Thomas Tudor Tucker (Royal Navy officer)

Last updated

Thomas Tudor Tucker
Born29 June 1775
Died20 July 1852 (aged 77)
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branch Royal Navy
Years of service1793–1846
Rank Rear Admiral
Commands held HMS Dolphin
HMS Cherub
HMS Andromeda
HMS Comus
Battles/wars Napoleonic Wars
Awards Companion of the Order of the Bath

Thomas Tudor Tucker, C.B. (1775–1852) was a British sailor from Bermuda. He was a Rear Admiral in the British Navy.

Contents

Life

He was named for an uncle, Thomas Tudor Tucker, who served as Treasurer of the United States.[ citation needed ] The third of the eight sons (all in the public service) of Henry Tucker, secretary of the council of the Bermudas, he was born on 29 June 1775; Henry St George Tucker was his eldest brother. [1]

After two voyages in the service of the East India Company, Tucker entered the Royal Navy in 1793 as master's mate of HMS Argo, with Captain William Clark, whom he followed to HMS Sampson, and HMS Victorious, in which he was present at the reduction of the Cape of Good Hope. On 21 March 1796 he was appointed acting lieutenant of HMS Suffolk on the East India station, in which and afterwards in the sloop HMS Swift, again in Victorious and in HMS Sceptre, he served as acting lieutenant for nearly four years. On her way homewards Sceptre was lost in Table Bay, on 5 November 1799. Many of her crew perished, and Tucker was left to find his own passage to England. [1]

On arriving in London Tucker learned that the Admiralty refused to confirm his irregular promotion, and, after passing a second examination, he was made a lieutenant on 20 May 1800, into HMS Prince George, in which, and then in HMS Prince, he served in the Channel fleet till the Peace of Amiens. In June 1803 he was appointed to HMS Northumberland, carrying the flag of Rear-admiral Alexander Cochrane, at first off Ferrol, and later on in the West Indies, where, on 6 February 1806, he was present in the Battle of St. Domingo. He was then appointed by the admiral acting commander of HMS Dolphin, and, in succession, of several other ships; but his rank was not confirmed till 15 February 1808. In April he was moved into HMS Epervier. In it, and then in HMS Cherub, he captured enemy vessels protected by shore batteries. [1]

In February 1810 Tucker assisted in the reduction of Guadeloupe. On the special recommendation of the commander-in-chief, Sir Francis Laforey promoted him to post rank on 1 August 1811. Remaining in Cherub, he sailed to England in September 1812, in charge of a large convoy. [1]

Tucker was ordered to refit Cherub for foreign service, and early in December sailed for South America, and on to the Pacific, where, at the Juan Fernández Islands, he joined Captain James Hillyar of HMS Phoebe. He assisted in the capture of USS Essex, near Valparaíso, on 28 March 1814, a fight in which Tucker was severely wounded. In August 1815 Cherub returned to England, and was paid off. [1]

Tucker then commanded HMS Andromeda and HMS Comus for a few months, but after May 1816 had no employment. On 4 July 1840 he was nominated a Companion of the Order of the Bath; and on 1 October 1846 was put on the retired list, with the rank of rear-admiral. He died in London on 20 July 1852. [1]

Family

Tucker married, in 1811, Anne Byam Wyke, eldest daughter of Daniel Hill of Antigua, and left a son and three daughters. [1]

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Lee, Sidney, ed. (1899). "Tucker, Thomas Tudor"  . Dictionary of National Biography . Vol. 57. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
Attribution

Wikisource-logo.svg This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain :  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1899). "Tucker, Thomas Tudor". Dictionary of National Biography . Vol. 57. London: Smith, Elder & Co.

Related Research Articles

Charles Yorke, 4th Earl of Hardwicke British naval commander and politician

Admiral Charles Philip Yorke, 4th Earl of Hardwicke, PC was a British naval commander and Conservative politician.

Robert Stopford (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral Sir Robert Stopford, was a distinguished officer in the Royal Navy whose career spanned over 60 years, from the French Revolutionary Wars to the Syrian War.

George Montagu (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral Sir George Montagu was a Royal Navy officer, the second son of Admiral John Montagu, and the brother of Captain James Montagu and Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Montagu.

Sydney Dacres

Admiral Sir Sydney Colpoys Dacres was an officer of the Royal Navy who saw service during the Greek War of Independence, when he was involved in an attack on the Turkish forces at Morea, and later during the Crimean War. Born into a substantial naval dynasty during the Napoleonic Wars, he eventually rose to the rank of Admiral and became First Naval Lord. His only significant action as First Naval Lord was to press for the abolition of masts. He went on to be Visitor and Governor of Greenwich Hospital.

