Thomas Turner (Congressman)

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Thomas Turner (September 10, 1821 in Richmond, Kentucky – September 11, 1900 in Mount Sterling, Kentucky) was an American politician. Between 1877 and 1881 he represented the state of Kentucky in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Richmond, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Richmond is a home rule-class city in and the county seat of Madison County, Kentucky, United States. It is named after Richmond, Virginia, and is the home of Eastern Kentucky University. The population was 33,533 in 2015. Richmond is the third-largest city in the Bluegrass region and the state's sixth-largest city. Richmond serves as the center for work and shopping for south-central Kentucky. Richmond is the principal city of the Richmond–Berea Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Madison and Rockcastle counties.

Mount Sterling, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Mount Sterling – often written as Mt. Sterling – is a home rule-class city in Montgomery County, Kentucky, in the United States. The population was 6,895 at the 2010 U.S. census. It is the county seat of Montgomery County and the principal city of the Mount Sterling micropolitan area.

Career

Thomas Turner first attended the Richmond Academy and then the Centre College in Danville in 1840. After a subsequent law degree from Transylvania Law School in Lexington and his 1842 admission to the bar, he began practicing law in Richmond. From 1845 to 1846 he worked as a prosecutor. He was a soldier during the Mexican–American War. In November 1854, Turner moved to Mount Sterling, where he practiced law. Between 1861 and 1863 he served as a Democrat in the United States House of Representatives for Kentucky.

Richmond Education Centre / Academy is a 5-12 school attended by about 355 students located in Louisdale, Nova Scotia, Canada. The high school was built when the former St. Peter's District High School and Isle Madame District High School merged into one school. This was the result of the four former school boards Antigonish Regional School Board, Guysborough District School Board, Inverness County School Boardand Richmond County School Board. Because of declining enrollments, Richmond Academy became a 5-12 school in September 2013.

Centre College college in Kentucky

Centre College is a private liberal arts college located in Danville, Kentucky, a community of approximately 16,000 in Boyle County, about 35 miles (55 km) south of Lexington, Kentucky. Centre is an undergraduate four-year institution with an enrollment of approximately 1,400 students. Centre was founded by Presbyterian leaders, and it maintains a loose affiliation with the Presbyterian Church (USA). It was officially chartered by the Kentucky General Assembly in 1819. The college is a member of the Associated Colleges of the South and the Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities.

Danville, Kentucky City in Kentucky, United States

Danville is a home rule-class city in Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. It is the seat of its county. The population was 16,690 at the 2015 Census. Danville is the principal city of the Danville Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Boyle and Lincoln counties.

Turner was elected in 1876 to represent the ninth district of Kentucky in the U.S. House of Representatives, succeeding Republican John D. White. After being re-elected in 1878, he was defeated by in 1880 by his predecessor, White. After leaving Congress, Turner retired from politics. In the following years he worked as a lawyer again. He died in Mount Sterling.

John D. White American politician

John Daugherty White was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky, nephew of John White.

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
John D. White
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 9th congressional district

March 4, 1877 March 3, 1881
Succeeded by
John D. White


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