Thomas Trevor, 22nd Baron Dacre

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Thomas Crosbie William Trevor, 22nd Baron Dacre Thomas Crosbie William Trevor, 22nd Baron Dacre.jpg
Thomas Crosbie William Trevor, 22nd Baron Dacre

Thomas Crosbie William Trevor, 22nd Baron Dacre (5 December 1808 – 26 February 1890) was a British landowner and politician.

Contents

Background

Born Thomas Brand, Dacre was the eldest son of General Henry Trevor, 21st Baron Dacre, and Pyne, daughter of the Very Reverend Maurice Crosbie, Dean of Limerick. Henry Brand, 1st Viscount Hampden, Speaker of the House of Commons, was his younger brother. In 1824 he assumed by Royal licence the surname of Trevor in lieu of his patronymic. Educated at Christ Church Oxford he was a member of Boodle's, White's and Brooks' clubs.

Henry Trevor, 21st Baron Dacre British Army general

Henry Otway Trevor, 21st Baron Dacre, CB was a British peer and soldier.

Henry Brand, 1st Viscount Hampden British Liberal politician, Speaker of the House of Commons

Henry Bouverie William Brand, 1st Viscount Hampden, was a British Liberal politician. He served as Speaker of the House of Commons from 1872 to 1884.

Boodles gentlemens club in London, England

Boodle's is a London gentlemen's club, founded in January 1762, at No. 50 Pall Mall, London, by Lord Shelburne, the future Marquess of Lansdowne and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

Political career

Dacre was returned to Parliament as one of three representatives for Hertfordshire in 1847, a seat he held until 1852. The following year he succeeded his father in the barony and entered the House of Lords. Between 1865 and 1869 he served as Lord Lieutenant of Essex.

Hertfordshire was a county constituency covering the county of Hertfordshire in England. It returned two Knights of the Shire to the House of Commons of England until 1707, then to the House of Commons of Great Britain until 1800, and to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1800 until 1832. The Reform Act 1832 gave the county a third seat with effect from the 1832 general election.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant of Essex. Since 1688, all the Lord Lieutenants have also been Custos Rotulorum of Essex.

Estates

According to John Bateman, who derived his information from statistics published in 1873, Lord Dacre, of The Hoo, Kimpton, Welwyn, had around 13,000 acres comprising: 6,658 acres in Hertfordshire (worth 9,527 guineas per annum), 3,600 acres in Essex (worth 3,550 guineas per annum), 2,081 acres in Cambridge (worth 2,323 guineas per annum) and 978 acres in Suffolk (worth 1,223 guineas per annum).

John Bateman (1839–1910) published in 1883 the fourth edition of his 1876 The Acre-Ocracy of England retitled The Great Landowners of Great Britain and Ireland, A list of all owners of Three thousand acres and upwards, worth £3,000 a year; Also, one thousand three hundred owners of Two thousand acres and upwards, in England, Scotland, Ireland, & Wales, their acreage and income from Land, Culled from 'THE MODERN DOMESDAY BOOK, under the Harrison imprint. His source for the data was the government produced survey Return of Owners of Land, 1873, often known as the Modern Domesday Book, the many errors in which he revised and corrected. The preface to his work sets out many of the criticisms of the original 1873 Return and identifies some of the commonest errors contained in it.

Kimpton is a village in Hertfordshire, England, six miles south of Hitchin and four miles from Harpenden and Luton. The population at the 2011 Census was 2,167.

Family

Lord Dacre married the Hon. Susan Sophia, daughter of Charles Cavendish, 1st Baron Chesham, in 1837. They had no children. He died at The Hoo, Hertfordshire, in February 1890, aged 81, and was succeeded in the barony by his younger brother, Lord Hampden. Lady Dacre died in August 1896, aged 79.

Charles Compton Cavendish, 1st Baron Chesham was a British Liberal politician.

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References

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Hon. Granville Ryder
Thomas Plumer Halsey
Abel Smith
Member of Parliament for Hertfordshire
1847–1852
With: Thomas Plumer Halsey
Sir Henry Meux, Bt
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Bt
Thomas Plumer Halsey
Sir Henry Meux, Bt
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Viscount Maynard
Lord Lieutenant of Essex
1865–1869
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Western, Bt
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Henry Otway Trevor
Baron Dacre
1st creation
1853–1890
Succeeded by
Henry Bouverie William Brand