Pulteney Malcolm

Admiral Sir Pulteney Malcolm was a British naval officer. He was born at Douglan, near Langholm, Scotland, on 20 February 1768, the third son of George Malcolm of Burnfoot, Langholm, in Dumfriesshire, a sheep farmer, and his wife Margaret, the sister of Admiral Sir Thomas Pasley. His brothers were Sir James Malcolm, Sir John Malcolm, and Sir Charles Malcolm.

Charles Austen Royal Navy admiral

Rear Admiral Charles John Austen CB was an officer in the Royal Navy and the youngest brother of novelist Jane Austen. He served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and beyond, eventually rising to the rank of rear-admiral.

Richard Dacres (Royal Navy officer)

Sir Richard Dacres was an officer of the British Royal Navy who saw service during the American War of Independence, and the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. A member of a substantial naval dynasty, he eventually rose to the rank of vice admiral.

Samuel James Ballard was a Vice-Admiral in the Royal Navy.

HMS <i>Epervier</i> (1803) Brig-sloop of the Royal Navy

HMS Epervier was a French 16-gun Alcyon-class brig. HMS Egyptienne captured her in the Atlantic Ocean on 27 July 1803; she was taken into Royal Navy service under her existing name. Before being broken up in 1811 she captured several prizes and was present at the Battle of San Domingo. Her crew received a clasp to the Naval General Service Medal for their participation in that battle and another for an action in December 1808. She was laid up in late 1810 and was sold in 1811.

Admiral Sir Robert Laurie, 6th Baronet of Maxwelton KCB was an officer of the Royal Navy who served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. He rose through the ranks after his entry, fighting as a lieutenant under Howe at the Glorious First of June, and being wounded in the action. Shortly after he served in the West Indies and off the American coast, where he operated successfully against enemy raiders and privateers, he was rewarded with the command of the frigate HMS Cleopatra, and in 1805 fought an action with a superior French opponent, Ville de Milan. He was forced to surrender his ship after several hours of fighting, but so heavily damaged the Frenchman that both she and the captured British vessel were taken shortly afterwards when another British frigate HMS Leander, arrived on the scene. Rewarded for his valour and honourably acquitted for the loss of his ship, he served throughout the rest of the Napoleonic Wars. He rose to flag rank after the end of the wars, eventually dying in 1848 with the rank of Admiral of the White. He inherited a baronetcy in 1804, but this became extinct upon his death.

Fleetwood Pellew

Admiral Sir Fleetwood Broughton Reynolds Pellew CB KCH was an officer of the Royal Navy who served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars.

Thomas Hurd

Thomas Hannaford Hurd was an officer of the Royal Navy, who rose to the rank of captain, becoming the second Hydrographer of the Navy, a Superintendent of Chronometers and a Commissioner on the Board of Longitude. Hurd Peninsula is named after him due to his role in the discovery of Antarctica.

Thomas Briggs (Royal Navy officer)

Admiral Sir Thomas Briggs was an officer of the British Royal Navy who served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and went on to be Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth.

Rear-Admiral Edward Boxer CB was an officer of the Royal Navy. He served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and died during the Crimean War with the rank of rear-admiral.

William Fisher, was an officer of the Royal Navy and a novelist.

Hood Hanway Christian was a British naval officer who reached the rank of Rear-Admiral. He fought in several naval engagements during the Napoleonic Wars between 1800 and 1814. Later he was Commodore of the naval squadron based on the Cape of Good Hope.

Frederick Warren was an officer of the Royal Navy who served during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, and the Gunboat War, rising to the rank of vice-admiral.

Admiral Sir Claude Henry Mason Buckle was an English naval officer.

George Frederick Ryves was an officer of the Royal Navy who saw service during the American War of Independence, and the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, rising to the rank of rear-admiral.

Anthony Maitland, 10th Earl of Lauderdale Royal Navy admiral and hereditary peer

Admiral Anthony Maitland, 10th Earl of Lauderdale was a British naval officer who served during the French Revolutionary War, Napoleonic Wars and War of 1812. He also participated in the Bombardment of Algiers. He served as Member of Parliament for Haddington Burghs between 1813-1818 and Berwickshire between 1826 and 1832. From 1830 until he was promoted to rear-admiral in 1841 he was a naval aide-de-camp to at first King William IV and then Queen Victoria.