Thomas Troward

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Thomas Troward
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New Thought

Thomas Troward (1847–1916) was an English author whose works influenced the New Thought Movement and mystic Christianity.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Mysticism Practice of religious experiences during alternate states of consciousness

Mysticism is the practice of religious ecstasies, together with whatever ideologies, ethics, rites, myths, legends, and magic may be related to them. It may also refer to the attainment of insight in ultimate or hidden truths, and to human transformation supported by various practices and experiences.

Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth. Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and the savior of all people, whose coming as the Messiah was prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament. It is the world's largest religion with about 2.4 billion followers.

Contents

Background

Troward was a divisional Judge in British-administered India. His avocation was the study of comparative religion.

India Country in South Asia

India is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west; China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the north; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives; its Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia.

Avocation calling, which may or may not provide employment

An avocation is an activity that someone engages in as a hobby outside their main occupation. There are many examples of people whose professions were the ways that they made their livings, but for whom their activities outside their workplaces were their true passions in life. Occasionally, as with Lord Baden-Powell and others, people who pursue an avocation are more remembered by history for their avocation than for their professional career.

After his retirement from the judiciary in 1896, Troward set out to apply logic and a judicial weighing of evidence in the study of matters of cause and effect. [1] The philosopher William James characterized Troward’s Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science as "far and away the ablest statement of philosophy I have met, beautiful in its sustained clearness of thought and style, a really classic statement." [2]

William James American philosopher, psychologist, and pragmatist

William James was an American philosopher and psychologist, and the first educator to offer a psychology course in the United States. James is considered to be a leading thinker of the late nineteenth century, one of the most influential philosophers of the United States, and the "Father of American psychology".

Philosophy The rational investigation of the truths and principles of being, knowledge, or conduct.

Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental questions about existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. Such questions are often posed as problems to be studied or resolved. The term was probably coined by Pythagoras. Philosophical methods include questioning, critical discussion, rational argument, and systematic presentation. Classic philosophical questions include: Is it possible to know anything and to prove it? What is most real? Philosophers also pose more practical and concrete questions such as: Is there a best way to live? Is it better to be just or unjust? Do humans have free will?

According to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) archivist Nell Wing, early AA members were strongly encouraged to read Thomas Troward's Edinburgh Lectures on Mental Science. [3] In the opening of the 2006 film The Secret, introductory remarks credit Troward's philosophy with inspiring the movie and its production. [4]

Alcoholics Anonymous mutual aid movement

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an international mutual aid fellowship with the stated purpose of enabling its members to "stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety." AA is nonprofessional, self-supporting, and apolitical. Its only membership requirement is a desire to stop drinking. The AA program of recovery is set forth in the Twelve Steps.

The Secret is a 2006 Australian-American documentary film consisting of a series of interviews designed to demonstrate the New Thought claim that everything one wants or needs can be satisfied by believing in an outcome, repeatedly thinking about it, and maintaining positive emotional states to "attract" the desired outcome.

Troward was a past president of the International New Thought Alliance.

The International New Thought Alliance (INTA) is an umbrella organization for New Thought adherents "dedicated to serving the New Thought Movement’s various branches, organizations and individuals".

Geneviève Behrend studied with Troward from 1912 until 1914; Behrend was the only personal student he had throughout his life. [5] [6] [7]

Geneviève Behrend was a French-born author and teacher of Mental Science, a New Thought discipline created by Thomas Troward.

Bibliography

See also

Related Research Articles

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In philosophy, idealism is the group of metaphysical philosophies which assert that reality, or reality as humans can know it, is fundamentally mental, mentally constructed, or otherwise immaterial. Epistemologically, idealism manifests as a skepticism about the possibility of knowing any mind-independent thing. In contrast to materialism, idealism asserts the primacy of consciousness as the origin and prerequisite of material phenomena. According to this view, consciousness exists before and is the pre-condition of material existence. Consciousness creates and determines the material and not vice versa. Idealism believes consciousness and mind to be the origin of the material world and aims to explain the existing world according to these principles.

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References

  1. The History and Philosophy of the Metaphysical Movements in America - Page 209 by J. Stillson Judah - Sects - 1967
  2. The Science of Living the Life You've Always Wanted - Page 207 by Richard Lanoue, Author Richard Lanoue
  3. Hart, Kenneth Recovery From Alcoholism: The 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous and Eastern Spirituality, accessed September 2008.
  4. Screenwriter Claims 'The Secret' Has Its Roots in a 100-Year-Old Philosophy Called the New Thought Movement
  5. Kelly, Karen (2007). The secret of the secret: unlocking the mysteries of the runaway bestseller. New York: Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press. ISBN   0-312-37790-8.
  6. Capelouto, Nina. "Metaphysical Teacher Genevieve Behrend Born 1881". Bios of Metaphysical Teachers, Metaphysics, Thoughts Are Things. Metaphysical Teachers. Archived from the original on 5 November 2012. Retrieved 7 April 2013.
  7. BEHREND, GENEVIEVE. "Your Invisible Power". THE ELIZABETH TOWNE CO. INC. Retrieved 7 April 2013.

Further reading