Thomas Tudor Tucker (Royal Navy officer)

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Thomas Tudor Tucker
Born29 June 1775
Died20 July 1852 (aged 77)
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branch Royal Navy
Years of service1793–1846
Rank Rear Admiral
Commands held HMS Dolphin
HMS Cherub
HMS Andromeda
HMS Comus
Battles/wars Napoleonic Wars
Awards Companion of the Order of the Bath

Thomas Tudor Tucker, C.B. (1775–1852) was a British sailor from Bermuda. He was a Rear Admiral in the British Navy.

Order of the Bath Series of awards of an order of chivalry of the United Kingdom

The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. The name derives from the elaborate medieval ceremony for appointing a knight, which involved bathing as one of its elements. The knights so created were known as "Knights of the Bath". George I "erected the Knights of the Bath into a regular Military Order". He did not revive the Order of the Bath, since it had never previously existed as an Order, in the sense of a body of knights who were governed by a set of statutes and whose numbers were replenished when vacancies occurred.

United Kingdom Country in Europe

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east, the English Channel to the south and the Celtic Sea to the south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. The United Kingdom's 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi) were home to an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017.

Bermuda British overseas territory in the North Atlantic Ocean

Bermuda is a British Overseas Territory in the North Atlantic Ocean. It is approximately 1,070 km (665 mi) east-southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; 1,236 km (768 mi) south of Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia; and 1,759 km (1,093 mi) northeast of Cuba. The capital city is Hamilton. Bermuda is self-governing, with its own constitution and government and a Parliament which makes local laws. The United Kingdom retains responsibility for defence and foreign relations. As of July 2018, its population is 71,176, the highest of the British overseas territories.

Contents

Life

He was named for an uncle, Thomas Tudor Tucker, who served as Treasurer of the United States.[ citation needed ] The third of the eight sons (all in the public service) of Henry Tucker, secretary of the council of the Bermudas, he was born on 29 June 1775; Henry St George Tucker was his eldest brother. [1]

Thomas Tudor Tucker American politician

Thomas Tudor Tucker was a Bermuda-born American physician and politician representing Charleston, South Carolina. He was elected from South Carolina in both the Continental Congress and the U.S. House. He later was appointed as Treasurer of the United States and served from 1801 to his death in 1828, establishing a record as the longest-serving Treasurer.

Treasurer of the United States office in the United States Department of the Treasury

The Treasurer of the United States is an official in the United States Department of the Treasury who was originally charged with the receipt and custody of government funds, though many of these functions have been taken over by different bureaus of the Department. Responsibility for oversight of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the United States Mint, and the United States Savings Bonds Division was assigned to the Treasurer in 1981. As of 2002 the Office of the Treasurer underwent a major reorganization. The Treasurer now advises the Director of the Mint, the Director of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the Deputy Secretary and the Secretary of the Treasury on matters relating to coinage, currency and the production of other instruments by the United States.

After two voyages in the service of the East India Company, Tucker entered the Royal Navy in 1793 as master's mate of HMS Argo, with Captain William Clark, whom he followed to HMS Sampson, and HMS Victorious, in which he was present at the reduction of the Cape of Good Hope. On 21 March 1796 he was appointed acting lieutenant of HMS Suffolk on the East India station, in which and afterwards in the sloop HMS Swift, again in Victorious and in HMS Sceptre, he served as acting lieutenant for nearly four years. On her way homewards Sceptre was lost in Table Bay, on 5 November 1799. Many of her crew perished, and Tucker was left to find his own passage to England. [1]

East India Company 16th through 19th-century British trading company

The East India Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India Company, and informally known as John Company, Company Bahadur, or simply The Company, was an English and later British joint-stock company. It was formed to trade in the Indian Ocean region, initially with Mughal India and the East Indies, and later with Qing China. The company ended up seizing control over large parts of the Indian subcontinent, colonised parts of Southeast Asia, and colonised Hong Kong after a war with Qing China.

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years' War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

HMS <i>Argo</i> (1781) Roebuck-class ship

HMS Argo was a 44-gun fifth-rate Roebuck-class ship of the Royal Navy. She was launched in 1781 from Howdon Dock. The French captured her in 1783, but 36 hours later the British recaptured her. She then distinguished herself in the French Revolutionary Wars by capturing several prizes, though she did not participate in any major actions. She also served in the Napoleonic Wars. She was sold in 1816.

