern era, the holder is by convention always a member of one of the Houses of Parliament, and the office is normally a Cabinet post.

In 1707 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. [2]

Fellow of the Royal Society Elected Fellow of the Royal Society, including Honorary, Foreign and Royal Fellows

Fellowship of the Royal Society is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society of London judges to have made a 'substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science, and medical science'.

Family

In 1690 he married Elizabeth Searle (d. 1702), daughter of John Searle of Finchley; their two sons, Thomas and John, succeeded their father in turn but died without male issue, the peerage devolving upon Trevor's son from his second marriage, Robert_Hampden-Trevor,_1st_Viscount_Hampden. [4]

Robert Hampden-Trevor, 1st Viscount Hampden was a British diplomat at The Hague and then joint Postmaster General.

In 1704 he married Anne Bernard, (c.1670-1723), the daughter of Robert Weldon (or Weildon), mercer in Fleet Street, London. Anne had previously been married to Sir Robert Bernard of Brampton, with whom she had had six children. [5] Three of Trevor's sons succeeded in turn to his barony, and a fourth son, Richard Trevor (1707–1771), was bishop of St Davids from 1744 to 1752, and then bishop of Durham. [3]

Notes

  1. Chisholm 1911, p. 256.
  2. 1 2 3 "Fellow details". Royal Society. Retrieved 28 January 2017.
  3. 1 2 3 Chisholm 1911, p. 257.
  4. Rigg, James McMullen (1899). "Trevor, Thomas (1658-1730)"  . In Lee, Sidney (ed.). Dictionary of National Biography . 57. London: Smith, Elder & Co. pp. 228–230.
  5. Palmer, Kathleen (2018). Ladies of Quality & Distinction. London: The Foundling Museum. p. 12.

Related Research Articles

John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby 17th/18th-century English poet and politician

John Sheffield, 1st Duke of Buckingham and Normanby, was an English poet and Tory politician of the late Stuart period who served as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council. He was also known by his original title, Lord Mulgrave.

Henry Montagu, 1st Earl of Manchester English noble and politician

Henry Montagu, 1st Earl of Manchester was an English judge, politician and peer.

John Hampden-Trevor, 3rd Viscount Hampden PC, was a British diplomat.

Edward Thurlow, 1st Baron Thurlow British lawyer and Tory politician

Edward Thurlow, 1st Baron Thurlow, PC, KC was a British lawyer and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1765 to 1778 when he was raised to the peerage as Baron Thurlow. He served as Lord Chancellor of Great Britain for fourteen years and under four Prime Ministers.

Daniel Waterland English theologian

Daniel Cosgrove Waterland was an English theologian. He became Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge in 1714, Chancellor of the Diocese of York in 1722, and Archdeacon of Middlesex in 1730.

James Graham, 1st Duke of Montrose British politician

James Graham, 1st Duke and 4th Marquess of Montrose was a Scottish aristocratic statesman in the early eighteenth century.

John Murray, 1st Duke of Atholl Scottish politician and noble

John Murray, 1st Duke of Atholl, KT, PC was a Scottish nobleman, politician, and soldier. He served in numerous positions during his life, and fought in the Glorious Revolution for William III and Mary II.

Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough British Army general

Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough,, styled as The Honourable Charles Spencer between 1706 and 1729 and as The Earl of Sunderland between 1729 and 1733, was a British soldier, nobleman, and politician from the Spencer family. He briefly served as Lord Privy Seal in 1755. He led British forces during the Raid on St Malo in 1758. He is the great-great-great-great-grandfather of Sir Winston Churchill.

James Ogilvy, 4th Earl of Findlater Scottish politician

James Ogilvy, 4th Earl of Findlater and 1st Earl of Seafield, was a Scottish politician.

John Hamilton-Leslie, 9th Earl of Rothes (1679–1722) was a Scottish nobleman who fought on the side of George I during the Jacobite rising of 1715.

James Douglas, 2nd Duke of Queensberry 17th/18th-century Scottish duke and politician

James Douglas, 2nd Duke of Queensberry and 1st Duke of Dover was a Scottish nobleman.

John Murray, 1st Marquess of Atholl Scottish judge

John Murray, 1st Marquess of Atholl, KT was a leading Scottish royalist and defender of the Stuarts during the English Civil War of the 1640s, until after the rise to power of William and Mary in 1689. He succeeded as 2nd Earl of Atholl on his father's demise in June 1642 and as 3rd Earl of Tullibardine after the death of his first cousin the 2nd Earl in 1670.

John Finch, 1st Baron Finch English politician

John Finch, 1st Baron Finch was an English judge, and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1621 and 1629. He was Speaker of the House of Commons.

John Lindsay, 19th Earl of Crawford British peer and politician

John Lindsay, 19th Earl of Crawford and 3rd Earl of Lindsay was a Scottish peer and politician.

Robert Clayton (Lord Mayor) Lord Mayor of London, 1679–1680

Sir Robert Clayton (1629–1707) was a British merchant banker, politician and Lord Mayor of London.

William Johnstone, 1st Marquess of Annandale

William Johnstone, 2nd Earl of Annandale and Hartfell, 1st Marquess of Annandale KT was a Scottish nobleman. He was the son of James Johnstone, 1st Earl of Annandale and Hartfell and Henrietta Douglas. He succeeded to the Earldom of Annandale and Hartfell on the death of his father in 1672.

Sir William Anstruther, Lord Anstruther was a Scottish judge.

Anne Weldon Bernard was an English aristocrat and philanthropist.

References

Further reading

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Sir George Treby
John Pollexfen
Member of Parliament for Plympton Erle
1692–1698
With: John Pollexfen 1692–1695
Courtenay Croker 1695–1698
Succeeded by
Martin Ryder
Courtenay Croker
Preceded by
Henry Pelham
Thomas Pelham
Member of Parliament for Lewes
1701
With: Thomas Pelham
Succeeded by
Henry Pelham
Thomas Pelham
Legal offices
Preceded by
Sir John Somers
Solicitor General
1692–1695
Succeeded by
Sir John Hawles
Preceded by
Sir Edward Ward
Attorney General
1695–1701
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Northey
Preceded by
Sir George Treby
Chief Justice of the Common Pleas
1701–1714
Succeeded by
Sir Peter King
Political offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Kingston
Lord Privy Seal
1726–1730
Succeeded by
The Earl of Wilmington
Preceded by
The Duke of Devonshire
Lord President of the Council
1730
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Baron Trevor
2nd creation
1712–1730
Succeeded by
Thomas Trevor