Thomas Trumble

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Thomas Trumble

CMG , CBE
Secretary of the Department of Defence
In office
February 1918 July 1927
Prime Minister Billy Hughes (1918–23)
Stanley Bruce (1923–27)
Minister George Pearce (1918–21)
Walter Massy-Greene (1921–23)
Eric Bowden (1923–25)
Sir Neville Howse (1925–27)
Sir William Glasgow (1927)
Preceded by Sir Samuel Pethebridge
Succeeded by Malcolm Shepherd
Personal details
Born(1872-04-09)9 April 1872
Ararat, Victoria
Died2 July 1954(1954-07-02) (aged 82)
Caulfield, Victoria
NationalityAustralian
Education Wesley College, Melbourne
OccupationPublic servant
Awards Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George
Commander of the Order of the British Empire

Thomas Trumble, CMG , CBE (9 April 1872 – 2 July 1954) was a career Australian public servant who was appointed acting Secretary of the Department of Defence during the First World War, and Secretary from 1918 to 1927.

Departmental secretary senior public servant of a Commonwealth or state government department

In the administration of government in Australia, a departmental secretary is the most senior public servant of a Commonwealth or state government department, charged with leading the department on a day-to-day basis.

The Department of Defence is a department of the Government of Australia charged with the responsibility to defend Australia and its national interests. Along with the Australian Defence Force (ADF), it forms part of the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) and is accountable to the Commonwealth Parliament, on behalf of the Australian people, for the efficiency and effectiveness with which it carries out the Government's defence policy.

Trumble was the first Secretary who did not have a military background. After his Secretary role, he subsequently served as official secretary to the high commission for Australia in London, and Australian Defence Liaison Officer in London, retiring in 1932. During the Second World War, he was welcomed when he returned to public service from 1940 to 1943 as director of voluntary services, Department of Defence Co-ordination. [1]

The Department of Defence Co-ordination was an Australian government department that existed between November 1939 and April 1942.

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References

  1. Hyslop, Robert (1990), "Trumble, Thomas (1872–1954)", Australian Dictionary of Biography, MUP, 12, archived from the original on 8 October 2012
Government offices
Preceded by
Sir Samuel Pethebridge
Secretary of the Department of Defence (I)
1918–1921
Succeeded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Defence (II)
Preceded by
Himself
as Secretary of the Department of Defence (I)
Secretary of the Department of Defence (II)
1921–1927
Succeeded by
Malcolm Shepherd