On arriving in London Tucker learned that the Admiralty refused to confirm his irregular promotion, and, after passing a second examination, he was made a lieutenant on 20 May 1800, into HMS Prince George, in which, and then in HMS Prince, he served in the Channel fleet till the Peace of Amiens. In June 1803 he was appointed to HMS Northumberland, carrying the flag of Rear-admiral Alexander Cochrane, at first off Ferrol, and later on in the West Indies, where, on 6 February 1806, he was present in the Battle of St. Domingo. He was then appointed by the admiral acting commander of HMS Dolphin, and, in succession, of several other ships; but his rank was not confirmed till 15 February 1808. In April he was moved into HMS Epervier. In it, and then in HMS Cherub, he captured enemy vessels protected by shore batteries. [1]

HMS Prince George was a 90-gun second-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 31 August 1772 at Chatham. During her career, she was upgraded to a 98-gun ship, through the addition of eight 12 pdr guns to her quarterdeck.

HMS Prince was a 98-gun second rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 4 July 1788 at Woolwich. She fought at the Battle of Trafalgar.

HMS <i>Northumberland</i> (1798) 1798 ship

HMS Northumberland was a 74-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built at the yards of Barnard, Deptford and launched on 2 February 1798.

In February 1810 Tucker assisted in the reduction of Guadeloupe. On the special recommendation of the commander-in-chief, Sir Francis Laforey promoted him to post rank on 1 August 1811. Remaining in Cherub, he sailed to England in September 1812, in charge of a large convoy. [1]

Guadeloupe Overseas region and department in France

Guadeloupe is an archipelago forming an overseas region of France in the Caribbean. It consists of six inhabited islands, Basse-Terre, Grande-Terre, Marie-Galante, La Désirade, and the Îles des Saintes, as well as many uninhabited islands and outcroppings. It lies south of Antigua and Barbuda and Montserrat, and north of Dominica. Its capital is Basse-Terre on the west coast, however the largest city is Pointe-à-Pitre.

Tucker was ordered to refit Cherub for foreign service, and early in December sailed for South America, and on to the Pacific, where, at the Juan Fernández Islands, he joined Captain James Hillyar of HMS Phoebe. He assisted in the capture of USS Essex, near Valparaiso, on 28 March 1814, a fight in which Tucker was severely wounded. In August 1815 Cherub returned to England, and was paid off. [1]

Juan Fernández Islands Special Territory and Commune in Valparaíso, Chile

The Juan Fernández Islands are a sparsely inhabited island group in the South Pacific Ocean reliant on tourism and fishing. Situated 670 km off the coast of Chile, they are composed of three main volcanic islands: Robinson Crusoe, Alejandro Selkirk and Santa Clara. The group is considered part of Insular Chile.

James Hillyar British Royal Navy admiral

Admiral Sir James Hillyar KCB KCH was a prominent British Royal Navy officer of the early nineteenth century, who is best known for his service in the frigate HMS Phoebe during the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. While in command of Phoebe, Hillyar was present at the Invasion of Ile de France in 1810, was heavily engaged at the Battle of Tamatave in 1811 and captured the USS Essex off Valparaíso in Chile in 1814. In addition, Hillyar was engaged in numerous other operations, his first battle occurring in 1781 off Boston. He remained in the Navy until his death in 1843, and was active at sea during the 1830s, commanding fleets in the North Sea and off Portugal. He was knighted twice and two of his sons later became full admirals, Charles Farrell Hillyar and Henry Shank Hillyar.

HMS <i>Phoebe</i> (1795) ship

HMS Phoebe was a 36-gun fifth rate of the Royal Navy. She had a career of almost twenty years and fought in the French Revolutionary Wars, the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. Overall, her crews were awarded six clasps to the Naval General Service Medals, with two taking place in the French Revolutionary Wars, three during the Napoleonic Wars and the sixth in the War of 1812. Three of the clasps carried the name Phoebe. During her career, Phoebe sailed to the Mediterranean, the Baltic, the Indian Ocean, South East Asia, North America and South America.

Tucker then commanded HMS Andromeda and HMS Comus for a few months, but after May 1816 had no employment. On 4 July 1840 he was nominated a Companion of the Order of the Bath; and on 1 October 1846 was put on the retired list, with the rank of rear-admiral. He died in London on 20 July 1852. [1]

Family

Tucker married, in 1811, Anne Byam Wyke, eldest daughter of Daniel Hill of Antigua, and left issue a son and three daughters. [1]

See also

Notes

Attribution

Wikisource-logo.svg  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain :  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1899). "Tucker, Thomas Tudor". Dictionary of National Biography . 57. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

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